(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report"

Maryl: 



a. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/report00nnary_86 



STATE OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



NINETY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

l^-^c State Board of Education . 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




MARYLAND DIRECTORY 
SCHOOL OFFICIALS 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

'Same Address Term Expires 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., President Federalsburg 1964 

George C. Rhoderick, Jr., Vice-president Middletown 1961 

Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole Chevy Chase 1962 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin Aberdeen 1966 

Dwight 0. W. Holmes Baltimore 1965 

Richard Schifter Bethesda 1963 

"William L. Wilson Cumberland 1967 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1 

Name Office 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

David W. Zimmerman Assistant State Superintendent 

William S. Sartorius Assistant State Superintendent in Administration, Finance, and Research 

W. Theodore Boston Director of Certification and Accreditation 

Nettie B. Taylor Director of Library Extension 

Herschel M. James Director of Vocational Education 

Robert C. Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

Willis H. White Director of Instruction 

E, Drusilla Chairs Administrative Assistant II 

Dorothy E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Anne M. Rvland Senior Stenographer 

Walter Blackwell ChafFeur I 

Division of Instruction — WiLLis H. WHITE, Director 

Paul E. Huffington Assistant Director and Supervisor of High Schools 

*Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Instruction 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education 

Sarah L. Leiter Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Mrs. Geneva E. Flickinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

Andrew W. Mason Svipervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller Supervisor of Special Education 

Thomas W. Pyles Supervisor of High Schools 

Lewin A. Wheat Supervisor of High Schools 

Beverly J. Sheain Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverh' B. Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Mildred M. Faulstich Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Esther R. Furman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Janet L. Harrison Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rosalind C. Lohrfinck Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rena B. Levitz Senior Stenographer 

Agnes M. Roberts Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Oma R. McClung Senior Typist 

Division of Vocational Education — HersCHEL M. James, Director 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Evel3Ti F. Miller _ Supervisor of Home Economics 

*Mrs. Anorniallee M. Way State Adviser for High School Homemakers Club 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor for Veterans On-the-Job Training Program 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Lillian 0. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Sandra R. Bush Senior Stenographer 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 

Division of Certification and Accreditation — W. THEODORE BOSTON, Director 

James L. Reid Assistant Director and Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

Harold D. Rppse _ , Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education 



Part time 



Name Office 

Eleanor G. Wcagly Supervisor of School Lunch Prosrara 

C. William Anthony Supervisor of Teacher Recruitment 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

Greorge A. Myers Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Pro^ara 

Charles O. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Carroll L. Speck Assistant Supervisor of Certification 

Helen Ellis Stenographer-Secretary 

Elsie F. Forman Stenographer-Secretjiry 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie R. Gale Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Miriam Rieger. Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. EvelvTi R. McClurkin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Bessie I. Rones Senior Stenographer 

Helen D. Wysocki Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Verlena Miller Senior Clerk 

Leah C. Dittmar Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Hanna Zusman Senior Clerk 

Helen D. Trumbauer Senior Clerk 

Division of Library Extension — NETTIE B. TAYLOR, Director 

Mae Graham Supervisor of Public School Libraries 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Martha J. Keydash Senior Stenographer 

STATE CURRICULUM CENTER 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Eleanor Hocker Counselor 

M. E. Naomi Johnson Associate Librarian 

Mrs. Margaret J. Smith Library Assistant 

Louis Myers Service Worker 

Division of Administration, Finance, and Research 

William S. Sartorius, Assistant State Superintendent 

William L. Barall Supervisor of Finance 

Wesley N. Dorn Supervisor of Instruction (Research) 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor of Teachers College Business Management 

Morris W. Rannels Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles V. Akeley . Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

l?ernard G. Geyer — Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Helen D. George Editor 

Jesse C. Gawthrop Auditor 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant I 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Statistician I 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistician II 

Mrs. Verda McClow Statistician II 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk I 

Margaret F. Flahavan Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Laura Gaither Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk II 

Pliyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs Dorothy M. Xorris Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Ruth S. Friedland Stenographer-Secretary 

Carrye Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Lenore Klein Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Dolores B. Jones Report Tvpi^t 

Mrs. Susan T. Brownfield ; Statistical Clerk 

Mrs. Clara P. Haffner Senior T.vpist 

Mrs. Ellen C. Gordon _ Senior Typist 

Mrs. Ruth V. Meyer Tabulating Equipment Operator 

Mrs. JoAnn Calvert Key Punch Operator 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — ROBERT C. THOMPSON, Director 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Services 

**George W. Keller Asst. Supvr. of Services for the Blind 

♦Francis J, Borges Medical Consultant 

• Part time 

** Address: 2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 



3 



Name Office 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Principal Stenographer 

Anne Nusinov Principal Stenographer 

METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest O. Allnutt, Jr Counselor 

Myrtle E. Chell Counselor 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Cochran Counselor 

James G. Dashiell Counselor 

J. Bruce Edemy Counselor 

Mrs. Sue H. Flowers Counselor 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor 

Harold B. Hayes Counselor 

William W. Lamprell Counselor 

I. D. Medinger Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Charles L. Reis Counselor 

Ruth W. Ring Counselor 

Morris L. Scherr Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor 

Lawrence E. Williams Counselor 

Emma Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Mary E. Farnandis Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mabel Dwj'er ^ Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Mary J. Ryman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Frances S. Goodwin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Louise T. Gregg Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Nancy H. Maslanka -Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Vivien L. Sener Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Mosner Senior Stenographer 

Bell Sklar Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive M. Mayo Receptionist 

EASTERN SHORE DISTRICT 

700 East Main Street, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Jack R. Nichols Counselor 

1 — Joseph E. Guschke Counselor 

2 — Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Ruth K. Lunsford (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Dorthy H. Slagle (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

1 — P.O. Box 576, Easton Health Center, Centreville Road, Easton 

2 — Board of Education, ChestertoASTi 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Leslie B. Cole Counselor 

1 — Fedon G. Nides Counselor 

2 — Stanley I. Scher Counselor 

3 — Carroll Walsh Counselor 

3 — F. dePaul Whitehurst Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Jeannette D. Dart (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Frances L. Winkler (half-time) - Senior Stenographer 

3 — Mrs. Joan B. C. Clark Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cruz Senior Stenographer 

1 — Speer Building, 3 Church Circle, Annapolis 

2 — Board of Education, La Plata 

3— 26 South Perry Street, Rockville 

WESTERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

74 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

H. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Bernard F. Kelly Counselor 

Edward J. Shuck Counselor 

1 — John M Cobun Counselor 

2 — Stanley Hamilton, Jr Counselor 

3 — William C. Hill -Counselor 



4 



Xame Office 
WESTERN MARYLAND (Cont'd) 

1 -Mrs. Betty J. Loveiistein (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

■2 — Mrs. Eleanor B. Gorsuch (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

3 — Mrs. Elizabeth K. Baker (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Annie G. McCarty Senior Stenographer 

1 — 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

2— P.O. Box 121, Room 12, City Hall, Westminster 

3 — 115 East Church Street, Frederick 



DISABILITY DETERMINATIONS PROGRAM 

(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 

10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 2 

Robert Tj. Burton Assistant Superivisor in Charge 

David Forsyth Jimior Counselor 

Arthur W. Rees Junior Counselor 

Minnie Gerber -Junior Counselor 

Kathleen E. Scheve Junior Counselor 

*Hilary O'Herlihy, M.D Medical Consultant 

* Mahmud Thamer, M.D Medical Consultant 

*S. J. Venable, M.D Medical Consultant 

Mrs. Octavia D. Hastings Senior Stenographer 

Klizabctli De Polo Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Julia A. Fanning Senior Ste'i(igr:ipher 

Metty L. Block Senior Typist 



MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTE>I 

Board of Trustees and Office Staff 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 

301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice-chairman State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury' Elementarj' School, Wicomico Count3' 

Louis L. Goldstein State Comptroller 

Willis H. White Director, Division of Instruction, State Department of Education 

John P. Mannion Director 

C. G. Cristis Accountant 

Edgar T. Pfaff Administrative Assistant II 

Mrs. Ruth F. Connell Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Mildred Scott Senior Account Clerk 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Emelia Kufer Accoimtine: Machine Operator 

Eva Shagogue Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anna M. Novak Senior Typist 

Mrs. Anne Trhlik Senior Clerk 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Allegany Coimty Library Mary G. Walsh 

Anne Arundel Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Baltimore City Enoch Pratt Free Library Edwin Castagn;i. Director 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnicli 

Calvert Calvert County Library Edward Hall 

Caroline Denton Public Library 

Federalsburg Community Library Mrs. William T. Mi'ssick 

Ridgely Community Library Mrs. Paul Hoffman 

Carroll Carroll County Public Library, Westminster Margaret J. Hoefer 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Edward Hall 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge ^ Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Hurlock Free Public Library Mrs. Flo3'd N. Harper 

Vienna Public Library Mrs. Alan Webb 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Emmitsburg Public Library . Louise Sebold 

Thurmont Public Library Mrs. Ernest Hammakor 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, Oakland Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Roenna Fahmey 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Che8terto\vn Public Librarv Cornelia Davis 



Part time 



5 



County Library Librarian 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Elizabeth B. Hage 

Queen Anne's Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville Mrs. Mary M. Hoopes 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, L€onardto\vn_ Edward Hall 

Somerset Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield Mrs. Gladys Daugherly 

Princess Anne Public Library 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

Washington Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown Roy Provins 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Worchester County Library Mrs. Dorothy G. Moore 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T, Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Parlett L. Moore Coppln, Baltimore-17 

Wilbur Devilbiss Salisbury 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
108 Washington Street, Cumberland 

Name Office 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Assistant Superintendent and Supervisor of High Schools 

Jack A. Retry Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

Arthur G. Ramey Supervisor of Transportation 

Margaret E. Doak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I. Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

LaVern J. Hahn Supervisor of Music Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth O. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladj'S Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Glenn U. Hanna Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and Office Manager 

Helen B. Dickerhoff Secretary to the Superintendent 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 
Green Street, Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent — Administration 

Frank C. Gimderloy Director of Construction 

Ernest H. Herklotz Supervisor of Purchasing 

Mrs. Madolj-n R. Leonard Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr SuperWsor of Transportation 

Larry Bonari Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Leonard Johnson Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Henry G. Weaver Assistant Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Mrs. Mary Franke Assistant in Finance 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent — Elementary Schools 

Richard R. Clopper Director of Senior High Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Director of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Eva M. Pumphrey Director of Curriculum 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred B. Fowler Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Carl Mauro Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G, Myers Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

EA'erett Pettigrew Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Instruction — Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

WajTie M. Cornwell Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 



6 



Name Office 
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY (Cont'd) 

James W. Duiiagan Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

\iinabelle' E. Ferffuson Supervisor of Iiistructioii--Sfcon(larv Schools 

Mrs. Katherine K. Frantum Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Katharine Kibler Super\isor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Douglas S. King Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Edward Konick Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Hetty J. Mitchell Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Dorothy Noble Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schoolp 

Roland Olson Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Joshua M. Potter Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glorious Shenton Supervisor of Instruction — Secondary Schools 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Econotnics 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Marv E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Grady L. Ballard Director of Personnel and Research 

Mrs. Ellen T. Elliott Assistant in Personnel 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services for Children 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Ruth P, Eason . Supervisor of Special Education 

(Jeorge E. Klinkhamer Supervisor of Special Education 

Marne L. Groff School Psychologist 

John Malcolm School Psychologist 

Jay Orr Visiting Teacher 

Esther Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

Jack Hogsten , Visiting Teacher 

B. Lewis Landton Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Parlett Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Annie Witheridge Visiting Teacher 



BALTIMORE CITY 

3 East Twenty-fifth Street, Baltinuirc- 18 

George B. Brain. Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent, Staff Services 

William E. Lehr Assistant Superintendent, School Facilities 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent, Business Management 

Vernon S. Vavrina Assistant Superintendent. Secondary, Vocational, Adult Education 

Robert O. Lloyd Administrative Assistant, General Administratior. 

I'dward H, Gtoldstcin Special Assistant, General Administration 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

Robert H. Nicholson Director of Cafeterias 

George F. Smith Director of Equipment and Supplies 

?>lith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl Goetz Area Director of Elementary Education 

Helen Hermon Area Director of Elementarv Education 

Mrs. Marion 0. Johnson Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Eleanor R. Shank Area Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Health and Phys'cal Education 

M. Bernice Wiese Director of Library Sers-ices 

Emile H. Serposs Director of Music Eklucation 

Walter A. Maccubbin Director of Personnel 

Angela M. Broening Director of Bureau of Publications 

Albert G. Packard Director of Educational Testing Service 

Leona C. Buchwald Director of Guidance and Placement Service 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services for Pupils 

Orlando F. Furno Director of Research 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

Harrie M. Selznick Director of Special Educaton 

Charles Golab Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Alexina C. Stidham Administrative Assistant, Secondary, Vocational, Adult Education 

Lavinia W. Keagle Special Assistant, Special Education 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor of Audio-Visual Education 

Mrs Eloise Payne Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Elizabeth C. Bonthron Supervisor of Cafeterias 

John E. Wall Supervisor of Cafeteria Facilities 

H. Spilman Burns Supervisor of Procurement of Supplies and Equipment 

D\\ight S. Caskey Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Irvin R. Brose Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

O. Eugene Albright Supervisor of School Accoimting 

Mrs. LaVerna W. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

-Mis. Rebecca E. Carroll Supervisor of Elementary Education 



7 



Name Office 
BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Mis. Lillian H. r)aiitle\- Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. A. Katherine Gross . Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Charlotte M. Hurtt Supervisor of Elementary Education 

CaroljTi E. Motschiedler Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie B. Schmuck Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lily W. Stevenson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margaret Freudenberger Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anna M. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith E. Hale ..Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Doris Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Maria Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jeannette Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lydia L. Atkins Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Helen A. Nitkoski Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs, Lucille Williams Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margery Prout Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Calvin Carrington Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith Corcoran Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Katherine Buckley ^ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Bulcken 1 Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jennette Caplan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ethel Cox _^ _ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs, Florence D. Bailey Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lenore Dickman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs Ethel Hooker Supervisor of Elementary Education 

EvelvTi Josephson _ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Karas __. Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ada Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edna Maciekowich Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alma McMahon Supervisor of Eletnentary Education 

Mrs. Gwendolyn St>;il)orne Supervisoi- of Elementary Education 

Mary Metz Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elaine Nolan , Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Idelle Riefle Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anne Royer Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edna Russell Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mi-s. Sara Teiger _ _ Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vera Carrington Supervisdr of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean Eifert Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vashti Jude Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Tilden Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anna Cella Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Dorothy Diehl Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mi's. Mary ' Veloso Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs Madessa H. Wallace Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian B. Reid Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pauline D. Smnth Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

George F. Horn „ Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Virginia G. Timanons Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth Walton Supervis(vr of Art, Elementary Education 

Andrew T. Norgan Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Mary Elizabeth McCoy Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Ruth O. Cinsky Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

R. Eveljn Douglass Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Dorothy V. Horine Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Leo C. Woods Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music Education 

Don Regier Supervisor of Secondary School Vocal Music 

Mrs. Alice Rusk Supervisor of Library Services 

Lillie G. Patterson Supervisor of Library Services 

Olive Mumford Supervisor of Libraiy Services 

Mrs. Margaret A. Binns Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Abia F. Jackson . Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Constance Pawelek Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Downs Supervisor of Eleinenlnry Music Education 

Delia V. Weber Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer . Supervisor of Kleinentaiy Music Education 

Mrs. Hildreth S. Lambert Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Herbert Stern Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Anna M. Schone Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

William C. McClean Supervisor of Personnel 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Workers 

Paul Yaffe Supervisor of Psychological Services 

Clara E. Grether Supervisor of Research 

Herschel H. Newlin Administrative Supervisor of School Facilities 

Dorothy M. Kell Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Leonard Woolf Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 



8 



Name Office 
IJALTIMOIIE CITY (Coni .l) 

L. Earl Welleraeyer_._ _ __. Supervisor of Knglisli, Srcoiidary Schools 

Otto K. Schmied Supervisor of Foreign Lanj^uages, Secondary Sc:hools 

Thomas D. Troy Supervisor of Foreign Languages, Secondary' Schools 

Edward Biller, Jr Supervisor of Geography, Secondary Schools 

Zelda B. Brenner Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Frank Fairbank - Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Edythe D. Myers Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Eunice Bowers Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

William J. Gcrardi .. . Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

S. Leroy Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy H. Fader Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Sidney Blum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Robert Buxbaum _ Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

.lames Francey Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

•lames O. Proctor Supervisor of Vocatinn;]! Education for Adults 

K. Duncan Hyde - Supers ( i business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor ct l)i>n iljutivo Education 

Nellie S. Buckey Supervisor ot Home Economics 

Mrs. Suella Harrington Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mrs. koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Special Education in Secondary Schools 

G. Edward Griefzu Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

Carl J. White -- _ Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Katharine Whiteside-Taylor Supervisor of Parent Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor of General Adult Education 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education in Elementary Schools 

Louise Young Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Lillian Maith Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Bevans Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sadie Douglass Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Warrell Supervisor of Special Education 

Helen Knox Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Florence Owings Supervisor of Special Education 

Frank Bennett - _ ..Supervisor of Safety Education 

Mrs. Eleanora B. Kane Supervisor of Radio and TV Education 

Ambrose Chlada, Jr Supervisor of School Facilities 

Oscar L. Helm__ Supervisor, General Adult Education 

C. Wilson Knauff Supervisor of Stores, Accountirig, and Distribution 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Charles A. Pertsch Senior District Supervisor of Maintenance 

James K. Legg District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Louis H. Reitz Senior Supervisor of Heating, Plumbing, and Ventilating Installations 

Albert S. Valench Senior District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Milton B. Malan Supervisor of School Repair Shop 

Kazmer Grabarkie^^icz Supervisor of Operations and Custodial Training 

•lohn P. Lockwich Supervisor of Operating Engineers 

Sampson D. Ruffin Supervisor of School Building Operations 

.Tohn D. Scanlon Supervisor of School Building Operations 

William T. Dorsey Supervisor of School Custodians 

Albert W. Clark, Jr. Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Edward A. Paris . . _ ^ Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Louis Kopera __ . . Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Elmer P. Jennings _ __ Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Ernest Gambrill Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Albert F. Hartka Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Vernon H. Bvus Assistant Supervisor of Vocational Education 

Jack F. Bocher Supervisor of Transix)rtation 

Maurice L. Reilly _ _ _ . . Business Manager. Cafeterias 

Gustav A. Brandt Senior Administrative Officer, Office Services 

Mrs May Richardson __ _ Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Mrs. Helen C. Starr _ Head. Department of Home Visitor Service 

Mrs. Barbara Levine Head, Department of Speech Correction 

Ruth Richards _ Specialist in Personnel 

Louis A. Sedlak Specialist in Personnel 

Edith Pruss Specialist in Personnel 

alter Miller Specialist in Personnel 

John F. Giblette Specialist in Aptitude Testing 

Mrs. Cleo C. Ammen Specialist in Aptitude Testing 

Mary Jane Shapiro _ Specialist in Reading Analvsis 

Charles Cephas _ _ Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Marjorie Everingliim _ Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Dolhe R. Walker.. Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Eugenie Wheeler _ Specialist in School Social Work 

Maxwell J. Franktord Specialist in School Social Work 

CJiester L. Kiser Specialist in Research 

Martin H Raila^ Specialist in Research 

Leanore M. Coard - Specialist in Personnel 

Mrs. Minnie W. Graham Specialist in Americanization, Citizenship and Elem. Education 

Francis M. Froelicher Associate in Education for Older Adult. 

Mrs. Margaret H. ^^ est Secretarv to the s„p..rintondent 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 



Aigburtk Mauor, Towsoti 4 
(1) Soll.-rs Point High School, Sparrows Point 19 

Maine Office 

Edward G. Stapleton Superintendent of Schools 

Joshua R. Wheeler Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

Horner 0. Elseroad Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

William T. Willis, Jr. Assistant Superintendent in Finance 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation and Maintenance 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

Loyal W. Joos Director of Educational Research and Planning 

Charles M. DeWitt Director of Pupil Services 

Leon E. Grant . Director of Purchasing 

Walter M. Gordon, Sr Director of Transportation 

Walter M. Snyder Director of Personnel 

William A, Marshall, 3rd Assistant Construction Engineer 

Preston L. Grimm Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

Vincent Brant Supervisor of High Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Carey K. Sentz Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of High Schools 

Mary R. Childs Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of High Schools 

Robert W. Gifford Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Margie B. Handy Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Samuel D. Herman Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mervin L. Keedy Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Mary E. Saterlie Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Josiah A. Blacklock Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Shirley V. Conner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde Dreclisler Supervisor of Elementary Schot>ls 

(1) Mrs. Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Gene M. Hastings Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Requard Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

M. Ethel Troyer Supervisor of Art 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Nicholas Geriak Supervisor of Music 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical EducatioJi 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Business and Adult Education 

Paul P. Plevyak Supervisor of Business Education 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

William A. Odell Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Ralph E. Kessler Supervisor of Special Education 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Gloria L. Engnoth Supervisor of Special Education 

Charles E. Leiman Supervisor of Clinical Services 

Anna R. Meeks- Supervisor of Guidance 

Emsma E. Williams Supervisor of Guidance 

William E. Kline Supervisor of Testing 

Mrs. Ruthetta L. Gilgash Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Adele Tomey Woronka Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

E. Lyle Root Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

Dorothy A. McGinniss Supervisor of Library Services 

Mrs. Louise W. Erlbeck Supervisor of Secondary Nursing Program 

William O. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mildred E. Jones Supervisor of Visiting Teachers 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Maintenance and Operation 

Ian Gordon Supervisor of Grounds Operations 

Henry Schleisener Supervisor of Grounds 

Mrs. Margaret S. Farlow Supervisor of Credentials 

Herbert Q. Otter Assistant Supervisor, Plant Maintenance 

Donald E. Ouster Assistant Supervisor Plant Operations 

Thomas S. Bowyer Assistant Supervisor, Grounds Maintenance 

Gilbert SchifFman Supervisor of Reading 

Helen G. Huttenhauer Assistant in Publications 

*Merle S. Bateman Assistant in Publications 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio-Visual Aids 



* Part time 

10 



Name Office 
BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

C. Thomas Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Ray H. Wingerd Assistant in Transportation 

William F. Stammer Assistant in Transportation 

H. Erich Koch Assistant in Plant Operations 

William C. Strasser Specialist in Educational Information 

John H. Day, Jr Assistant in Educational Information 

Charles T. Mahan Assistant in Real Estate and Records 

Jack L. O'Donnell Mechanical Assistant, Engineering 

Andrew L. Bareham Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

Charles F. Beyer Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

Edgar J. Price Assistant in Grounds Operation 

W. LeRoy Willis Assistant in Plant Operations 

C. H. Brown, Jr Aichitocturul Assistant 

Edward R. Clemons ^ Assistant l.andsiape Architect 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant in Purchasing 

Thomas Wilhelm, Jr Assistant in Purchasing 

Kenneth C. Towle Assistant in Statistics and Researcli 

John H. Day, Jr Special Assistant 

William J, Kinling Assistant in Cliild Accoimting 

John C. McLaulin Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

A. Price Ransone Assistant in Educational Research and Planning 

Allen M. Sutton Assistant in Personnel 

Joe H. Leckrone , Assistant in Personnel 

Gertrude A. Wardell Lil)rary Cataloguer 

O. Barry Carpenter Assistant in Accounting 

Mrs. Olga D. Cooper Psychologist 

Mrs. Hermione H. Hawkins Psychologist 

David A. Loiry Psychologist 

Walter M. Musgrove Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Sheldon K. Riggs Psychologist 

Roger E. Saunders Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth E. Sherman Psychologist 

Arthur M. Green Psychologist 

Jordon Lawrence Psychologist 

Gloria M. McDowell Psychologist 

David H. Black Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Edna S. Congdon Visiting Teacher 

Wanda S. Greene Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart — Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Marie J. Hunycutt Visiting Teacher 

Thomas J. Jordan Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irma R. Kell Visiting Teacher 

Evelyn B. Maus Visiting Teacher 

(1) Mrs. Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Vivian S. Mcintosh Visiting Teaclier 

Mrs. Frances N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

Angelo V. Quaranto Visiting Teacher 

Louis S. Sagi . Visiting Teacher 

Helen-Louise Scarborough Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth Z. Steiner Visiting Teacher 

Mary L. Stoll Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Kathr3Ti R. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Susan Summers Visiting Teacher 

Edna S. Warwick Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Mary G. Wlieeler Visiting Teacher 

F. Richard Keyton Visiting Teacher 

Delores M. Strauss Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Evelyn C. Norton Financial Secretary to the Superintendent 

Mrs. Carol J, Day Secretary to the Superintendent 



CALVERT COUNTY 

Court House, Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens, Jr Director of Instruction 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Lloyd J. Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

* William J. Middleton , Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Parran . Chief Bookkeeper 

\\. Anne Yoe . Secretary to Superintendent 



Part time. 



11 



CAROLINE COUNTY 



Law Building, Denton 



Name 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner 

Louise C. Dennison 

Lewis W. Davis 

Fred G. Usilton 

Frederick H. Sheelev 

Richard W. Hall____" 

Mrs. Bertha M. Williams 

Mrs. Virginia M. York 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak 

Mrs. M^Ttle Jane Good__. 
Elizabeth Ann Thawlcv-.- 



Offi.ce 

Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of Instruction 

Supervisor of Instruction 

Supervisor of Instruction 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Transportation and Special Services 

— Financial Secretary 

Secretary-Bookkeeper 

Secretary to Superintendent 

. Secretary 

Secretary 



CARROLL COUNTY 

Carroll County Office Building, Westminster 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Evon F. Bowers Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Maraget M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 

Fred L. Engle Supervisor of High Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

**Mae Prince Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine D. West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

*Philip S. Royer Supervisor of Music 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Dolores J. Snyder Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Huber Visiting Teacher 

Roland F. Haifley Assistant in Custodial Services, School Lunch and Maintenance 

Maurice V. Wolfe Assistant in General Maintenance and Utilities 

Charles E. Ecker Supervisor of Transportation 

* Herbert M. Phillips Assistant in Transportation 

Curvin M. Seitz .. Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Nadine Saylor Assistant Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert Secretary to the Superintendent 

Treasa Bear Receptionist and Stenographer 

Mrs. Pauline D. Peterson Secretary to the Supervisors 



CECIL COUNTY 

308 Court House, Elkton 

Robert A. Gibson Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Walter J. Finn Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. EveljTi P. Kay Supervisor of Eleu?entary Schools 

Norman ,J. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Edwin II. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

Samuel H. Dixon Supervisor of Transportation 

Louis P. Wright Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Mary A. Grouse Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Bookkeeper and Financial Secretary 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

Elaine J. Dawson Secretary 

Mrs. Adrienne L. Boyd Secretary 

Mrs. Ruth M. Diem Secretary 

Mrs. Marie L. Bruner Secretary 

Mrs. Barbara A. Halligan Audiometrist 

Leslie L. Pippin Building Inspector 

CHARLES COUNTY' 

Court House, Charles Street, La Plata 

C. Paul Barnhart Superintendent of Schools 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Christine E. Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Joseph C. Parks . Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia B. Lucas Visiting Teacher 

• Part time. 

** Part time. Also serves as teacher in Robert ^P*An Sr. -Jr. High School. 

12 



Name Office 
CHARLES COLMV (Cont.l) 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Marianne M. Canter Clerk 

Mrs. Mary Jane Frere Clerk 

Mrs. Hazel J. Cary Clerk 

Peggy Lee Garner Clerk 

Mrs. Ann B. Thompson Clerk 



James C. Busick 

Albert S. Farver 

Evelyn E. Johnson 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys_. 

John Armstrong 

John T. Comer, Jr 

John A. Marshall, Jr 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte 
Mrs. Dorothy S. Stephens 
Charlotte Jean Cantwell. 



DORCHESTER COUNTY 
Court Lane, Cambridge 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of High Schools 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools 
^ Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Bookkeeper 

Financial Secretary 

Secretary to Superintendent 

Stenocranher 



FREDERICK COUNTY 

115 East Church Street, Frederick 

James A. Sensenbaugh Superintendent of Schools 

Harry Frushour Assistant Superintendent for Administration 

Quentin L. Earhart Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

*Duval W. Sweadner Supervisor of Adult Education 

Frederick J. Brown, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. EveljTi F. S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Siipei'visor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Lo\e Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Physical Education 

Janice Wickless Helping Teacher 

Herman A. Hauver Coordinator of Pupil Services 

James L. Fisher Supervisor of Music 

Richard E. Summers Supervisor of Art 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Library Service 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

* Marj' A. Nuce Supervisor of Home Economics 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Transportation 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph Rexroad Home Visitor 

Mary M. Fiery Home Visitor 

Mrs. Dorothy Nelson School Psychologist 

Tolbert F. Lawyer Supervisor of School Facilities 

n. D. Williams Assistant in Plant Operations 

William J. E. Null Assistant in Maintenance (Mechanical) 

Allen R. Gaddis, III Assistant in Administration 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to the Superintendent 



GARRETT COUNTY 
Fourth Street, Oakland 

Willard L. Hawkins.. Superintendent of Schools 

Foster D. Bittle Supervisor of Junior-Senior High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

•John L. Fitzwater Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Robert R. Martin Supervisor of Transportation 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Lucille Tasker Secretary to Superintendent 



HARFORD COUNTY 
45 East Gordon Street, Bel Air 

--Superintendent of Schools 

Assistant Superintendent 

Director of Instruction 

Director of Personnel 

Director of Public Relations 
Business Manager 



* Part time 



Charles W. Willis 

Benjamin S. Carroll 

Howard B. Peters 

C. Clark Jones 

George B. Prettyman, Sr. 
Alfonso A. Robertv 



13 



Name Office 
HARFORD COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Violet A. L)a\ is Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hazel L. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Helen M. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Jane M. Gent Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard J. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alden H. Halsey Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Annetta G. Wright Supervisor of High Schools 

John R. Walker Supervisor of Industrial Education 

W. Warren Sprouse Supervisor of Music 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles C. McCuUough Visiting Teacher 

Joseph F. Snee Visiting Teacher 

CJeorge N. Bollinger Administrative Assistant 

Howard R. Cheek Supervisor of Transportation 

Karle B. Wagner Administrative Assistant 

Edward J. Plevyak Administrative Assistant 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Engineer 

Mrs. Alice W. Crowl Financial Secretary 

Ann L. Campbell Secretary to Superintendent 



HOWARD COUNTY 

Court House Annex, Ellicott City 

John E. Tingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R, Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary E. White Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Transportation 

Gilbert E. Miller Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Walter D. Phelan - Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Sara S. Snapp Secretary to Superintendent 



KENT COUNTY 

400 High Street, Chestertown 

Reade W. Gorr Superintendent of Schools 

Robert J. Johnson_ Administrative Assistant 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

** George S. Rose Supervisor of Testing and Guidance 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Florence C. Ward Secretary to Superintendent 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
Box 231, Rockville 

C. Taylor Whittier Superintendent of Schools 

John A. Permenter Assistant Superintendent 

Richard E. Wagoner Acting Director of Secondary Education 

James C. Craig Director of Elementary Education 

William A. Early Director of Personnel 

Paul A. Henry Director of Administrative Services 

I.ost.er J. Welch Director of School Facilities 

Brian M. Benson Director of Finance 

Maxwell E. Burdette Director of Research 

Elaine Barnes Director of EducatioTial Services 

Sonia Brenner - Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William Brooinall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anne Caldwell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Theophil I. K. Muellen Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Etheleen Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Agnes Drewry Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William Evans Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Marion 0. Rockwood Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lillian Klein Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Martha Ann Satterfield , Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Edda Larimore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

•Part time. Also Vice-principal at Garnett Elementary School. 
**Part time. 



14 



Name Office 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

M. Francis Mitchell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elsie Schurter Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clare Stratemeyer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Philip Arsenault Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Marion Beckwith Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Thomas Bilek Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Sue M. Brett Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Kieran Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

William Fleming Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Greaney Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Leadore D. Du Bois Supervior of Secondary Schools 

Charles Proctor Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Jacob Rabinovich , Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

William F. Brennan Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Thomas W. Stevenson Assistant Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Murray L. Andrews Supervisor of Libraries 

**Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Foreiem Langruaffes 

Crescent J. Bride Supervisor of Physical Education 

Edmund T. Burke Supervisor of Science 

William C. Feddeman Administrative Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Noble V. Fritz . - Supervisor of Commercial Education 

Edmund S. Hoffmaster, Jr Assistant Supervisor of Science 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor of Music 

Mary Mohler Supervisor of Remedial Reading- 
Leonard Oass Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Chester Petranek Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Barbara Riley Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education 

Hazel Smith" . Assistant Supervisor of Music 

Marjorie St. Clair Supervisor of Art 

Mirian Tannhauser Administrative Supervisor in Special Education 

ElizabetJi Engel Assistant Supervisor in Special Education 

Louise S. Walker Supervisor of Audiovisual Aids 

James W. Jacobs Curriculum Coordinator 

Mary H. AVatson Administrative Assistant to Assistant Superintendent 

Helen M. Johnson Supervisor of In-Senice Education 

John P. Causey - Assistant Director of Elementary Education 

Ruth S. Gue Assistant Director of Elementary Education 

Helen P. Bready Assistant Director of Secondary Education 

Bob R. Nichols Assistant Director of Secondary Education 

Kenneth W. Rollins Supervisor of Guidance 

Julia Watkins Supervisor of Home Arts 

T. Owen Knight Administrative Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard A. Cleveland Visiting Teacher 

Reno A. Continefti Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Robert F. Fioramonti Visiting Teacher 

Anidred D. Clement A isiting Teacher 

Henry J. Giauque-_ Visiting Teacher 

Jewel A. Green Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Henley _ Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Weymouth H. Judkins Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Anne H. Medvick Visiting Teacher 

Edith P. Popenoe Area Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Geraldine Re.vnolds Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Sagneri Visiting Teacher 

Henry Shetterly Visiting Teacher 

Marjorie Van Dien Visiting Teacher 

Eileen D. Wilkinson Visiting Teacher 

Edward A. Hebda Visiting Teacher 

AVilliam B. Prig<; . Visiting Teacher 

Cecile Finley _ Chief Psychologist 

William H. Ashbaugh Psychologist 

Gilbert Ghitelman Psychologist 

Charlotte M. Simos Psychologist 

George Usdansky Psychologist 

Margaret O. Battison . Assistant Psychologist 

Miller Eves Psychologist 

Jane S. Harris Assistant Psychologist 

Pearl Haugh Assistant Psychologist 

Ruth Linn Assistant Psychologist 

Blanches Rochmes Psvchologist 

Ernest C. Young Assistant Psychologist 

M. S. H. Johnston Psychological Counselor in Special Education 

Helen Kohut Psychological Counselor in Remedial Reading 

Alexander M. Gottesman Administrative Assistant 

Dorothy B. Waleski Assistant for Information and Publications 

Helen Joseph Secretary to Superintendent 

George V. Mcnke Director of Operations and Safetv 

Otho H. Hawk Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds 

**Part time 

15 



Name Office 
M(>M(;OMEK'V COLMV (CoiuM) 

Jiinios L. Mulliiiix - _ Supervisor of Maintenance 

Corelli A. David Director of School Cafeterias 

Jane B. Boyd Supervisor of School Cafeterias 

June R. Odor Area Supervisor of School Cafeterias 

James H. Sheldon Director of Construction 

John S. Jenkins Architectural Assistant to Director of Construction 

Frank Snyder Administrative Aide to Director of Construction 

Edward T. Michaels Director of Purchasing 

Anton Suttora Supervisor of Purcliasing 

James R. Shade, Jr Director of Planning 

Robert F. Bierly Population Analyst 

Earl L. Yates Site Acquisition Aide 

Richard N. Ream Director of Transportation 

Jack B. Powell Assistant Director of Transportation 

Richard B. Grove Assistant Director of Finance 

V. Wilson Campbell Supervisor of Accounting- 
James B. Kline Senior Accountant 

Reginald J. Crockett Internal Auditor 

J. Gordon McDonald, Jr. Supervisor of Insurance and Federal Aid 

H. Douglas Hall Supervisor of Payroll and I. B. M. 

Wilton L. Kennedy Assistant Supervisor of Payroll and I. B. M. 

Irma B. Dumford Supervisor of Personnel — Elementary 

Forrest G. Shearin, Jr Assistant Supervisor of Personnel — Secondary 

Gertrude G. Justison Assistant Supervisor of Appraisal and Accounting 

Rufus C. Browning Assistant Director of Personnel 

Malowe C. Ausen Personnel Assistant in Statistics and Reports 

Anne D. Langen Personnel Assistant in Certification 

Anne A. Tackett Personnel Assistant in Elementary 

Max K. Emerson Transportation Area Supervisor 

Robert E. Elliott Transportation Area Supervisor 

Charles Wyatt - Transportation Area Supervisor 

.Jerome L. Otiutt Supervisor of Operations and Safety 

Roberta S. Abel Field Supervisor of School Lunch 

Gardner B. Jordan Director of Sites Acquisition 

AVilliam H. Melton Supervisor of Maintenance 

Arnold A. Adams Administrative Aide to Director of Construction 

Robert Kaufman Senior Accountant 

Samuel M. Goodman Supervisor of Research 

William 0. N. Scott Supervisor of Testing 

Robert McCord Coordinator of Professional Advancement Program 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Elementary Education 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Secondary Education 

Thomas S. Gwvnn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Edward S. Beach, Jr Administrative Assistant 

Robert Novak Dean, Prince George's Community College 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Emma M. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rita M. Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William W. Hall Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leila V. Hardesty Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elisabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Stella Spicknall Supervisor of Reading Clinic 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Nelda Davis Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Fossett Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Katherine Grimes Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dora Kennedy - Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Truman S. Klein Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Howard B. Owens Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary Snouffer - - Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Russell Olson Coordinator of Adult Education Program and the Evening High School 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz - Supervisor of Art Education 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Warren Smeltzer Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise B. Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs Frances H. Lvnch Supervisor of Music 

Mrs. Marilyn Krummel Supervisor of Music 

Vincent C. Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Ph.vsical Education 

16 



Name Office 
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUINTY (Could) 

C. Elizabeth Rieg _ .Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Frances H. Fuclus Assi>i:iiii Sup.-ivisnr dt Sju'cial Education 

Mrs. Margaret Conant C'd'irdinator of Parent Study Program 

Eugenia Balsley - Supervisor of Publications 

Francis Parker Coordinator Safety Education Activities 

Victor Rice Coordinator of Testing and Research 

Stanley Jacobson Supervisor of PsycholoKical Services 

Betty Howard School Psychologist 

Mrs. Martha Odell . School Psychologist 

Ferdinand Cardano _ Helping Teacher 

Bruce Hoak Helping Teacher 

Helen Bo\\Tnan Helping Teacher 

.John A. Woods Helping Teacher 

David Young Helping Teacher 

Marian E. Lobdell -- Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles O. Wendin f Assistant Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mary Kay Gardner Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

]-,illian L. Harvey Visiting Teacher 

Willie M. Henson Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Barbara R. Jones Visiting Teacher 

M. Dorothy Jump Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Nabors Visiting Teacher 

Harry Rose Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Charlotte Spencer Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth M. Bower Visiting Teacher 

Donald R. Burgess Visiting Teacher 

Harry F. Fauber Visiting Teacher 

Julian P. King Visiting Teacher 

Elmer K. Zeller _ - Supervisor of Purchasing 

1). Carl McMillen Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Alan Poole Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lorton Layman Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Leon Stout - Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Supervisor of Custodial Services 

William H. Smith _^ _ Senior Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

^frs. Ann Hall Assistant Superxisor of School Lunch ProsTam 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert __ _ — Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Anthony R. Miller Assistant SuiH-rvisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson ..Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Betty R. Collinson _ Assistant Secretarv to the Board of Education 



QUEEiN ANNE'S COUNTY 
C«'ntrcville 



Harry C. Rhodes 

John E. Miller 

Mrs. Alberta C. Browne__. 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack 

John H. Webb 

Mrs. Ix)la P. Brown 

Marie Shortall 

Mrs. Frances Rampmcyer 
Donna Harrington 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of Transportation and Hiuh Schools 

Elementary Supervisor 

Elementarv Supervisor 

High School Supervisor 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Financial Secretary 

T \- p i s t s t en oi;- r aphcr 

S(rliOi;i;ipl)er 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
Leonardtowii 

Robert E. King, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

James H. Ogden Assistant Superintendent of Schools aii'l Siijici \ ism of Instruction 

Richard L. Holler Sup. r\ isui of Instruction 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of Instruction 

Ralph S. Waters __ Supervisor of Instruction 

Harriet H. Reeder^ Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Beulah S. Bennett _ Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elberta W. Hayden Financial Secretarv 

Paul T. Hannen_ .. ^ Maintenance Engineer 

Howard G. Haverkamp __ Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

Mrs. Dolores G. Rose Coordinator of Cafeteria Services 

Mrs. Marie B. Burroughs . , Stenographer 

Helen Marie Owens_ - Stenographer 

Hattie M. Higgs. Financial Assistant 

Marion R. Pilkerton _ . Stenographer 

17 



SOMERSET COUNTY 



Court House Annex, Princess Anne 

Name Office 

John L. Bond Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp Supervisor of Elementary Education 

George F. Carrington Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Kermit A. Cuttman Supervisor of Elementary and Secondary Education 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Clarence N. Baughan Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Alva Bozman Laird Financial Secretary 

Mrs, Marian Tyler Colborn Stenographer-Typiet 

Mrs. EHzaliotli H. Murray Stenographer-Typist 



Serald E. Eichtcr 

Arthur R, Higginbottom 

Mrs. Lillian C. Davis 

Kathleen A. Francis 

Mrs. Virginia S. G. Darrow. 

P. Kennard Wright 

Robert W. Rausch 

Mrs. Eileen H. Camper 

Mrs. Betty M. Wilke 



TALBOT COUNTY 
Washington Street, Easton 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of High Schools 

Supervisor of Elementary Schools 
-Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Maintenance 

Controller 

Stenographer 

Clerk 



WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent 

William L. Donaldson Assistant Superintendent 

Carl R. Beer Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

C. Scott Couchman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alva D. Temple Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens Director of Curriculum and Supervision 

Miriam L. Hoffman- Supervisor of Music 

*Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of Home Economics 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Arts 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Claude B. Brubeck . Supervisor of Driver Education and Safety 

Catherine L. Beachloy Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

Russell L. Kepler _ Director of Plant Operations 

Delbert G. Sumnirrvillc Supervisor of Maintenance and Construction 

W. Harland Biuiis Supervisor of Plant Operations 

Joseph H. Vance ^ Supervisor of Transportation 

E. Raye Francis Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Robert F. Leslier Supervisor of Audiovisual 

T. Wilson Cahall Administrative Assistant 

John R. Brugger Chief Engineer (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

George H. Ropp Instructional Supervisor (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

James D. Morgan Supervisor of Testing 

V. Richard Martin Director of Pupil Personnel 

John E. McCue- Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

James R. Lemmert Visiting Teacher 

Mary E. Byer Visiting Teacher 

F. Richard Crowther Director of Finances 

Carl M. Mann Director of Purchases 

Mrs. Lois R. Malott Secretary to Superintendent 



WICOMICO COUNTY 
Main Street, Salisbury 

Royd A. Mahaffey Superintendent of Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Assistant Superintendent 

Harold A. Fulton Director of Instruction 

Carl W. Dumire Supervisor of High Schools 

Frederick H. Spigler, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Martha E. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles R. Berry Visiting Teacher 

Branche H. Phillips, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 



Tart time 

18 



Name Office 
WICOMICO COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Geneva D. Smith Bookkeeper 

Juanita L. Townsend Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Louise L. Layfield Bookkeeper-Clerk 

Mrs. Dorothy F. Alatthews Clerk-Steno^apher 

Mrs. Sally A. Bennett Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs, Janice W. Miles Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Shirley A. Davis Clerk -Stenographer 



WORCESTER COUNTY 

Murket Street, Snow Hill 

Paul D, Cooper Superintendent of Schools 

Paul S. Hyde Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Instriiction 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ernest G. Holland Visiting Teacher 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Transportation 

Clinton D. Cutright Supervisor of Maintenance and Purchasing 

p]lsie M. Dryden Clerk 

Mrs. Pauline S. Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mary Elizabeth Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mrs. An-etta H. Taylor Assistant Clerk 



19 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 22 

Legislation Affecting Education 23 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 28 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education : 

Certification and Accreditation 39 

Instruction 46 

Vocational Education 59 

Library Extension 62 

Vocational Rehabilitation 67 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 72 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools. . 72 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 73 

Grade Enrollment 74 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical 

Children 81 

Births in Maryland 89 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 92 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 93 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 94 

High School Graduates : Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 97 

High School Enrollment: by Subject 105 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 106 

Teachers: by Subject Taught, by Sex, Size of School, Summer School 
Attendance, Certification, Preparation, Resignations, Turnover, 

Source 116 

Costs of Maryland Schools : 

Total, Per Cent from State 143 

State Minimum Program 146 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 147 

Cost per Pupil 148 

Salaries 154 

Transportation 156 

Adult Education, Vocational Education 159 

School Lunch, Special Milk 166 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property. . . . 171 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 174 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 179 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 188 

Parent-Teacher Associations 189 

High School Equivalence 190 

Maryland Public Libraries 191 

Vocational Rehabilitation 192 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 194 

Index 242 

21 



January 1, 1962 



The Honorable J. Millard Tawes 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 



Dear Governor Tawes : 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the ninety-fifth 
''annual report covering all operations of the State department 
of education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of 
education throughout the State" for the period beginning July 
1, 1960 and ending June 30, 1961. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 
Baltimore, Maryland 



Maryland State Department of Education 



23 



1961 MARYLAND LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION 

REGULAR SESSION 

School Loans 

Chapter 2, House Bill 82, authorizes a $1,600,000 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Wicomico County. 

Chapter 213, Senate Bill 237, authorizes a $25,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Baltimore City. 

Chapter 216, Senate Bill 343, authorizes a $500,000 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Howard County. 

Chapter 399, Senate Bill 383, authorizes a $3,500,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Harford County. 

Chapter 410, Senate Bill 434, authorizes a $5,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Frederick County. 

Chapter 414, Senate Bill 446, authorizes a $2,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in St. Mary's County. 

Chapter 424, Senate Bill 480, authorizes a $1,500,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Charles County. 

Chapter 432, Senate Bill 556, authorizes the creation of a State debt of 
$20,000,000 to supplement the financing of the construction of public 
school buildings and facilities by the several local political subdivisions 
in the State. 

Chapter 491, House Bill 236, authorizes a $1,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Dorchester County. 

Chapter 515, House Bill 443, authorizes a $10,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Anne Arundel County. 

Chapter 553, House Bill 664, authorizes a $750,000 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Cecil County. 

Chapter 893, House Bill 486, authorizes a $10,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Prince George's County. 

Chapter 901, House Bill 754, authorizes a $506,500 bond issue for school con- 
struction in Caroline Countv. 

Chapter 902, House Bill 807, authorizes a $5,000,000 bond issue for school 
construction in Allegany County. 

Library Legislation 

Chapter 101, House Bill 68, includes certain employees of the Enoch Pratt 
Free Library, the Department of Public Libraries of Montgomery 
County, and the Washington County Free Library in the Teachers' 
Retirement System. 

Chapter 292, Senate Bill 438, authorizes the County Commissioners of Wi- 
comico County to appropriate $50,000 over a five-year period to the 
Wicomico County Free Library, Inc. 

Chapter 896, House Bill 677, authorizes the County Commissioners of Anne 
Arundel County to appropriate $200,000 to finance the construction of 
a public library building and library facilities provided such funds are 
matched by the Annapolis-Anne Arundel Public Library Association. 

Chapter 899, House Bill 697, authorizes the County Commissioners of Charles 
County to appropriate $225,000 to finance the construction of a public 
library building. 

Chapter 904, House Bill 876, authorizes the County Commissioners of Prince 
George's County to appropriate $60,000 to finance the construction of a 
public library building and facilities in the Tenth (Laurel) Election 
District of the County. 

Retirement 

Chapter 111, Senate Bill 9, permits the Board of Trustees of the Teachers' 
Retirement System to set the rate of interest from time to time from a 
minimum of 3 per cent to a maximum of 4 per cent. Said regulation 
applies only to teachers who joined the system on or after July 1, 1955. 



24 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Chapter 112, Senate Bill 10, sets regular interest rates at 4 per cent for those 
persons who were members of the State Employees' Retirement System 
on or before June 30, 1955. It permits the Retirement Board of Trustees 
to set the rate of interest from a minimum of 3 per cent to a maximum 
of 4 per cent. 

Chapter 184, House Bill 352, repeals a set of obsolete local laws for Allegany 
County relating to an old Teachers' Retirement Fund. 

Chapter 191, House Bill 68, (See under "Library Legislation.") 

Chapter 395, Senate Bill 368, permits persons to transfer between actuarial- 
based State pension systems upon paying into their present system 
certain contributions. 

Chapter 563, House Bill 696, authorizes the County Commissioners of Gar- 
rett County to make supplementary retirement payments to certain 
retired public school teachers. 

Chapter 571, House Bill 774, increases the supplementary pensions paid to 
certain retired public school teachers in Baltimore County. The amount 
to be paid is raised from $2,000 to $2,400 per year or 40 per cent of 
their highest average wage during any 5-year period of service, which- 
ever sum is larger. 

Joint Resolution 21, Senate Joint Resolution 31, requests the Legislative 
Council to study the feasibility of the State's undertaking to pay a 
certain part of the contribution of each State employee to the Employee's 
Retirement System. 



General Legislation Affecting Education 

Chapter 26, Senate Resolution 41, urges the State Board of Education to 
revise the oath taken by all public school teachers in the State. 

Chapter 134, Senate Bill 211, authorizes any local board of education in the 
State to establish a community college, defines what constitutes such 
a college, and provides for the administration and financing of these 
colleges. 

Chapter 145, Senate Bill 272, increases the individual allowances from $100 
to $200 per year for members of the Garrett and Wicomico county boards 
of education. 

Chapter 172, House Bill 190, increases the individual expense allowance 
from $100 to $200 per year for members of the Somerset County Board 
of Education. 

Chapter 188, House Bill 8, provides for a deputy State superintendent of 
schools who shall represent the State Superintendent of Schools in the 
latter's absence. 

Chapter 257, House Bill 508, repeals an unnecessary power of the Cecil 
County Board of Education with reference to the sale of certain prop- 
erty to the Jacob Tome Institute, this power having been exercised and 
the action completed. 

Chapter 268, House Bill 70, provides for an increase of $4.00 in the fee for 
motor vehicle instruction and examination permits. The funds thus 
accumulated are to be used by the State Department of Education to 
provide for driver education for public high school students in the 
several political subdivisions. 

Chapter 299, Senate Bill 481, establishes the Charles County Youth Com- 
mission. The Youth Commission is to study the services available to 
and the needs of the youth in the County. The County Superintendent 
of Schools is a regular member of the Commission. 

Chapter 322, Senate Bill 215, provides for the regulation, licensing, and 
bonding of persons engaged in soliciting for certain nonpublic schools. 
All solicitors for nonpublic schools located within or without the State 
are required to apply to the State Superintendent of Schools for an 
annual permit. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



Chapter 349, Senate Bill 505, requires the County Commissioners and the 
Board of Education for Allegany County to provide full educational 
programs and facilities for retarded and handicapped children through 
the school term ending after the eighteenth birthday of such children. 

Chapter 355, Senate Bill 74, provides that all Legislative scholarships to 
be awarded from the Third Legislative District of Baltimore City shall 
be awarded after a competitive examination by officials of the institu- 
tion concerned. 

Chapter 358, Senate Bill 94, authorizes the State Department of Education 
to impose certain restrictions upon degree-granting institutions to pre- 
vent the issuance of substandard degrees. 

Chapter 361, Senate Bill 101, raises the State minimum salary schedule for 
public school teachers from $3200-$5300 to $3600-$5700. The salary 
scale for supervisors is increased from $5400-$6800 to $G200-$7800. Basic 
aid per pupil is increased from $28 to $40, and the local tax rate prerequi- 
site to sharing in the Equalization Fund is raised from 75 cents to 
87 cents on each $100 of assessable property. P'unds received by the 
local units from motor vehicle license fees (A-J) are no longer con- 
sidered in calculation of Equalization and Incentive Funds. The Incen- 
tive Fund is increased from $20 to $22 per pupil. In addition each local 
school system is entitled to receive $70 per pupil for increased enroll- 
ments over the previous year. 

Chapter 373, Senate Bill 212, authorizes the creation of a State debt of 
$5,000,000 to be used exclusively for the ])urpose of supplementing the 
financing of the construction of public community college facilities in 
the several political subdivisions of the State. 

Chapter 374, Senate Bill 221, eliminates the restrictive definition of handi- 
capped children from Section 244 of Article 77. Removal of the restric- 
tive definition will permit the State to assist in paying for the education 
of such children who are over age eighteen. 

Chapter 375, Senate Bill 223, permits the State Board of Education to co- 
operate with other departments and agencies, both public and private, 
in providing vocational rehabilitation and in developing the necessary 
facilities and services. 

Chapter 381, Senate Bill 280, requires certain signalling lights on all new 
vehicles. Stop signals need be visible only from the rear except in the 
case of school buses. 

Chapter 412, Senate Bill 443, creates a State Scholarship Board to adminis- 
ter the proposed Federal Scholarship Program. In addition, 608 general 
State scholarships are established, which program of awards is also to 
be administered by the State Scholarship Board. 

Chapter 429, Senate Bill 519, increases the individual expense allowance 
from $100 to $250 per year for members of the Queen Anne's County 
Board of Education. 

Chapter 430, Senate Bill 535, provides a $500,000 matching State grant to 
Mt. St. Mary's College for construction of a science laboratory. 

Chapter 433, Senate Bill 557, increases the individual expense allowance 
from $100 to $200 per year for members of the Dorchester County Board 
of Education. 

Chapter 451, House Bill 347, inci-eases from 30 to 45 acres the limitation on 
the power of county boards of education to acquire land by condemnation 
for school purposes. 

Chapter 463, House Bill 540, provides for the establishment and operation of 
an Insurance Fund for the rebuilding of county-owned public buildings, 
including school buildings in Prince George's County. 

Chapter 476, House Bill 24, provides that certain unclaimed funds of non- 
residents of the United States shall be paid to the local political subdi- 
visions for the use of the public schools. 

Chapter 493, House Bill 243, provides that members of the instructional staff 
at each of the five State training schools shall not be included in the 
classified service of the State. 



26 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Chapter 519, House Bill 458, authorizes the Superintendent of Schools of 

Prince George's County, the Mai-yland State Police, and/or the Prince 

George's County Police to approve the location of school bus loading 

zones in that County. 
Chapter 525, House Bill 496, provides for public transportation of nonpublic 

school children in Baltimore County. The County board of education is 

authorized to establish new bus routes if necessary. 
Chapter 538, House Bill 569, increases the individual expense allowance from 

$250 to $600 per year for members of the Cecil County Board of 

Education. 

Chapter 549, House Bill 659, increases from $300 to $500 the amount of 

educational assistance which may be paid to certain war orphans by 

the State Board of Education. 
Chapter 552, House Bill 663, authorizes the Cecil County Board of Educa^ 

tion to sell two school properties to the County Commissioners. 
Chapter 592, House Bill 40, amends Section 268 of Article 77 to clarify a 

reference to Maryland State College at Princess Anne, 
Chapter 601, House Bill 201, requires that the Montgomery County public 

school budget be submitted to the County Commissioners at least 45 days 

before the usual date for levying County taxes. 
Chapter 635, Senate Bill 495, authorizes the establishment of the St. Mary's 

County Youth Commission. The Commission is to make provisions for 

the recreational, educational, and health needs of youth in the County. 

The County Superintendent of Schools is a designated member of tlie 

Commission. 

Chapter 657, Senate Bill 362, increases from 6 to 7 the number of members 
on the Baltimore County Board of Education and increases from 3 to 5 
the number of members on the Cecil County Board of Education. 

Chapter 663, Senate Bill 526, requires the Attorney General to review peri- 
odically the surety bonds given by persons accepting scholarships in 
education and to require the Attorney General to take appropriate ac- 
tion should the obligations incurred under the bond not be properly 
discharged. In addition, all such scholarship holders must render the 
promised State service within five years after leaving college. 

Chapter 664, Senate Bill 537, permits legislators and other appointing au- 
thorities to transfer right of appointment to certain State scholarships 
to other legislators and appointing authorities. In addition it requires 
that State scholarships be awarded on or before July 1 of each year. 

Chapter 700, House Bill 251, amends Sections 2(a), (50), and 265 of Article 
66 i to require all vehicles used as school buses to be registered as such 
by the Department of Motor Vehicles. 

Chapter 845, House Bill 853, provides for school crossing guards in Anne 
Arundel County and places them under the supervision of the Board of 
Police Examiners. 

Chapter 867, House Bill 757, repeals an obsolete Charles County law relat- 
ing to the establishment and supervision of McDonogh Institute, the 
manual training school for the County. 

Chapter 885, Senate Bill 196, authorizes the creation of a State debt of 
$18,180,000 for capital impi-ovements, maintenance, and equipment in 
certain State buildings. Funds from this Act are allotted to the five 
State teachers colleges as follows: 



Coppin State Teachers College $ 155,000 

State Teachers College at Bowie 107,700 

State Teachers College at Frostburg 222,300 

State Teachers College at Salisbury 191,000 

State Teachers College at Towson 390,000 



Total $1,066,000 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



Chapter 888, House Bill 16, increases the minimum salary schedule for 
county superintendents of schools from $8000-$10,000 to $10,000-$14,000. 
The County Commissioners of the several counties are given the power 
to approve or disapprove portions of such salaries in excess of the State 
schedule. 

Chapter 889, House Bill 42, amends Section 173 of Article 77 to change 
references to ''normal schools" to "teachers colleges." 

Chapter 907, House Bill 967, increases from $300 to $480 per year the indi- 
vidual expense allowance for members of the Anne Arundel County 
Board of Education. 

Joint Resolution 26, House Joint Resolution 29, i-equests the Governor to 
appoint a commission to study the expansion of public higher education 
in Maryland. 

Joint Resolution 49, House Joint Resolution 9, requests a Commission to 
study the problem of physical fitness of Maryland youth and to make 
recommendations to the State Board of Education. 

SPECIAL SESSION 

Chapter 11, House Bill 3, authorizes a $750,000 bond issue for junior college 
construction in Washington County. 



XiNETi-FiFTH Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MIMTES OF THE STATE BO\RD OF 
EDUCATION AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE STATE 
TEACHERS COUUEGES 

Special Meeting — July 18. 1960 

The Board met in special session to formulate an opinion on 
the subject of financial support for public schools. 

The State Superintendent in an introductory statement re- 
minded the Board that the cooperative study of financing public 
education in the State has been going on for nearly three years 
under the sponsorship of the State Department and the local 
school systems. It has been discussed in meetings of the State 
Board and in meetings all over the State. All the school superin- 
tendents are in favor of the plan proposed. The plan proposed as 
a result of this study, the so-called Mort Plan, reported in detail 
in Education for Our Times, A State Action Program, issued by 
the State Department of Education in May. 1959. merely extends 
the Equalization Plan so that one county may have as good a 
program as another if it makes the same effort. In brief, the 
proposal is that : 

The State should share in the total cost of education as authorized 
by law. 

Each local school system should be able to provide the same quality of 
education for the same tax effort. 

The State's share should avei^g-e approximately 50 per cent on a State- 
wide basis. Each local unit's percentage share will depend on its 
relative tax ability and its educational need. 

The State's share should be based on equalized assessments and on 
equitable measures of need. 

The motion was carried by the Board to accept in principle 
the financial plan as presented, subject to modifications which 
^vill include some tyj^e of flexible minimum and maximum to be 
specifically incorporated following further study and agreement 
by the Board. 

The Board agreed to meet in the evening of August 31, 1960, 
for the purpose of considering the specific proposal for a flexible 
minimum and maximum to be incorporated in the plan. The 
staff of the State Department was asked to prepare a report on 
the plans for the Board's consideration. 

August 31, 1960 

The Board was informed that Bylaw 16 had been reviewed 
by the Assistant Attorney General and found that "it is broad 
enough to permit those counties which keep their financial rec- 
ords on an accrual basis to report on an accrual basis." 

Action of the State Board included : 

Decision that all resolutions of the State Board of Educa- 
tion for formal approval be written in the form of resolutions 
and that each be numbered by year and resolution number. 



Marylaxd State Department of Educatiox 



20 



Appointment of six rather than three committees of the 
State Board to work with the State Superintendent of Education 
and his staff to consider matters and make recommendations to 
the State Board. These committees, each with one member and 
with the President of the Board as ex-officio member of each, 
covered the following- fields — State Department of Education 
headquarters, public schools, higher education — as well as other 
problems involving the educational program beyond the high 
school level — vocational rehabilitation, public libraries, and ad- 
vanced planning. 

Adoption of revised standards for nonpublic schools offering 
instruction in the following specialized areas — art, barbering, 
beauty culture, business, dance, drafting, electronics, flight, 
music, and practical nursing. Following the November 25, 1959, 
meeting of the State Board of Education when General Standards 
for Nonpublic Schools Offering Instructions in Specialized Areas 
were adopted, copies of these standards were distributed to in- 
terested schools. Among the changes proposed in a subsequent 
meeting by representatives of these schools was the desirability 
of presenting all standards applicable to a given type of school 
in one document. The documents were developed in this form. 

Adoption of Marykuid Standards for Nonpuhlic Schools — 
Nursery Schools and Kindergartens, and revocation of all pre- 
viously existing standards applying to nonpublic nursery schools 
and kindergartens. "Proposed Standards for Nonpublic Nursery 
Schools and Kindergartens" had been presented to the Board 
for preliminary review at the meeting in February of 1960. A 
meeting was held with the owners of such schools and their sug- 
gestions were incorporated into the standards. In addition, cer- 
tain changes were made in order to expand and clarify some of 
the sections of the bulletin which had not been thoroughly under- 
stood. 

Approval of the budget requests for Headquarters 
($1,111,842), Vocational Rehabilitation ($1,498,774), and the 
State Teachers Colleges ($6,044,064) amounting to $8,654,680, 
an increase of $2,117,150 over the appropriation for fiscal year. 
1961, 

Approval of the appointment of Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller as 
Supervisor of Special Education, effective September 1, 1960, to 
succeed Dr. Geneva E. Flickinger now Supervisor of Adult Edu- 
cation. 

Approval of a revision of Bylaw 62 which now reads as 
follows: "Only citizens of the United States shall be employed 
as teachers in the public school system in the counties or ad- 
mitted to or be employed by the State Teachers Colleges. For 
good and sufficient reason, however, the State Superintendent of 
Schools, upon request of the local school system, or in the case of 
the State Teachers Colleges, upon the request of the president, 
may make an exception to the provision of this bylaw, but he 
shall report all such exceptions to the State Board of Education." 



30 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Special Meeting — October 11, 1960 

The Board approved with some modification the Balanced 
Partnership (Mort) Plan for financial support of public educa- 
tion in Maryland. This plan is the result of several years of study 
by the superintendents of schools, the State Board of Education, 
the State Department of Education, and lay groups, with Dr. 
Paul R. Mort of Columbia University as consultant. With the 
modification, approved by the Board, State aid would be limited 
in each local school system to support of an expenditure per pupil 
unit not greater than $20 more than the preceding year at what- 
ever per cent as a State-wide average the State Legislature may 
determine. 

Special Meeting — October 26, 1960 

The Board approved a plan, subject to several suggestions 
of its members to be finalized at the November meeting, to make 
a transition to professorial rank in the State teachers colleges. 
This plan resulted from proposals of a committee of State 
teachers college presidents and members of the State Department 
of Education appointed at the request of the State Board to study 
this transition. 

November 30, 1960 

Each member of the Board was given a copy of the revised 
policies on professorial rank at the State teachers colleges, which 
it approved at a special meeting on October 26, 1960, but which 
needed some clarification and rewording. The revised policies 
follow : 

1. That as a general rule not more than 55 per cent of the faculty 
occupy the ranks of Professor and Associate Professor, and that 
not more than 30 per cent of the faculty occupy the rank of Professor 

2. That the criteria be applied to current faculty in determining rank 
status for the year 1961-62, except that retroactive requirements 
such as ''10 hours in the teaching field" and ''Master's plus 45 hours" 
shall not be used in the 1961-62 transition 

3. That in the transition from the 1960-61 scale to the 1961-62 scale, 
each faculty member be guaranteed one increment in the rank to 
which he is transferred 



Criteria for Professorial Rank 

Professor 

1. The earned doctorate, including at least 70 semester hours of credit 
in graduate and undergraduate courses in the subject field which 
the person teaches 

2. Eight years of successful teaching experience, five years of which 
shall be at the college level. In unusual circumstances research or 
other comparable professional activity may be accepted as fulfilling 
a part of the required years of teaching. 

3. Demonstrated proficiency in teaching 

4. Demonstrable evidence of continuing interest in the area of special- 
ization through such activities as scholarly research, productive 
activity, and participation in professional societies 

5. Evidence of superior service in such areas as assuming committee 
responsibilities, working with students individually or in groups, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



performing assigned administrative duties, cooperating effectively 
with professional colleagues, participating and leading in civic and 
community activities 

Associate Professor 

1. Doctor's degree normally required. In unusual circumstances an 
individual may be considered if he has the Master's degree plus 45 
hours in the subject field which he teaches. 

2. Five years of successful teaching experience with at least three 
years at the college level. In unusual circumstances research or 
other comparable professional activity may be accepted as fulfilling 
a part of the required years of teaching. 

3. Demonstrated proficiency in teaching 

4. Demonstrable evidence of continuing interest in the area of special- 
ization through such activities as scholarly research, productive 
activity, and participation in professional societies 

5. Evidence of commendable service with such areas as assuming com- 
mittee responsibilities, working with students individually or in 
groups, performing assigned administrative duties, cooperating 
effectively with professional colleagues, participating and leading 
in civic and community activities 

Assistant Professor 

1. Doctor's degree is desirable. Minimum requirement Master's plus 
30 semester hours in the subject field which the person teaches. 
Under unusual circumstances individuals holding the Master's 
degree may be considered. 

2. Teaching experience is desirable. 

3. Marked growth in quality of teaching 

4. Demonstrable evidence of continued growth in such areas as re- 
search, scholarly activities, and participation in professional 
societies 

5. Evidence of ability and willingness to participate in such areas as 
assuming committee responsibilities, working with students indi- 
vidually or in groups, performing assigned administrative duties, 
cooperating effectively with professional colleagues, participating 
and leading in civic and community activities 

Instructor 

1. Master's degree in the subject field which the person teaches. Under 
unusual circumstances individuals with a Bachelor's degree may be 
considered. 

2. Teaching experience is desirable but not required. 

3. Evidence of potential in college teaching 

4. Demonstrated interest in, and understanding of, scholarly research 
productive activity, and professional societies 

5. Promise of ability and evidence of willingness to participate in such 
areas as assuming committee responsibilities, working with students 
individually or in groups, performing assigned administrative duties, 
cooperating effectively with professional colleagues, participating 
and leading in civic and community activities 

The State Superintendent reported that the Council of Chief 
State School Officers would hold its annual meeting in Baltimore 
during the week of November 5, 1961. The organization is com- 
posed of one school official from each of the fifty states as well as 
Guam, American Samoa, Canal Zone, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin 
Islands. The United States Commissioner of Education and cer- 
tain members of his staff usually are in attendance, as are certain 
representatives from various state departments interested in the 



32 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



subject under discussion. The deliberations of this Council are 
of considerable importance and national concern. 

It is planned that a part of the program will be devoted to a 
study of the organization and operation of the Maryland State 
Department of Education. 

Action of the State Board included : 

Authorization for the State Superintendent to make appoint- 
ments of classified employees to the State Department of Educa- 
tion, subject to final confirmation by the State Board of Educa- 
tion. (Resolution No. 1960-lE) 

Authorization for the State Superintendent to make appoint- 
ments of classified employees to the State teachers colleges, sub- 
ject to final confirmation by the Board of Trustees of the State 
Teachers Colleges. (Resolution No. 1960-lT) 

Approval of professional staff of the State Department of 
Education to pursue such graduate study during the regular 
school year and during summer sessions as may be necessary to 
qualify for higher degrees ; and authorization for the State Super- 
intendent to approve such programs of graduate study and the 
administrative arrangements related thereto upon proper ap- 
plication by a staff member. (Resolution No. 1960-2E) 

Approval of the 1962 consolidated budget request in the 
amount of $117,731,519 which includes the total public school 
budget of $102,210,128. The consolidated request is an increase 
of $5,682,100 over the 1961 appropriation. (Resolution No. 1960- 
3E) 

Authorization for the State Superintendent to initiate a 
study designed to explore the possibility of setting up a State- 
wide system of 12-month employment of selected teachers; the 
funds for making this study to be solicited from a foundation 
interested in such a project; and the local school superintendents, 
the Maryland State Teachers' Association, and the Maryland 
Congress of Parents and Teachers to be fully consulted in con- 
nection with the aforesaid study. (Resolution No. 1960-4E) 



Members of the Board were given copies of the Report on 
Teacher' Education Scholarship Program, 1960. A condensed 
summary follows : 



February 22, 1961 



Number 



1960 



Applicants who took the qualifying test 

Eligible candidates 

Scholarships available 



958 
754 
233 
152 
81 
703 
233 
470 
59 
69 
43 
608 



a. For current phase 



b. For replacements 

Applicants offered scholarships 

Accepting 

Declining — total 

Declining by forfeit 

Declining after acceptance 

Awards made from State-wide eligible list 
Total number of scholarships in force. . . . 



Maryland State Department of Education 33 

Dr. William M. Brish, Chairman of the State Committee on 
Educational Television, submitted to the Board a report: **The 
Use of Television for Instructional Purposes — A Viewpoint." As 
stated in this report: ''Education today faces responsibilities 
that are both old and enduring and new and perplexing. The 
tempo of our way of life has speeded up. We now live in a cul- 
ture that is acquiring new knowledge at a tremendous pace and 
is applying at an ever increasing rate the discoveries of science 
to industry, business, transportation, communication, and to all 
the aspects of everyday living. As a result, many new resources 
have quickly become a regular and accepted part of our lives. 
. . . Do media which have brought about spectacular improve- 
ment in communications have implications for teaching pro- 
cedures and school organization? Can television make a worth- 
while contribution to the education program? Will it help to 
expand the educational opportunities for pupils? Is it a resource 
that can improve the quality of instruction? Not only are ques- 
tions such as these being asked in many school systems all over 
the United States, but many projects, experiments, and studies 
involving the use of television for instruction are actually being 
conducted. These projects vary in size from installations in a 
single school building to a network linking all the schools of a 
large system. As a result, many pupils are now regularly receiv- 
ing some part of their formal education by television." 

Several television projects are now being conducted in Mary- 
land : 

1. The Eastern Shore Project 

2. The Greater Washington Area Project 

3. The Baltimore TV Activities 

4. The Washington County Closed-Circuit Educational Television 
Project 

5. Baltimore County Activities 

In general, the use of television for instructional purposes in 
Maryland and elsewhere indicates that it has both potentials and 
limitations that affect its contribution to the school program and 
that these are an outgrow^th of the nature of the medium itself. 
When television is used, the potentials and limitations indicate 
that: 

a. Thei e must be careful planning by studio teachers, classroom teach- 
ers, and the supervisory statf. 

b. It should be coordinated with the other experiences of the school day. 

c. Pupils need to understand how to use television as an educational 
experience, 

d. The televised lesson should be more than a passive experience for 
the pupil. 

e. New procedures must be developed to handle situations growing 
out of the limitations of television. 

In order to broaden interest among the various school sj^s- 
tems of the State in the use of television for instructional pur- 
poses, the State Committee on Educational Television is prepared 
to offer suggestions or advice to school systems ; provide current 
information about the status of State and national projects; 
participate upon request in local workshops or professional meet- 



34 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



ings ; arrange for demonstrations, visits, or field trips ; hold a 
State-wide meeting for leaders in the various school systems in- 
terested in exchanging views about using television ; and assist 
in developing plans for a State program if it becomes desirable. 

Dr. David W. Zimmerman reported that this committee, 
which is composed of superintendents, supervisors, principals, 
people working directly with educational television projects in 
the State, and representatives of the State Department of Educa- 
tion, was appointed by the State Superintendent of Schools more 
than a year ago and charged with the responsibility of evaluating 
what has been accomplished in this area and developing a point 
of view for the public school systems of the State in order to 
assist them in charting the direction for this new medium of 
education. The State Superintendent pointed out that national 
committees and committees in other states are trying to deter- 
mine the place of educational television in the public school pro- 
gram, that there are many problems in connection with the use of 
television, and that at this time no one is sure which is the best 
procedure. He added that he hoped the State Committee could 
recommend a program which the State Board of Education could 
foster and support after exploring all possibilities. 

The Board agreed that this is an area in which it and the 
State Department of Education should exercise some degree of 
leadership and requested the committee to complete its study as 
soon as possible so that additional studies of costs might be made 
and the Board might make suggestions to the counties for a 
desirable educational television program. 

Dr. Zimmerman reported that he and Dr. Pullen had met 
with Dr. Philip H. Coombs and Dr. Lester A. Nelson of the Fund 
for the Advancement of Education in New York to explore the 
possibilities of a study of better utilization of staff, including 
twelve-month employment of teachers, in the local school systems 
of Maryland and the extent to which the Fund might be inter- 
ested in working with the State Department of Education and 
the local school systems in such a study. Both Dr. Coombs and 
Dr. Nelson indicated that they would be interested in discussing 
this matter with school people in the State, and Dr. Zimmerman 
and Dr. Pullen are now planning a meeting of the State Com- 
mittee on Staff Utilization and the superintendents. 

Action of the State Board included : 

Approval and adoption of the revision of Maryland stand- 
ards for community and junior colleges. (Resolution No. 1961- 
lE) 

Approval in principle of certain items from the proposed re- 
quirements for certification of teachers. This action was taken 
in view of the fact that local school superintendents are now re- 
cruiting teachers for another year. The proposed requirements 
for the certification of teachers were presented to the Board at 
its November, 1960, meeting. Revisions have been made since that 
time, and these proposals, which provide a basic plan for certifi- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



cation, were given to the members of the Board, with the sugges- 
tion that possibly sometime in the early part of April a special 
meeting be held to consider them, since the members of the Board 
had not had an opportunity to study them carefully prior to this 
meeting. 

The State Superintendent reported that he had presented to 
the school superintendents at their meeting on December 16, 
1960, a clarifying opinion concerning the purpose and use of 
cumulative records of pupil progress. At his request, the Board 
approved the incorporation of this statement into the minutes of 
the State Board of Education so that it may be a matter of public 
record. The statement follows : 

The public school system is dedicated to the purpose of providing 
the best possible educational program for each individual pupil. This 
program is developed on the basis of comprehensive information con- 
cerning the ability, interests, and needs of the pupil. A good teacher 
must know and understand each pupil he teaches in order to help the 
pupil learn successfully. A system of cumulative records, including 
progress reports, subject grades, test scores, medical records, psycho- 
logical reports, and selective guidance notes, is necessary in order to 
provide for the systematic gathering and use of information concerning 
the pupil. Accordingly, the State Board of Education has prescribed 
certain uniform record forms to be used by the local school systems in 
setting up such a system, for pupils. These forms and the manual for 
their use were developed by the staff of the State Department of 
Education in cooperation with representatives from each local school 
system. 

In helping the pupil to learn, the teachers and other school per- 
sonnel work closely with parents, interpreting to them information 
about the pupil's ability and achievement in school and receiving in 
turn information about the pupil's development which the parents 
think may be helpful. The pupil's cumulative records may be used as 
a basis for mutual exchange of information with parents and are avail- 
able to the parents or legal guardians for discussion in a conference 
with appropriate school personnel. School administrators and teachers 
recognize that in the education of children they act as the agent of the 
parents or legal guardians and that parents or legal guardians are 
entitled to full information about the child. Indeed the best interests 
of the child can be served by the full cooperation of parent and school. 

Special Meeting; — April 19, 1961 

Mr. Wilbur S. Hoopengardner, chairman of the Superin- 
tendents' Committee on Certification, led the discussion of the 
''Proposed Requirements for Certification" as revised through 
February 22, 1961. At the February meeting the Board requested 
that the proposed requirements be sent to the local school super- 
intendents, with the request that they discuss them with the 
members of their local boards of education. At its February 
meeting the Board had also approved in principle, because of the 
time element, the section of the requirements headed ''Based on 
Credit." 

The Board gave general approval in principle to the plan as 
presented in the certification report. Prior to the May meeting 
when this subject would also be considered, three Board mem- 



36 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



bers were requested to meet with the Superintendents' Com- 
mittee on Certification to revise the material in light of the 
discussion of this special meeting and in light of any further 
questions the members of the Board might direct to this special 
committee. 

May 31, 1961 

In the annual election of officers of the State Board of 
Education, Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., was re-elected president. 
Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, a member of the State Board since 1956, 
was elected vice-president, succeeding Mr. George C. Rhoderick, 
Jr., whose term expired. Mr. C. William Hetzer of Williamsport 
was appointed by the Governor to succeed Mr. Rhoderick. The 
Board adopted the following resolution on Mr. Rhoderick : 

Resolution on Mr. George C. Rhoderick, Jr. 

The State Board of Education wishes to express its sincere regret 
upon the retirement of Mr. George C. Rhoderick, Jr., as a mem- 
ber of the Board and as its vice-president. The Board desires to have 
recorded in its minutes this expression of the high regard and respect 
which its members have accorded him since he first became a member 
of that body. 

Mr. Rhoderick has been diligent and untiring in carrying out his 
duties as a member of the Board. Therefore, in consideration of his 
outstanding abilities and accomplishments, the Board wishes to extend 
its warm appreciation to him for his services to public education in 
Maryland during the past four years. 

George C. Rhoderick, Jr., was born in Middletown, Maryland, 
on July 26, 1895. In 1914 he was graduated from Middletown High 
School. He entered The Johns Hopkins University College of En- 
gineering in 1915. In 1918 he was accepted for military service and was 
sent to Kelley Field, Texas, where he taught in radio school for the 
duration of the First World War. 

Mr. Rhoderick is sole ov^^ner of a publishing business in Middle- 
town which includes three weekly newspapers. The Valley Register, 
Middletown; Community Reporter, Mt. Airy; and Catoctin Enteiyrise, 
Thurmont. 

In 1936 Mr. Rhoderick was appointed to the Frederick County 
Board of Education where he served with distinction for eighteen years. 
He was president of the Board for nine years, and under his direction 
the excellent system of modern public schools in the county began to 
evolve. 

At the present time, Mr. Rhoderick is a member of the Governor's 
Maryland Civil War Centennial Commission and is active in many areas 
of community service and welfare. He has given unstintingly of his 
time and energy to many such public endeavors. 

The members of the State Board of Education are indeed grateful 
to Mr. Rhoderick for the unique contributions he has made on behalf 
of public education in Maryland and again wish to express their deep 
regret upon his retirement from their membership. 

The State Superintendent presented to the Board an opinion 
dated March 8, 1961, by the Assistant Attorney General, James 
0' C. Gentry, which states: "At your request I have reviewed 
Section 165 of Article 77 which provides, 'the Board of Trustees 
shall authorize the course or courses of studies to be offered, in- 
cluding courses for observation and practice in teaching.' This 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



office is of the opinion that the above provision merely requires 
that the Board of Trustees authorize the general or over-all pro- 
gram of study, not the specific subjects to be taught." 

The State Superintendent announced officially the accredita- 
tion of the State Teachers College at Bowie by the Middle States 
Association. 

The State Board approved the request of Dr. William E. 
Henry, President of Bowie, in accordance with the desire of his 
faculty and students, that the new Laboratory School at Bowie be 
named in honor of the late Charlotte B. Robinson, music in- 
structor at the college for thirty-seven years. 

Other action of the State Board included : 

Appointment of Dr. David W. Zimmerman to the position of 
Deputy State Superintendent of Schools, effective June 1, 1961. 

Dr. Zimmerman was made Assistant Superintendent in 
Finance and Research on March 1, 1950, and on August 31, 1955, 
his title was changed to Assistant State Superintendent and his 
duties broadened. The Attorney General ruled on October 26, 
1959, that the Assistant State Superintendent of Schools, by vir- 
tue of Section 46, Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 
is de facto the deputy of the State Superintendent of Schools. The 
General Assembly of 1961 changed Section 46 so as to authorize 
the title of Deputy State Superintendent of Schools. 

Adoption of amendments to the State Plan for Further Ex- 
tension of Library Services to Rural Areas — Resolution No. 1961- 
3E (See section on Division of Library Extension for further 
details.) 

Grant to the University of Baltimore full authority to award 
the Bachelor of Arts degree to qualified candidates. (Resolution 
No. 1961-4E) 

Grant to Xaverian College, Silver Spring, full authority to 
award the Associate in Arts degree to qualified candidates. 
(Resolution No. 1961-5E) 

Approval of the new ''Requirements for Teacher Certifica- 
tion" — Resolution No. 1961-6E. (See section on Certification for 
further details.) 

Prior to this action, Mr. Wilbur S. Hoopengardner, Chair- 
man of the Superintendents' Committee on Certification, re- 
minded the Board that at the special meeting of April 19, it had 
discussed the ''Proposed Requirements for Certification" as re- 
vised through February 22, 1961, and had given general approval 
in principle to the plan as presented in the report. However, the 
Board had made suggestions concerning the report, and a com- 
mittee of the Board had been appointed to meet with the Super- 
intendents' Committee on Certification to revise the material in 
the light of the discussion. The committee held two meetings to 
consider a draft of a revised report. Mr. H. Orville Berwick re- 
ported that the Committee on Teacher Education and Profes- 
sional Standards of the State Teachers' Association had approved 



38 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



the proposed requirements in principle. The State Superin- 
tendent cautioned the Board that it is not possible to make an 
instrumentality such as this perfect in the beginning and that 
from time to time it might be necessary for the State Superin- 
tendent to ask the Board to make modifications in the require- 
ments. 

Repeal of Bylaw 16 which required each county board of edu- 
cation to go beyond the requirements of Section 72 of Article 77 
by preparing a statement of receipts and expenditures by in- 
dividual schools. Section 72 requires each county board of educa- 
tion to publish and distribute an annual report on the condition 
and needs of each respective local school svstem. (Resolution 
No. 1961-8E) 

As the Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges, ap- 
proval of the 1963-1967 capital improvements budget in the 
amount of $21,807,490 which includes sub-budget totals for each 
of the five State teachers colleges. (Resolution No. 1961-lT) 

As the Board of Trustees, authorization for each of the presi- 
dents of the State teachers colleges to require all students to pay 
a curriculum fee of $10 per semester. (Resolution No. 1961-3T) 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accredita- 
tion for the year 1960-61 may be reported generally under six 
broad headings : 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation of educational programs 

3. School plant planning 

4. High school equivalence certificates 

5. School lunch program 

6. Teacher recruitment 

Certification 

As will be seen from TABLE 49, page 123, the number of cer- 
tificates issued to teachers, supervisors, and administrators dur- 
ing the academic year 1960-61 has continued to increase. In 1959- 
60 there were 4,407 certificates of all types issued, while in the 
academic year 1960-61 there were 5,124 certificates issued in the 
over-all certification of teachers for the State. Since there were 
within the counties of Maryland 1,306 more teachers emploved in 
1960-61 than in 1959-60, while only 717 additional certificates 
were issued, there is an indication that the percentage of teacher 
turnover continues to show some decrease for the State as a 
whole. Of the total number of certificates issued, 2,329 were 
emergency or other substandard certificates, while 2,795 certifi- 
cates were issued to teachers who had full qualifications for regu- 
lar certification. Thus it can be seen that 45.5 per cent of the 
certificates issued were based upon qualifications which failed to 
meet the full requirements for regular certification. However, of 
the 2,329 teachers who were issued emergency or other substand- 
ard certificates, 1,659 had met the requirements for the bac- 
calaureate degree. Over the past several years the percentage of 
teachers issued emergency or other substandard certificates but 
who held college degrees has ranged from 60 to 70 per cent. For 
the year 1960-61 this percentage is 71.2. Some teachers in this 
category have excellent qualifications and some have actually 
met Maryland's requirements for a regular certificate but have 
engaged in no recent formal study. Others have good subject 
matter preparation but lack some of the necessary professional 
preparation required for full certification. Any holder of the 
emergency or provisional degree certificate can usually with rela- 
tively little effort qualify for regular certification in one of the 
various teaching fields. 

On May 31, 1961, the State Board of Education adopted new 
basic certification requirements designated as Bylaw 77. Pro- 
posals for revision of the requirements for special teaching areas 
were also developed and are under further study by various 
groups and will probably be adopted during the 1961-62 school 
year. Among the changes in certification procedures adopted, two 



40 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



new approaches to certification are particularly significant. 
Graduates of institutions accredited by the National Council for 
the Accreditation of Teacher Education who are recommended 
by the college may be issued a Standard Professional Certificate 
without reference to the detailed course work included in the 
students' college programs. Reciprocity with states within the 
Northeast Reciprocity Compact Area for the issuance of the 
Standard Professional Certificate at both the elementary and 
secondary levels has also been provided. 

Accreditation 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

Two new junior college programs were given initial ap- 
proval to operate in the State during the past academic year. One 
institution, formerly offering baccalaureate degrees in Law and 
Commerce only, was given conditional approval for the issuance 
of the B.A. degree, subject to review within a three-year period. 
Approval for the awarding of the Associate in Arts degree was 
granted to one nonpublic junior college. 

Members of the Department served on the committee of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
which re-evaluated former accreditation of one college of the 
State. One additional State institution was given initial accredi- 
tation by Middle States during the academic year as a result of a 
review of progress on recommendations made in a previous evalu- 
ation. The Department reviewed the proposed program for two 
prospective institutions at college or university level on which 
action was withheld pending further development of the plans for 
operation. 

During the academic year the Maryland State Board of Edu- 
cation approved programs for the preparation of secondary 
school teachers at three of the State teachers colleges. The State 
Board of Education also approved the awarding of Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees to nonteacher education 
students for the three above-mentioned State teachers colleges. 
During the year the teachers colleges have continued study and 
development of the curriculum in order to meet present needs. At 
the close of the academic year the State-approved colleges and 
universities could be classified as follows: 15 two-year colleges 
and 29 four-year colleges and universities, 21 of which were 
approved for teacher education. 

Nonpublic Academic Schools Below College Level 

The number and kind of academic schools below college level 
which were operating in the State in 1960-61 and which had been 
approved by the Department were as follows : 



Maryland State Department of Education 41 

Type of School Number 

Secondary 52 

Secondary-Elementary 8 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten 1 

Secondary-Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery 

School 1 

Tutoring 6 

Special 18 

Elementary 4 

Elementary-Kindergarten 5 

Elementary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 4 

Primary 1 

Primary-Kindergarten 5 

Primary-Kindergarten-Nursery School 4 

Kindergarten 37 

Kindergarten-Nursery School 19 

Nursery School 32 

Total 197 



Nonpublic Secondary Schools 

On the approved list of nonpublic academic secondary 
schools there are 62 regular secondary schools and 6 tutoring 
schools. Of these 68 schools, 45 were church-operated and 23 
were privately operated. There are other nonpublic schools in 
Maryland which are not on the list since church-operated schools 
and private schools which have a charter from the Maryland 
Assembly are exempt from approval requirements ; however, any 
of these institutions may request approval of the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools at their discretion. 

Nonpublic Nurj;er,^ Schools, Kindergartens, Elenienlary Schools, 
and Special schools 

These schools are operating in the following ways : 



Cooperatives with parents participating 34 

Cooperatives administered by parents who do not i)articipate 

daily 12 

Smaller centers (3 groups or less) 36 

Larger centers (more than 3 groups), owned by individuals. 10 
Schools governed by board of directors (two of these centers 

offer a summer program) 28 

Church-sponsored centers 6 

Others (sponsored by housing projects, civic groups, colleges, 

etc.) 15 

Total 141 



There were 20 centers which provided, in addition to an 
educational program, a service for the full-day care of children 
of working parents. Twelve of these centers were approved in 
January, 1948, when the law requiring approval went into effect. 
Enrollment in the nonpublic elementary and preschool centers 



42 



NiNETY-P'iFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



during the two years 1959-60 and 1960-61, including new schools 
approved during each of these years were as follows : 



Enrollment * 

Type of School 1959-60 1960-61 

Nursery schools 1,938 1,888 

Kindergartens 2,383 2,34r) 

Elementary schools 3,051 f 3,122 

Special schools 621 839 

Total 7,993 $8,194 



* Figures are those for all schools listed as operating during- the 
year, including- new schools and those removed from list during year 
and closed at end of year. 

t In the five schools terminating at eighth grade there were 181 
children enrolled. 

t In the total enrollment there were 1,338 day-care children en- 
rolled. Actually the total number of children attending centers where 
a day-care program is operated as a part of that center in addition 
to the approved part of the program is appreciably larger than the 
figure of 1,338. Many of the centers do not include in their annual 
reports the enrollment figures for children in the unapproved part 
of the operation. 



Nonpublic Specialized Schools 

In this classification eight schools applied for approval and 
received certificates and 28 schools received tentative approvals. 
Thirty-one schools closed in the period July 1, 1959, to June 30, 
1960. During the period of this report consultants were engaged 
in connection with the approval of electronics courses and courses 
in automation. Experts from television stations, industry, the 
Federal Communications Commission, and the Johns Hopkins 
Research Laboratories were among those consulted. In August 
of 1960 the State Board of Education approved the revised stand- 
ards for nonpublic specialized schools. At the same time teacher 
certification standards were approved. In the spring of 1961 the 
Legislature passed legislation requiring the licensing of solicitors 
for certain nonpublic schools. Standards have been developed for 
use in the licensing of solicitors and are awaiting final approval 
of the State Law Department and the State Superintendent of 
Schools. During the year new legislation pertaining to the opera- 
tion of schools in beauty culture was enacted. In May of 1961 a 
State-wide meeting of beauty school owners and operators was 
held under the sponsorship of the Department for the purpose of 
study of the new legislation and discussion of operating pro- 
cedures resulting therefrom. A representative of the Division 
attended the annual convention of the National Association of 
State Approval agencies in Charleston, South Carolina. During 
the academic year July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961, approximately 
32,600 students were enrolled in the nonpublic specialized schools 
and approximately 1,000 teachers were employed in these schools. 



Maryland State Department of Educatiox 



43 



High School Equivalence 

As of June 30, 1961, the equivalence program completed its 
twentieth year. At the close of the first ten-year period, June, 
1951, approximately 7,000 certificates had been issued. The 
number more than doubled during the next ten-year period and 
now totals 23,520. 

Several business firms and industrial plants are offering 
study courses to prepare employees for the examination, and at 
the penal institutions, where courses are offered as rehabilitation 
therapy, a special examination is given at least once annually. 

School Plant Planning 

During the past year the Assistant Director of the Division 
examined and recommended for approval the following: 

Sites 45 Contracts 100 

Preliminary plans 113 Deeds, right of ways, etc . 128 

Final plans 96 Change orders 332 

Consultative services were provided by the Division to super- 
intendents and architects in the broad aspects of school plant 
planning. The Assistant Director of the Division also served as 
coordinator of the teachers college construction program, work- 
ing with the college presidents and various State agencies in 
developing master plans, immediate and long-range capital pro- 
grams and budgets, educational specifications, and architectural 
planning for individual buildings and the supervision of their 
construction. 

Teacher Recruitment 

During the 1960-61 school year the public schools of Mary- 
land required a total of 1,413 high school teachers in the various 
subject areas to fill vacant positions and to staff new classrooms. 
However, the teacher preparation institutions of the State were 
able to supply only 749 teacher graduates to meet that demand. 
The most severe shortages continued to exist in the fields of 
mathematics and the physical sciences. During the same period, 
the public schools needed 1,270 elementary teachers to staff their 
classrooms. A total of 553 prospective teachers were graduated 
from State colleges and universities in June, 1960. As in the past, 
the shortages in teaching personnel, on both the high and ele- 
mentary school levels, were met by recruiting out-of-State 
teachers, former teachers, and by employing teachers with emer- 
gency or provisional certificates. 



44 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Teacher Education Scholarship Program 

The 1960 Teacher Education Scholarship examination was 
administered on Saturday, February 27, 1960, in twenty-five 
State-wide test centers. For the first time since 1957 the same 
examination was used for both the Teacher Education Scholar- 
ship Program and the General Scholarship Program. Students 
made their choice of scholarship at the time of registration. 

Pre-test registration indicated that 1,847 students were in- 
terested in sitting for the examination. The test was actually 
administered to 1,548 students at the various test centers. A 
breakdown of the registration data for the 1,548 students is as 
follows : 



Type of Registration No. 

Teacher Education only 468 

Senatorial only 590 

Teacher Education and Senatorial 490 



1,548 

Total Teacher Education 958 



Of the 958 Teacher Education candidates 754, or 79 per cent, 
were placed on the eligible list. 

The first scholarship offers were sent out on April 4, 1960, 
including scholarship openings accrued from previous years. A 
total of 233 Teacher Education scholarships were available for 
distribution. Of the 754 eligible candidates, 703 were offered 
scholarships. Two hundred thirty-three students accepted and 
470 declined. Sixty-three of those declining did so by forfeit, and 
69 declined after having previously indicated acceptance of the 
offer. 

The 1960 phase of the Teacher Education Scholarship Pro- 
gram was terminated on November 28, 1960, when acceptance of 
the final award was received by the Department. 

Driver Education 

The 1961 session of the Maryland General Assembly enacted 
legislation which will provide special financial support for public 
school driver education programs. It is believed that this legis- 
lation will have a most salutary effect on the quantitative and 
qualitative growth of driver education programs in this State. 

School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

Program 

School Lunch and Special Milk Programs 

To insure the lowest possible distributive cost to the schools 
participating in the School Lunch and Special Milk Programs, 
reimbursements were paid during the 1960-61 school year on the 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



applicable fraction of a cent. The desired result in that dis- 
tributor cost of milk remained more stable was achieved. For the 
most part there was also a decrease in distributor costs of milk 
to the schools. State-wide, there was a 5.2 per cent increase in 
participation in the Special Milk Program in 1960-61 over 1959- 
60. For the School Lunch Program there was a State-wide in- 
crease of 8.7 per cent in participation over the previous year. 
With the exception of two counties, all counties and Baltimore 
City shared in this increase in participation. Due to the increased 
participation it was necessary to reduce the rate of reimburse- 
ment to the local school units from $.04 to $.025, effective April 1, 
1961. A later supplementary payment was made to the local 
units, and the over-all reimbursement per lunch for the entire 
year was approximately $.0375. 

Direct Distribution of Commodities Program 

For the school year July 1, 1960, to June 30, 1961, 851 
schools participated in the program of distribution of U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture donated commodities. This program was 
administered and supervised through the local boards of educa- 
tion and through direct contact with the participating nonpublic 
schools. Current agreements covering the distribution of U. S. 
Department of Agriculture donated commodities were renewed 
except for the agreement with the Department of Catholic 
Education. In the interest of more direct and less complicated 
administrative procedures in handling the work with the schools 
of the Baltimore Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church, indi- 
vidual agreements were obtained from the schools formerly 
sponsored and administered through the Department of Catholic 
Education. 

Foods were distributed to all eligible schools and school sys- 
tems based on average daily participation, inventories on hand at 
the local level, and knowledge of past experiences in utilization. 



46 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



division of instruction 

Supervisory Assistance to the Counties and to Individual 
Schools in the Areas of Organization, Administration, 
AND Instruction 

The annual Maryland Conference on Secondary Education, 
attended by high school supervisors and principals from all local 
units, was held on March 23 and 24, 1961. Dr. Jerome S. Bruner, 
Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, set the stage for 
the conference in the opening session when he discussed recently 
developed concepts of the psychology of learning. In subsequent 
sessions, applications of these principles were developed in the 
fields of English, mathematics, and the fine arts. Panel discus- 
sions in each of these areas were stimulated by nationally known 
authorities including Dr. Joseph Mersand, Past President of the 
National Council of Teachers of English; Dr. Howard 0. Fehr, 
Head of the Department of Teachers of Mathematics, Teachers 
College, Columbia University; and Dr. Edwin Ziegfield, Head of 
the Department of Fine and Industrial Arts, Teachers College, 
Columbia University. 

The Maryland Conference on Elementary Education, which 
was held this year on April 13 and 14, 1961, is one means by 
which supervisors and administrators in the State keep abreast 
with new developments in the elementary school. The speakers, 
all eminent educators actively engaged in study and revision of 
elementary school programs, gave the newest developments in 
selection of subject matter and the organization of schools for 
most effective learning. Specific subject areas receiving special 
emphasis at this Conference were social studies, language arts, 
science, and mathematics. 

Revision of Curriculum 

Revision of curriculum continues to be a major concern in 
practically all of the school systems. This year many of the 
counties continued revision of the elementary school social studies 
courses. This was usually done with careful study of the high 
school program in order that the result might be a continuous 
sequence from grade one through grade twelve. Particular atten- 
tion is being directed to concepts and values relating to conserva- 
tion of resources, world interdependence, dignity and worth of 
the individual, and responsibility for achieving democratic 
action. There is also much emphasis on broadening the content 
to include the geographical, economical, political, historical, and 
cultural aspects of each problem selected for study. 

Science and mathematics courses for all grades are also re- 
ceiving considerable attention in most school systems. 

Language arts continues to receive attention in many of the 
systems. New procedures and materials are being used in teach- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



ing pupils to read. Most systems recognize the ever present need 
to place more emphasis on oral and written English. 

Assistance in Accreditation 

Individual high schools scheduled for evaluation by the 
regional accrediting association were assisted in their prepara- 
tions for this service. Also, two members of the Department staff 
participated on invitation of one local unit on a committee to con- 
duct a detailed evaluation of a junior high school in that school 
system. 

Along with helping the high schools in preparing for their 
evaluation, the Division assisted with several less formalized 
evaluations. Using the Boston Elementary Evaluative Criteria 
several elementary schools w^ere evaluated in St. Mary's and Anne 
Arundel counties. There were special projects carried out by 
using the services of a number of State supervisors plus several 
local supervisors and local elementary school principals to form 
a visiting committee. These committees spent two days in each 
school and then gave written reports including commendations 
and recommendations for the particular school's use. 

In-service Education of Teachers 

Programs for the in-service education of principals, teachers, 
and other local staff members were marked by their variety and 
number during the year. Most of these programs were for sev- 
eral days' duration. 

All the local systems recognize the value of in-service educa- 
tion for teachers. Such education involves teachers in course of 
study revision, in study, in experimentation, in working with 
specialists, and in evolving new and better techniques of teach- 
ing. The practice of giving school time for in-service education 
is growing; some systems give one half day per month, others 
three or more days each school year. Many systems use the last 
two weeks in June for in-service work. 

The child study program continues as a phase of the in- 
service programs for the teachers in the State. In many instances 
the responsibility of leadership for the program has now been 
assumed by the local school systems. The State Department of 
Education provided consultant service from the Child Study In- 
stitute at the University of Maryland to four local school systems. 
There is need to encourage a renewed interest in child study. Op- 
portunities are being provided for the many new teachers who 
have entered the local school systems in the past five years to get 
information on child growth and development and the techniques 
for understanding the pupils in their classrooms. 

Interest continues in the changing emphasis in mathematics, 
and again particular attention was focused on the improvement 
of the teaching of arithmetic in the elementary school. During 



48 



NiNETY-FiFTii Annual Report 



June a series of two-week workshops for classroom teachers were 
sponsored by this Department. One workshop was held in Salis- 
bury for all teachers of the first, second, and third grades in 
Wicomico and Somerset counties ; another was held in Snow Hill 
for Worcester County. Both of these followed last year's work- 
shop on general content and this year the emphasis was on the 
content for the primary grades with much consideration and 
thought given to procedures and materials. A third workshop 
for elementary and junior high school teachers of Allegany and 
Garrett counties was held at the State Teachers College at Frost- 
burg. The purpose was to develop a better understanding of some 
of the basic principles of mathematics that are required in teach- 
ing the newer materials in arithmetic. As knowledge and uses of 
mathematics develop and changes in curriculum are proposed, the 
need for more in-service education will continue to increase. 

A two-week institute on elementary school mathematics for 
principals, supervisors, and administrators sponsored coopera- 
tively by this Department and Anne Arundel County was held at 
the Severna Park High School in Anne Arundel County. The 
consultant-lecturers for the workshop were mathematicians and 
psychologists directly involved in the outstanding experimental 
mathematics projects currently being conducted in this country. 
More than 175 participants from 19 local school systems and 
teacher-training institutions attended. 

The Use of Television in Instruction 

Television continues to be used as a means of enriching class- 
room activities and also in direct teaching, especially in art, 
music, French, and science. The programs in the State, with the 
exception of the nationally known experiment in Washington 
County, are telecast from local commercial stations in Baltimore 
City, Washington, D. C, and Salisbury. These programs are 
watched not only by the pupils in the classrooms but also by par- 
ents. Direct teaching has as its *'raison d'etre" the fact that many 
elementary teachers at the present time need additional informa- 
tion and skills in some subjects such as a foreign language, music, 
and art ; and local school systems cannot furnish all of the special 
teachers needed in these areas. 

The television teacher can be a specialist in the subject with 
time to develop lesson materials and procedures and thus is able 
to present rich and varied lessons. As the programs have pro- 
gressed, however, it has become apparent that success with this 
medium is in the hands of the regular classroom teacher. Pupils, 
if they are to really profit by television, do not just "watch" a 
program ; there must be preparation for each lesson and constant 
follow-up. This requires a technique on the part of the classroom 
teacher new and different from that usually followed when he is 
in direct control of material to be presented to the class. It also 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



requires a way of learning on the part of the pupil which is dif- 
ferent from that when he is face to face with his instructor. 

State-wide Studies 

Members of the Division of Instruction were actively in- 
volved, along with professional representatives from the local 
units, in a number of State-wide studies which were initiated, 
continued, or concluded during the past year. Of paramount im- 
portance among these was the completion of the report of the 
State Committee to Study Maryland Public Secondary Schools 
under the chairmanship of Dr. David W. Zimmerman, Deputy 
State Superintendent of Schools. This report, the result of a two- 
year, comprehensive analysis of the State's high school program, 
will be distributed locally in the fall of 1961 for critical study by 
superintendents, central staff members, high school principals 
and teachers, teacher-training institutions, boards of education, 
and interested citizens. Based upon a revised expression of philo- 
sophical beliefs and objectives and in the light of the current 
major controversies in secondary education, it presents principles 
and policies for the guidance of local school systems in the organ- 
ization, administration, and services of their schools, including 
detailed treatments of each area of the curriculum. Contributing 
to the preparation of this report, in addition to members of the 
Department staff, were representatives from each of the twenty- 
four local school systems. 

Consultant service was rendered by Dr. Matthew P. Gaffney, 
formerly Larsen Professor of Education, Harvard University; 
Dr. Will French, Emeritus Professor of Education, Teachers 
College, Columbia University; Dr. William T. Gruhn, Professor 
of Education, University of Connecticut ; and Mr. Harry Spencer, 
Director of Instruction, Floral Park, New York. Dr. Vernon 
Anderson, Dean of the College of Education, University of Mary- 
land, and Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, President, State Teachers College 
at Salisbury, met frequently with the Committee and provided 
invaluable assistance. 

A related report on high school standards, designed to com- 
plement the foregoing, is now in the process of preparation by a 
second State Committee appointed in the spring of 1961. It is 
anticipated that this report will be ready for initial release in 
about one year. 

In striving for an effective educational program there is need 
to examine constantly what all of the schools are doing and to 
make revisions which more nearly meet changing economic, po- 
litical, and social conditions. It seems appropriate at this time to 
make a State-wide study of elementary schools and to give careful 
thought to goals, principles of learning, the nature of the ele- 
mentary school child, and the learning he needs for the world in 
which he is living and will live in the future. A steering com- 
mittee composed of supervisors, principals, members of the 



50 



NiNETY-FiFTii Annual Report 



Division of Instruction at the State Department of Education, 
and the Maryland Superintendents Committee on Supervision 
and Curriculum was organized this year. This committee has 
drafted tentative plans for a study of elementary schools which 
should get under way in 1961-62. 

Consultative Services and Cooperation in Curriculum 
Development and in the Development and 
Improvement of Materials of Instruction 

In addition to the assistance rendered to the local school sys- 
tems by members of the Division of Instruction, arrangements 
were made with colleges and other agencies both in and out of 
the State to have resource people with highly specialized knowl- 
edge and skill serve as consultants. By this means more and 
better consultant service for teachers was provided in literature, 
language arts, social studies, science, and other areas. In addi- 
tion to regional meetings, consultants worked with many individ- 
ual school systems in the areas of language arts, mathematics, 
and social studies. 

One of the highly important activities this year has been the 
improvement of science education in grades one through twelve. 
This included working with high school science teachers in class- 
room observations and faculty meetings, assisting in the selection 
of science equipment and the development of science projects 
for school science fairs, providing for county and school groups 
other consultant help in science, and attending county and re- 
gional conferences for science teachers. 

At the elementary level lectures and demonstrations on the 
teaching of science have been given. The supervisors have served 
as consultants for a number of school committees working on 
elementary science, planning school science fairs, and demon- 
strating how to use science kits and science tables to improve 
learning in science. 

The New Curriculum Center 

Considerable time was spent in organizing curriculum ma- 
terials at the Division of Library Extension for the new State 
Curriculum Center. The State Committee for the Curriculum 
Center met a number of times to consider the following : 

Definition of the Curriculum Center 
Persons to be Served 
Materials in the Center 
Services of the Center 
Personnel of the Center 

Improvement of Curriculum Materials 

The new bulletin, Music in Our Maryland Schools, was pub- 
lished and introduced in numerous counties. Meetings were held 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



in three areas of the State (Eastern Shore, Tri-counties, Howard 
County) to introduce this bulletin to teachers, principals, and 
supervisors. Consultants and members of the State Music Com- 
mittee presented the philosophy of the teaching of music in Mary- 
land public schools and suggestions of ways to implement the use 
of the bulletin. 

The fourth book of the Conservation Series, Maryland' s 
Rocks and Minerals, went to press. A script of 'The Geology of 
Maryland," which will supplement Maryland' s Rocks and Min- 
erals in both filmstrip and slide form, was prepared. The com- 
mentary is both printed and in tape recording form. 

An Audiovisual Catalogue consisting of the audiovisual ma- 
terials housed in the new State Curriculum Center w^as prepared 
and is being printed. 

A meeting of the State Coordinating Committee was held to 
evaluate materials for the 1961 List I, the Supplement, List II, 
and to discuss distribution policies. The group agreed that List 
II should be revised and should consist of materials which were 
developed by the Maryland non-State agencies and were useful to 
schools. 

The Baltimore Sunpapers continued to supply each of the 23 
county boards of education and this Department with free 
monthly prints (September until June) of the news film ''Screen 
News Digest." 

The Baltimore News-Post continued to sponsor free monthly 
prints of the Current Affairs Filmstrips to the junior and senior 
high schools of Baltimore, Harford, Anne Arundel, and Howard 
counties and Baltimore City. 

Health and Physical Education 

In addition to rendering usual services to school units 
through workshops, conferences, and visitations, the Supervisor 
of Physical Education and Recreation served on an Elementary 
School Playground Committee in Montgomery County and a com- 
mittee that is evaluating the physical education, interschool and 
intramural programs in Baltimore County. He also worked 
closely with the State Committee to Study the Maryland Public 
Secondary Schools and a subcommittee of the Maryland Asso- 
ciation for Health, Physical Education and Recreation to study 
time allocation given to physical education in all Maryland po- 
litical subdivisions. 

Plans were completed by Towson and Frostburg State 
Teachers Colleges for instituting major programs in secondary 
school physical education in the fall of 1961. At present Mary- 
land schools are experiencing a critical shortage of trained 
women physical education teachers. It is hoped the two new 
Maryland college training programs will in time meet most of the 
need. 



52 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Health 

As co-chairman of the Maryland State School Health Coun- 
cil, the Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation assisted 
a subcommittee in studying and making recommendations con- 
cerning the law which requires an annual census of handicapped 
children. The report of the subcommittee has been submitted to 
the State Superintendent of Schools. 

Tiitersohool Sporls 

A subcommittee of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools 
Athletic Association completed an evaluation study of the struc- 
ture, organization, and activities of the Association. The purpose 
was to improve the State high school athletic program. 

The Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation served 
as Health Chairman of the Maryland Congress of Parents and 
Teachers. Among other duties in this connection he planned and 
conducted a workshop for local P.T.A. health chairmen respon- 
sible for administering it. General acceptance of and satisfaction 
with the way the Association is meeting its responsibilities and 
functions were revealed. However, desirable changes that should 
be made became evident. For example, an overwhelming ma- 
jority of school people indicated the Association should, as soon as 
possible, organize district track and field meets to be held prior 
to the State meets. This was accomplished for the first time in 
1961 when seventeen district meets were held. Only boys who 
qualified in district meets participated in the two State meets, 
one for Class AA and A schools, another for Class B and C 
schools. The number of boys who participated in Association 
sponsored meets was, of course, greatly increased over other 
years. The entire 1961 expanded track program was conducted 
smoothly and successfully. Excellent cooperation was received 
from the counties and schools. 

For the first time in many years a clinic for football coaches 
was sponsored by the Assodation. Approximately 120 coaches 
and principals attended the two-day meetings. The coaching staff 
of the University of Maryland served as lecturers and consult- 
ants. A similar clinic is planned for next year. Forty-nine mem- 
ber schools sponsored football in the fall of 1960. 

Outdoor Education 

Washington County inaugurated an Outdoor School on a 
pilot basis in the spring of 1961. Close cooperation was received 
from the Frederick County Outdoor School. The few classes that 
were accommodated in the starting program used a camping 
facility. Camp Airy, procured by the Washington County Board 
of Education. 

Prince George's County employed a consultant. Dr. L. B. 
Sharp, to make recommendations on several tracts of land pres- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



ently owned, and others which might be acquired, for their po- 
tential use in outdoor education programs. 

Cecil County sent a pilot group to the Harford County Out- 
door School. Those counties which have outdoor schools, estab- 
lished for more than one year, are Frederick, Harford, and Cal- 
vert. 

The Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation as- 
sisted Mr. Andrew Mason and Dr. L. B. Sharp, consultant, in an 
evaluation study of the programs of the three forestry camps 
operated by the Maryland State Department of Welfare. 

Pupil Personnel and Parent Education Services 

During the 1960-61 school year programs of pupil services — 
guidance, health, psychological, pupil personnel, and school social 
work services — continued to grow steadily. This Department 
emphasized the development and coordination of these services 
as closely inter-related functions which are an integral part of 
the total instructional program. The Supervisor of Pupil Services 
and one of the Supervisors of Special Education worked in a 
cooperative and consultative relationship with the directors of 
pupil services and the supervisors of guidance, health, psycho- 
logical, pupil personnel, and school social work services in the 
local school systems to provide State-wide leadership in this area. 

Significant achievements during the year were : 

Coordination of Pupil Services 

Emphasis was given to provision for local supervisory lead- 
ership, coordination with community resources, appraisal of ex- 
isting services, and study of automatic data processing as related 
to school records. 

Six local units now have directors of pupil services with 
supervisors in the area of pupil services responsible to them. This 
pattern of organization is proving particularly effective in the 
large school systems. Planned programs of coordination with 
local administrative and teaching personnel are carried out. 
Other local units have made a definite effort to coordinate serv- 
ices by close cooperation of the supervisors responsible for these 
programs. 

State-wide committees were established to discuss the possi- 
bilities of using automatic data processing not only for pupil 
accounting records but also for the cumulative record and in- 
dividual pupil schedules. Many local units are experimenting 
with programs designed to make the keeping of records more 
effective and their use more meaningful. 

Guidance 

Emphasis was given to provision for local supervisory lead- 
ership, provision of additional counseling services for pupils, and 



54 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



evaluation of existing guidance programs. Ten full-time guidance 
supervisors in the local units assumed responsibilities during the 
past year. 

Psychological Services 

Emphasis was given to further definition of the function of 
the psychologist working in the local school system and to the 
development of an organized group of psychologists employed by 
local boards of education. 

There are 42 psychologists employed in the local school sys- 
tems. The psychologist is being used increasingly as a consultant 
and is working w^ith teachers in the prevention of problems as 
well as in diagnosis and individual evaluation. 

Pupil Personnel Services 

Emphasis was given to the coordination of pupil personnel 
services with those services offered by community agencies and 
to the implementation of the team concept within the local school 
system. Continued emphasis was given to preventive work with 
students through early identification and referral of those stu- 
dents who have problems of adjustment. Particular emphasis 
was given to work with the student who plans to drop out of 
school before the completion of the secondary school program. 

In each local school system definite programs were carried 
out involving school personnel and personnel from community 
agencies. In the small units where specialized personnel are not 
available through the school program, community resources were 
used extensively. 

Pupil personnel workers participated actively in the State- 
wide study of drop-outs. A joint project with the Employment 
Service was continued during this year in an attempt to follow-up 
students who drop out of school and help them with effective job 
placement. A State-wide committee is being organized to give 
particular attention to this problem. 

Parent Education 

There were many parent education groups in the State dur- 
ing the past year. Local units continue to assume responsibility 
for this program, with this Department providing consultant 
service as requested. 

Special Education 

Continued eft'orts have been directed toward development of 
new services and the improvement of existing programs for 
atypical children throughout the State. All local school systems 
now have at least one special class. Five classes have been or- 
ganized in local systems that previously had no special classes 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



and over 12,000 pupils received speech therapy. Services were 
increased for children with specific learning disorders such as 
aphasia, strephosymbolia, and perceptual dysfunctions. Work- 
shops, conferences, and committees continued to provide means 
by which programs can be improved. 

A workshop for teachers of educable and trainable retarded 
was organized. This workshop was held at Towson State Teach- 
ers College, June 19-23. Four outstanding specialists, nationally 
known in the field of special education, acted as consultants. One 
hundred sixty-three teachers, principals, and supervisors par- 
ticipated in the conference. 

A plan was worked out with the University of Maryland and 
Southern Regional Education Board to implement their contrac- 
tual arrangement to provide scholarships to George Peabody 
College for Maryland's teachers of the partially sighted and blind. 

Adult Education 

The Committee on Adult Education continued its study of 
adult education in Maryland. In addition to outside consultants, 
the Committee heard representatives from such groups and or- 
ganizations as the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers ; 
the Extension Service, the University of Maryland ; YMCA ; the 
Baltimore Muse^^m of Art ; The Enoch Pratt Free Library ; labor ; 
and the C & P Telephone Company. The Committee will present 
recommendations to the State Superintendent of Schools some- 
time during 1961-62. 

The availability of State funds for programs of nonvoca- 
tional adult education, though publicized at a late date, caused 
several local school systems to re-examine their offerings. No 
doubt, some additional nonvocational programs will be developed 
in 1961-62. 

A workshop for State Directors of Adult Education was held 
under the auspices of the U. S. Ofl^ice of Education in Washington 
in June, 1961. 

A project in liberal adult education was initiated in Calvert 
County. Participants included the local superintendent of schools, 
his entire supervisory staff, the local health doctor, and several 
community leaders. The project took the form of a seminar, with 
emphasis on reading, study, and discussion of basic questions 
relating to the nature of man. 

The Baltimore County Public Schools were awarded a grant 
of $4,000 from the Fund for Adult Education for the purpose of 
further developing their programs of liberal adult education and 
public responsibility. The grant was made for the year 1961-62 
on nomination of the State Superintendent of Schools to the Na- 
tional Association of Public School Adult Educators. As part of 
this program, Baltimore County has added another supervisor 
of adult education to its staff. 

Civil Defense has recently been introduced into programs of 



50 



Ninety-Fifth Annual RKroKT 



adult education. The question of Maryland's position on this 
matter should be discussed and, if considered feasible, a program 
should be developed. 

The relationship of adult education to the role of the aging 
population is being considered. It is especially important to con- 
sider what unique features this group of senior citizens presents 
in planning programs of adult education. 

Another area of concern is that of the mental health of 
adults. This area is likewise being explored. 

Institutional Programs 

The principal responsibilities of the Supervisor of Special 
Education for Institutions during the school year 1960-61 have 
been in providing technical advice, guidance, and supervision to 
the educational programs of various State institutions, especially 
the institutions for juvenile delinquents operated by the State 
Department of Public Welfare. 

Consultative visits were made at planned intervals to the 
Barrett School for Girls, Boys' Village, Maryland Training 
School for Boys, Maryland Children's Center, and Montrose 
School for Girls. Training school education was stressed with 
particular emphasis being given to curriculum development, ef- 
fective teaching techniques, in-service training, integration, and 
school budgets. 

The first annual preschool conference for all the training 
school teachers of Maryland was held on September 1, 1960, at 
the Maryland Training School. The general theme of the con- 
ference was 'Training School Education Moves Forward" and 
was concerned not only with the abilities and needs of delinquent 
children but also with the role of the teacher in the training 
school. The conference afforded training school teachers an op- 
portunity for hearing well-known speakers in training school 
work, for sharing school practices, for discussing problems of 
mutual interest, and for considering various ways in making 
their educational program more meaningful. 

An in-service training program for the purpose of promoting 
the professional growi:h of the teachers at the Barrett Training 
School for Girls w^as organized during the second semester. The 
weekly sessions gave attention to basic training school philosophy, 
objectives of Barrett School, needs of delinquent girls, human 
relationships, framework for the curriculum, lesson planning, 
demonstrations in teaching arithmetic, language arts, science, 
social studies, home economics, and cosmetology, different means 
of recognizing achievement, and the extension of present cur- 
riculum offerings. 

A one-day reading clinic was held for the school staff at 
Boys' Village. The theme of the clinic was ''Helping Training 
School Boys to Read and to Like Reading." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



Dr. L. B. Sharp, Professor of Outdoor Education at Southern 
Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, helped to survey the 
three boys forestry camps located in Western Maryland with re- 
spect to the over-all camp program. Dr. Sharp's findings, con- 
clusions, and recommendations were incorporated in a report 
and submitted to the Department of Welfare for deliberation and 
possible implementation. 

National Defense Education Act 

Science and Mathematics 

Two phases of Title III of the National Defense Education 
Act were in continuous operation throughout the year to 
strengthen science and mathematics instruction. One of these 
was concerned with supervisory and related services from the 
State Department of Education and the other was concerned with 
the administration of local acquisition programs for science and 
mathematics equipment, and minor remodeling. 

As a part of the first phase, twenty-three regional confer- 
ences were held in five areas of the State for science and mathe- 
matics teachers. The purpose of these sessions was to provide 
opportunities to discuss newest developments, content, and pro- 
cedures of instruction in science and mathematics. 

Assistance was provided local school systems in their 
continual appraisal and further development of science and 
mathematics programs in both elementary and secondary schools. 
Special attention is being given to planned, sequential science 
programs, in grades 1-12 ; in-service programs for teachers ; and 
consideration of the many new^ science and mathematics curricu- 
lum programs now under development. Pilot projects were de- 
veloped to organize, test, and develop new methods, techniques, 
and procedures for improving science and mathematics instruc- 
tion. 

Acquisitions under this program indicate considerable in- 
creases in laboratory facilities, and specialized equipment as 
integral parts of improved instructional programs in science and 
mathematics. A greater variety of learning experiences, as well 
as increased student participation in experimental procedures, 
becomes available through these acquisition programs. 

Modern Foreign Languages 

During the year 1960-61, continued efforts were made to 
implement N.D.E.A., Title III, in the area of modern foreign 
language instruction. These efforts were concerned with super- 
visory and related services of the State Department of Education 
as well as with the administration of local acquisition programs 
for modern foreign language equipment and minor remodeling. 

Conferences and workshops throughout the State provided 



58 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



opportunities to demonstrate and to discuss the newest develop- 
ments in materials and methods of instruction in modern foreign 
language. 

Assistance was provided local school systems in their con- 
tinuing evaluation and further development of foreign language 
programs. Special attention was given to planning sequential 
programs ; in-service programs for teachers ; and consideration of 
improved instructional materials. 

Experimental materials in French and Spanish were de- 
veloped and distributed to help teachers meet the new goals of 
language as communication. The audio-lingual concept became 
more widely accepted. More and more schools offered a minimum 
sequence of three years of the same language. 

Guidance and Counseling 

During this year, Title V-A funds were used primarily to 
provide additional counselors and clerical personnel in the local 
school systems. Additional counseling time was provided by em- 
ploying the counselors during the summer months. The employ- 
ment of clerical personnel freed the counselor from routine 
duties to devote more time to working with the students. Coun- 
selor-pupil ratio in the State continues to be well above the de- 
sired 300 to 1. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



division of vocational education 
Agriculture 

Practices and procedures in agricultural education have re- 
flected the unprecedented changes in agriculture and its related 
occupations. With the increased cost of machinery, farm 
mechanics instruction has increased tremendously in importance. 
Ornamental horticulture has assumed a new importance in the 
suburban counties and has possibilities of bringing vocational 
agriculture into an area and an occupation which is new. The 
steady increase in the number and per cent of part-time farmers 
necessitates a revamping of agriculture subject matter and sub- 
ject matter distribution. The high cost of farms and equipment 
has decreased the number of vocational agriculture graduates 
who actually buy farms, but it has increased considerably the 
number of father-son partnerships. There is a rapid increase in 
the in-service training of teachers in local workshops and also 
advanced college training. The general pattern of farming is 
changing rapidly in various sections of the State ; thus increased 
emphasis is being given on adapting the course of study to local 
needs. 

Membership in the Future Farmers of America and the New 
Farmers of America has changed very little in the past ten years. 
While there are fewer chapters now, consolidation has increased 
the size of many of these chapters. Activities in these organiza- 
tions are on three levels — local, state, and national. A wide 
variety of activities on all three levels has been made possible 
through most liberal aid and financing by several foundations and 
organizations. These activities are designed to aid boys to ever 
greater accomplishments. Splendid motivation is provided 
through a series of degrees through which a boy may advance 
according to his achievements. An over-all objective is the de- 
velopment of student leadership. Members are being given in- 
creased responsibilities for the directing and planning of their 
own activities. The culminating activities for the year's work in 
these organizations are the annual State Conventions held at the 
University of Maryland and Maryland State College respectively. 

Trade and Industrial Education 

Due to the rapid change in technology in trade and industry, 
special emphasis has been placed on such courses as electrical 
technology, industrial electronics, machine design, mechanical 
and aircraft technology, industrial electric tool design technology, 
mechanical technology, and laboratory technology. 

Part-time cooperative training programs have increased in 
number and variety of offerings to meet the ever changing needs 
in industry. 

A completely new venture in the trade and industrial educa- 



60 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



tion field was that of a pilot program for small business, con- 
ducted in Washington County. This was a cooperative program, 
sponsored by the Washington County Board of Education, Ha- 
gerstown Chamber of Commerce, Hagerstown Manufacturers' 
Bureau, Hagerstown Retailers' Bureau, in cooperation with the 
Small Business Administration. Eight consecutive weekly ses- 
sions of two hours each were conducted, with a representative of 
industry or business the keynote speaker at each. These pro- 
grams were taped and 16-mm. sound motion pictures were made 
available through the Vocational Division to those interested in 
developing a similar program. 

Educational Services to Industry 

A vocational interest survey of Maryland employers was 
made during the summer of 1960. Questionnaires were sent on 
a random sample basis to approximately 5,000 employers repre- 
senting the major business and industry groups in the State. 
Follow-up interviews were made with those employers who in- 
dicated that they employed technicians. This survey has provided 
information that will be used in planning vocational courses to 
meet the projected requirements of business and industry in 
Maryland. 

Vocational educators from Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and 
Virginia met with Maryland in a staff-improvement program at 
Hancock, Maryland, devoting one series of sessions to 'Improv- 
ing the Day-trade Program," and ''Supervisory Training Tech- 
nique of Job Instruction." 

In cooperation with the Maryland Society of Training Di- 
rectors, a management program was conducted for the Baltimore 
chapter of the American Society of Life Underwriters. A com- 
prehensive examination was administered by the College of Life 
Underwriters. 

In-service training programs for supervisors were developed 
and conducted for the A. L. Mathias Company, industrial food 
service managers, and the Church Home and Hospital. 

The annual spring meeting of the Maryland Vocational Asso- 
ciation was held at Aberdeen Proving Grounds in cooperation 
with the U.S. Army Ordnance School. More than two hundred 
industrial education teachers attended the concurrent teaching 
demonstrations centered on the latest teaching aids. 

The new Vocational Rehabilitation Center at Rosewood 
State Training School requested assistance in its teacher train- 
ing program for their trade teachers. These State employers are 
trade qualified but have no teaching experience requirement for 
the position. A basic program for developing skills in "job analy- 
sis" and "job instruction" was instituted. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



Home Economics Education 

As part of the continuous effort to have instructional pro- 
grams keep pace with the changing needs of individuals and 
families, special thought and attention were given to the follow- 
ing phases of the program : 

In the day-school program greater emphasis was given to the 
areas of housing and family relationships through in-service programs 
on both State and local levels. 

Increased attention in the teaching of foods and nutrition to 
understanding the basic principles in regard to health, economics, 
management, and the role food plays in family living rather than the 
preparation of a standard product. 

Increased attention in the teaching of clothing and textiles to 
achieving a balance between garment construction and other aspects 
of clothing construction. More time is being devoted to buymanship, 
wardrobe planning, care, management, aesthetic qualities, and the 
performance characteristic of textiles. 

The program of work in the homemakers clubs for students was 
built around the topics of family unity and family fitness, and the 
State project w^as devoted to developing a greater understanding of 
senior citizens. In carrying out the program of work the chapter 
members planned and conducted many worthwhile activities for senior 
citizens in their respective communities. 

A workshop in the area of Child Development and Family Rela- 
tionships w^as held for supervisors and teacher educators to define the 
competences that are needed by teachers for effective teaching in these 
two areas in the secondary school program. 



62 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

Changes in the pattern of lending services and in the per- 
sonnel of the Division of Library Extension characterized the 
activities of 1960-61. With the inauguration of the State-wide 
lending services of the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore 
through contract with the Department of Education, the special- 
ized information and resources of one of the country's greatest 
public libraries became available to all citizens of the State. Re- 
quests are made through local public libraries. The change placed 
heavier responsibility on local libraries to provide the ephemeral 
and general current material and the books for children, since 
these materials are not available through the Pratt Library con- 
tract services. 

The bulk of the book collection of the Division of Library 
Extension was dispersed to existing county public libraries to 
augment local book resources ; a smaller group of specialized 
books was given to the State Library in Annapolis, and the Mary- 
land material and general film collection were allocated to the 
Pratt Library for use in filling requests throughout the State. 
The professional library of educational materials for members of 
the Department and the curriculum materials center for use of 
educators throughout the State were separated from the original 
collection and organized into two library collections. 

Members of the Division staff participated in a number of 
professional assignments, conferences, and study groups, without 
as well as within the State. Miss Mae Graham, Supervisor of 
School Libraries, was a member of the special committee of the 
Study Commission of Chief State School Officers which developed 
the policy bulletin, Responsibilities of State Department of Edu- 
cation for School Library Services, published bv the Council of 
Chief State School Officers. 

The Division made arrangements for the collection, ''Books 
on Exhibit," containing some 800 new^ juvenile books to be 
scheduled throughout the counties of the State through the local 
boards of education. This collection provides an opportunity for 
librarians, teachers, parents, and the general public to see and 
examine current materials as an aid to selection and purchase. 
Lists of book and film acquisitions by the Pratt Library were 
distributed to local libraries as a part of the contract services. 

Public Libraries 

Public library activities within the State were centered on 
two primary goals : the establishment of new county libraries and 
the strengthening of existing libraries through cooperative ar- 
rangements among neighboring libraries. 

The first goal of complete State-wide library service came 
nearer to achievement this year when the boards of county com- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



missioners in Caroline, Dorchester, and Kent counties voted to 
provide sufficient funds to establish county public libraries under 
the provisions of the 1945 public libraries law. During the spring 
of 1961 these counties began the organization of county library 
service, leaving only Frederick and Somerset counties without 
such services. These new county libraries as well as others within 
the State are being strengthened at the outset by policy decisions 
to cooperate with neighboring counties in sharing special re- 
sources and services. 

The Allegany County Library came into being in July, 1960, 
coordinating the resources and services of the Cumberland, 
Frostburg, and La Vale public libraries and initiating county- 
wide bookmobile service in the spring of 1961. The Worcester 
County Library coordinated the services of the four existing pub- 
lic libraries in the countv and initiated bookmobile service in the 
fall of 1960. 

A significant development has been the cooperative activities 
that have been undertaken by neighboring county libraries in 
various parts of the State. These projects are demonstrating in 
Maryland what has been proved in other parts of the country — 
that libraries can plan and work together to improve the total 
library service — that better use can be made of funds, of staff 
with special abilities, and of books. The first of those projects 
began in Southern Maryland where the three library boards of 
Charles, St. Mary's, and Calvert counties agreed to try to solve 
some of their problems of staff through cooperation. They formed 
the Southern Maryland Regional Library Association, jointly 
employed a library administrator for the three counties, 
set up centralized cataloging and processing, and are developing 
together other services and resources. An executive committee 
composed of the presidents of the three boards decides on policies 
affecting the multicounty operation. Library policies for a single 
county are still determined by the local boards. Each county 
library is operated as an independent unit except for the activi- 
ties and services that the three agree should be performed by the 
Association and for which each county pays a certain amount 
into the joint fund. At present the regional association staff is 
composed of one chief library administrator, one part-time cata- 
loger, and two clerk-typists. A position of assistant library 
administrator has been authorized by the Association, and appli- 
cants are being interviewed for this new position. This coopera- 
tive arrangement has allowed this area of about 85,000 people to 
gain strength by sharing. Books move freely from one county 
to another, board members and staff members meet and confer 
on common problems, people are aware of libraries in Southern 
Maryland, both library use and local library appropriations have 
increased markedly. County commissioners are beginning to see 
the values of this cooperative arrangement, are no longer so 
afraid that one county's money may be spent to the advantage 



64 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



of another county. The people involved in this venture are con- 
vinced that it is v^orking successfully and that the further im- 
provement of library service in Southern Maryland will be ac- 
complished through the Association. 

Another significant project began less than a year ago on 
the Eastern Shore v^hen Wicomico and Worcester counties de- 
cided to make maximum joint use of the books transferred from 
the Division of Library Extension by setting up an area refer- 
ence center called the Lov^er Shore Area Library Center. This 
center has as its purpose the supplying of collections of books 
from the center to the libraries in the tv^o counties, the answering 
of reference questions referred to it by the two libraries, the 
preparation of exhibits and display materials, and eventually the 
ordering, cataloging, and processing of all books for the two 
counties. In January the new Dorchester County Library joined 
in the project. Plans have been made to set up centralized proces- 
sing for the three counties and to expand the plan and purchase 
the basic equipment that would make it possible for this center 
to perform the ordering, cataloging, and processing of books for 
all the counties on the Eastern Shore. If the other libraries on 
the Shore decide to take advantage of this possibility, it will be of 
great value in improving library services by freeing the profes- 
sional librarians from time-consuming, routine tasks that could 
be done elsewhere. At the present time the Lower Shore Center 
is located in the basement of the State Teachers College, Salis- 
bury ; has a staff of one cataloger, one full-time and one part-time 
clerk; and is operated through a contractual agreement among 
the three boards. 

Cooperative projects in other sections of the State have in- 
cluded in-service training sessions for staff, sharing of books and 
other materials, joint book lists and exhibits, and the sharing of 
experienced professional staff members. 

These cooperative projects have been financed partially 
through Federal Library Services Act funds. The LSA has been 
extended another five years, 1961-66. Within that period libraries 
can begin and firmly establish better services through new coop- 
erative patterns. Because of the need for growth through cooper- 
ation, a committee appointed by the State Superintendent of 
Schools recommended revision of old plan for the use of these 
funds. For the next five years the major portion of Federal LSA 
funds will be used for cooperative projects. Many libraries in 
Maryland will be able to attain standards of high quality service 
only through the cooperative arrangements that will make spe- 
cialized materials, staff, and services available on a regional 
basis. 

Conferences 

Conferences held this year were focused on needed staff 
training and on planning for further library development. 

In December the public library administrators met at the in- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



vitation of the Department of Education and decided to form an 
autonomous association known as the Maryland Association of 
Public Library Administrators. Miss Elizabeth Hage, Director, 
Prince George's County Memorial Library, was elected chairman. 
The group, with the cooperation of the Division of Library Ex- 
tension, held two one-day meetings — one to discuss the public 
library legislation and the other to discuss the lending services of 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library under the contract with the De- 
partment of Education and the changes in the use of Federal 
Library Services Act Funds. 

Two regional conferences on selection and use of reference 
books were held for staffs of local county libraries. About forty 
persons attended the sessions at Cumberland and Salisbury. Con- 
sultant for both conferences was Miss Mary Barton, former 
Head, Reference Department, Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

*Tublic Library Work with Children" was the theme of a 
one-day State-wide conference for all public library staffs. The 
program was prepared by a committee of librarians under the 
chairmanship of Miss Mae Graham of the Division of Library 
Extension. Principal speaker was Mrs. Ruth Hill Viguers, editor, 
Horn Book Magazine. About seventy persons from all over the 
State attended. 

A conference on *Tublic Library Development" for trustees 
and librarians on the Eastern Shore was held in June to bring 
new trustees and librarians together to discuss library services 
and cooperative plans. Miss Ruth Warncke, Assistant Professor 
of Library Science, Western Reserve University, was the con- 
sultant and speaker. About forty trustees and seven librarians 
from the 7 county libraries on the Eastern Shore attended. 

Other Highlights 

Mr. P. D. Brown, Trustee, Charles County Public Library, 
was awarded a national trustee citation by the American Library 
Association at its annual conference. The citation emphasizes his 
outstanding contribution to library development in Southern 
Maryland and the State and his efforts to secure improved legis- 
lation for public libraries. 

School Libraries 

National recognition of the school library as a part of in- 
struction and the concept of the school library as an integrated 
materials center provided both school administrators and li- 
brarians with the impetus and the direction they needed to make 
1960-61 the most successful year so far in the development of the 
school library program in the State. 

The Division of Library Extension sponsored two meetings 
for principals, supervisors, and librarians to discuss The School 
Library as an Instuctional Materials Center and one for school 
library supervisors and directors of instruction to discuss the 
same topic. 



66 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



The Supervisor of School Libraries worked with study com- 
mittees in Frederick, Howard, and Montgomery counties where 
they were making detailed, statistical studies of the status of 
their libraries and recommendations for improvement. She also 
worked with all the school librarians in Caroline County who are 
developing a manual of uniform organization for the schools in 
the county. 

The supervisors of public and school libraries made a joint 
survey of all school libraries in St. Mary's County, with recom- 
mendations to the Superintendent of Schools and to the County 
Library Board. 

Interest in elementary school libraries continues to grow, 
and a large percentage of the supervisor's time is spent with ele- 
mentary supervisors and principals throughout the State. Alle- 
gany, Anne Arundel, Carroll, Cecil, Charles, Dorchester, Garrett, 
Harford, Howard, Kent, Queen Anne's, St. Mary's, Talbot, and 
Worcester counties asked for assistance with these programs. 

Tangible evidences of growth : 

1. Increased appropriations for library materials 

2. Increased personnel 

a. Second librarians and/or clerical assistants in large schools 

b. Increased number of elementary school librarians 

c. Appointment of school library supervisors in Anne Arundel and 
Howard counties in June, 1961 

d. Organization of a Division of Instructional Materials in Mont- 
gomery County, v^ith increased staff 

3. Central processing and cataloging 

a. Central processing and cataloging for all libraries in Baltimore 
City and Montgomery County 

b. Central processing and cataloging for basic collections in the 
new schools of Baltimore and Frederick counties 

4. High morale 

a. Active membership of school librarians in the Maryland Library 
Association and the Association of School Librarians of 
Maryland 

b. Attendance of thirty Maryland school librarians at a five-day, 
non-credit course at Columbia University on the subject, "Audio- 
Visual Services and the School Library" 

c. Attendance by more than thirty school librarians at summer 
school at the University of Maryland or Western Maryland Col- 
lege where library science courses were offered. Attendance by 
at least ten others at graduate library schools out of the State 

These tangible evidences of growth seem to indicate trends 
for the future : 

1. The school library will be generally accepted as part of the school's 
instructional program and as an integrated materials center. 

2. The school library program will begin in the elementary school and 
extend through the senior high school. 

3. School systems will continue to look for cooperative methods of 
purchasing and processing library materials in order to decrease 
costs and increase efficiency in use. 

4. Local school library leadership at the school system level will con- 
tinue to increase. 

5. School librarians will have increased responsibility to assist teach- 
ers as well as pupils in knowledge and use of materials. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

This was another year of gradual but continuous develop- 
ment of vocational rehabilitation services to persons with dis- 
abling conditions heretofore thwarted in their endeavor to join 
the ranks with their neighbors in suitable and satisfactory em- 
ployment. The case load persisted in growth. Of a total of 5,925 
persons served, 1,491 were rehabilitated. Both of these groups 
were higher than last year when 5,743 persons were served and 
1,413 were rehabilitated. New cases advance to new totals year 
after year, with 3,834 being referred in 1961, an increase of 115 
over last year's number of 3,719. The new cases added to those 
carried over from the preceding year, amounting to 5,439, 
brought the total number in the case load up to 9,273. A greater 
awareness of the effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation serv- 
ices is constantly being promoted by the proof of more success- 
fully rehabilitated persons. 

The total cost of the vocational rehabilitation program in 
Maryland in 1961 was $1,049,520.26, of which $602,142.82 was 
Federal funds and $447,377.44 was State funds. The total ex- 
penditures amounted to less than $1,137,215.52, which would 
have been the cost to maintain the rehabilitants on welfare for 
one year, about one-third less than their annual earnings of 
$3,439,592. 

Perhaps the outstanding feature of the work in fiscal year 
1961 was the effort of the Division to expand and improve serv- 
ices in the five districts * of the State. 

Southern Maryland 

In Prince George's County the Division cooperated with the 
County Health Department and the local Society for Mentally 
Retarded Children in establishing a diagnostic clinic. Through 
the use of this facility clients of the Division, as well as other 
mentally retarded children, may have the benefit of thorough so- 
cial and vocational evaluation. 

The Division also cooperated with the Prince George's 
County Hospital in inaugurating a work evaluation program 
under which rehabilitation clients are given an opportunity to 
try out on various jobs in a hospital setting under close super- 
vision. This program has facilitated the satisfactory placement 
of a number of disabled persons. 

In Montgomery County, the Washington Sanatorium and 
Hospital opened a Prosthetic and Orthotic Clinic staffed by quali- 
field physiatrists, orthotists, physical therapists, occupational 
therapists, and a counselor of the Division who was given special 
training in this field. Through this clinic it is possible to provide 

* District Offices: Southern Maryland — Hyattsville; Western Mary- 
land — Hagerstown; Eastern Shore — Salisbury; Metropolitan Baltimore; 
Disability Determinations (OASI). 



68 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



the best in services to amputees and other orthopedically handi- 
capped clients without the necessity of their traveling to Balti- 
more. 

Through a grant from the Office of Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion, U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the 
Montgomery County Health Department, in cooperation with the 
Tuberculosis Association and the Heart Association, established 
a program for training occupational therapy aides to relieve the 
acute shortage of trained personnel in hospitals and nursing 
homes throughout the county. Division staff members partici- 
pated in the planning and organization of this program. 

Western Maryland 

In the western part of the State, the Division extended to 
Springfield State Hospital a more intensive program of vocational 
rehabilitation counseling by adding to the existing service 
another day and one-half of counselor time. This has resulted in 
making service available to all those in the convalescent area, as 
well as to those referred through social service. It has been pos- 
sible for counselors to see more disabled persons and to work out 
more rehabilitation plans for patients preparing to be discharged 
from that mental hospital. In addition, a typing class has been 
started, using existing equipment, and approximately forty pa- 
tients are being taught the rudiments of typing or being given 
intensive brush-up training. This program has proven to be 
successful, as it has resulted in vocational success in several 
cases, in addition to the immeasurable therapeutic effect on all 
students. 

During the year, the Division also extended vocational re- 
habilitation services to the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital and began 
working with those patients who are considered to be severely 
mentally ill to the extent of maximum security necessity. Among 
cases accepted by the Division, there have been good results in 
training and placement. 

Eastern Shore District 

In cooperation with the Governor's Committee to Promote 
Employment of the Handicapped and the Maryland State Divi- 
sion of Employment Security, there were conducted in two East- 
ern Shore counties this past year Job Clinics for handicapped 
workers. In Wicomico County, seventy-five employers from both 
large and small companies actively participated in interviewing, 
evaluating, and placing of the handicapped persons referred. In 
Cecil County, forty-five employers cooperated. 

In cooperation with the Maryland Workshop for the Blind 
and the local Lions Club, a small workshop was set up in Easton 
for blind workers whose potential is not good enough for indus- 
trial or outside employment. Making use of a visiting teacher 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



from the workshop, training was given to a small number of such 
blind workers from Talbot, Kent, Queen Anne's, and Dorchester 
counties. Instruction was in crafts, leather work, and chair 
caning, with the principal costs to the Division being trans- 
portation and supplies. The building, maintenance, and its equip- 
ment were donated by the Easton Lions Club. While this opera- 
tion is small in the number of trainees, it has served an unmet 
need, and it is expected that it will have further trainees next 
year. 

Two joint civic club dinners and programs in the observance 
of National Employ and Physically Handicapped Week were 
sponsored. In Elkton the sponsorship w^as by Kiwanis, Lions, and 
Rotary, with Mr. E. K. Foster, Vice-President and Group Exec- 
utive of Bendix Corporation, as the principal speaker. In Salis- 
bury, this affair was sponsored by the Rotary Club, with Mr. 
Chester Troy, Chairman of the Maryland Governor's Committee, 
giving the main address. Successfully rehabilitated workers at- 
tend both meetings as special guests. 

Metropolitan Baltimore District 

The Metropolitan District focused its major emphasis this 
year on directing staff efforts and professional skill to consolidate 
gains that had been made in areas already being served. 

In the area of the mentally handicapped, a counselor was 
assigned to the out-patient clinics of Crownsville and Springfield 
State hospitals, to insure continuity of the programs for clients 
which had been started during their hospitalization. Another 
counselor was assigned to w^ork at Rosewood State Training 
School to evaluate patients for the purpose of selecting those 
who could benefit from vocational rehabilitation services. Still 
another counselor, working at Spring Grove State Hospital, par- 
ticipated in a pilot study being conducted to rehabilitate nar- 
cotics. 

Cooperation with the Richmond Professional Institute in 
supervising rehabilitation counseling trainees was continued. 

One of the counselors who has worked closely with the Heart 
Evaluation Clinic in Baltimore served on a National Committee 
for Workshop Evaluation Clinics of the American Heart Asso- 
ciation. 

The orientation classes for medical students to the field of 
vocational rehabilitation w^as continued at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine and extended to the nursing stu- 
dents at Mercy, Bon Secours, St. Agnes, Sinai, and Union Mem- 
orial hospitals and to public health nurses. 

Additional counseling time assigned to Baltimore County 
permitted an extension of services to more people in that area. 



70 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Disability Determinations 

The Disability Determinations Unit of the Division proc- 
essed 17 per cent more cases in 1961 than during the previous 
year. This increase was brought about largely by amendments to 
the Social Security laws, which became effective during Sep- 
tember, 1960. At that time, the age requirements for eligibility 
to disability benefits were eliminated. The result was a substan- 
tial increase in applications from younger disabled persons. The 
history of legislation to date suggests that the Social Security 
Disability Program has not yet been stabilized from its con- 
servative beginning in 1954. 

During the year, the Unit assisted the Bureau of Old Age 
and Survivors Insurance in publicizing its disability program by 
contacting local medical societies and other medical groups. The 
purpose was to explain the implications of adjudication as related 
to medical evidence and the need for detailed medical reports. 
The film, ''Disability Decision," which was made available by the 
Bureau, was shown to medical societies, hospital staffs, and the 
staffs of State institutions. 

Miscellaneous Activities 

Each year larger numbers of severely disabled persons, in- 
cluding the mentally retarded, are referred to the Division. Since 
no adequate rehabilitation center facilities are available in Mary- 
land, continued use has been made of the Woodrow Wilson Re- 
habilitation Center of the Virginia Division of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation. At the Center, vocational evaluation, physical therapy, 
occupational therapy, work adjustment, and vocational training 
were obtained for mentally retarded, paraplegic, and other se- 
verely disabled clients of the Division. 

A study of the possibilities of establishing a sheltered work- 
shop in the upper counties of the Eastern Shore was initiated by 
the Chestertown local office. Participants have been health de- 
partments, boards of education, and county superintendents of 
schools from Caroline, Cecil, Kent, and Queen Anne's counties. 
The local welfare departments and Division of Employment Se- 
curity from these same counties participated, as well as repre- 
sentatives from the ministerial associations, the Veterans Admin- 
istration Hospital at Perry Point, and the Upper Eastern Shore 
Association for the Mentally Retarded, and heart associations. 
A Steering Committee of persons from each of these counties has 
subsequently met and is continuing its study on the desirability 
of establishing such a rehabilitation facility for the Upper East- 
ern Shore areas. 

A vocational rehabilitation counselor was employed by the 
Workmen's Compensation Commission to implement the legisla- 
tion passed in 1960, and a plan for improved referrals was put 
into effect with the Division's Metropolitan Baltimore office. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



"Comeback'' completed its ninth consecutive year as a sus- 
taining public service program on WMAR-TV, Channel 2. 

Rehabilitation Center at Rosewood 

The establishment of a Rehabilitation Center at the Rose- 
wood State Training School under the Department of Mental 
Hygiene provided an additional rehabilitation facility. Under a 
director of education, it provided a training program of job 
experiences in shoe repairing, food service, upholstery, sewing, 
and home mechanics to prepare patients for employment as part 
of the rehabilitation program in the hospital. A trained voca- 
tional rehabilitation counselor directed and supervised the hos- 
pital rehabilitation program, and a clinic team consisting of a 
psychologist, a social worker, an industrial therapist, a medical 
adviser, and a vocational rehabilitation counselor screened the 
patients into the program and made recommendations as to the 
types of work activities in which the patients participated. 

A counselor from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 
served on this clinic team and, in addition, acted as a consultant 
in recommending realistic practices and in establishing accept- 
able standards. Through close cooperative efforts with this newly- 
created facility in the field of mental disability, many more pa- 
tients can be rehabilitated into employment in the community. 



72 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 1 — Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools : Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


September 


June 




Schools 


September 


June 




Were Open 


1960 


1961 




Were Open 


1960 


1961 


Allegany 


180 


7 


13 


Harford 


180 


7 


16 


Anne Arundel 


180 


6 


16 




180 


8 


17 


BaltimoreCity 


180 


6 


15 


Kent 


180 


6 


15 


Baltimore .... 


180 


7 


16 










Calvert 


180 


6 


14 


Montgomery 


180 


6 


16 










Pr. George's. 


180 


6 


21 


Caroline 


180 


6 


12 


Queen Anne's 


181 


6 


13 


Carroll 


180 


6 


16 


St. Mary's. . . 


180 


7 


16 


Cecil 


180 


6 


16 


Somerset .... 


181 


6 


9 


Charles 


180 


7 


17 










Dorchester . . . 


180 


1 


9 


Talbot 


181 


6 


16 










Washington. . 


180 


7 


14 


Frederick .... 


180 


7 


16 


Wicomico . . . 


182 


6 


9 


Garrett 


180 


6 


9 


Worcester . . . 


180 


6 


9 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollment— Grades N-12, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: 
Public and Nonpublic: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


High 


ENROLLMENT 


Total 

Public* 

Nonpublic 


739,647 
607,580 
132,067 


467,910 
358,479 
109,431 


271,737 
249,101 
22,636 


TEACHING STAFF 


Total 


29,271 
24,663 
4,608 






Public* 

Nonpublic 


13,008 


11,655 








NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Total 

Public* 

Nonpublic 


11,434 
tl,031 
t403 


1,194 
827 
367 


365 
267 
98 



* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



eoeoeot-oooicjiaiaso 
cocococococococccc^ 



cocccccocococccococo 



oit-^t^ecNi-t^oot- 



00iO-*Tj'.-IO5eC0C^rj< 



05 05 CO o CO ic t- ec "ft 
oooot.-050rHe«:o5u5?o 



»HeOlftOO(MT)<r)<OOr-IOO 
t-?D(N'-H00OC000«5O 



00 05NOOr-llftO«5£lCO 

iocoift"5foo;Do>'*ift<o 
eceo-^ooooi-iioo-. eo«D 



05iftc-tr)«05-<*«et-»H 

(MCOC-^O^DOlftW-Ht- 

cg Tj<^ ift ift 05 »ft t> N 



coo.-t-ci'oooo^ecoot- 
^coo5O5O2ecc0(Mt-<o 
loeoooot-eooooocoo 



<Mooeoocoift(MTi<ioeo 
t- ^ 50 o ?o ^^00 1- -"t 
•S -rf CO oS 05 <■■£ t" o" CO 

00r-i-tt-0;(Ni0t-O(M 

CO >ftio in CO «o 



Ojoo5 05'*coo0'-it> 
■^■^c<ioio«<x>cDeoo3 

(N "ft 05 M 05^05 '^^■^ 

lo 05' so" i-T ic in ic t-" 00" 

tD05(MCOOeO!005(N»ft 

-t in m -sO X --o i;c t- t- 



(Neo'>*»ntot>ooo50^ 
10 ift 10 in in 10 in in 50 «o 

05050505050505050505 



NT)<cooinrHoo^oo 

!O^OOCO«5-<J<(NCOO 

»-^_ 00 co^ o in 1-H in 
t-* go" 00 05" o o" th n eo" 



ix>ino5 0050-^oooin»n 
05inTfr}<inoinc<i05in 
» (N «5 (N 00^ ?0__ f-H oo_ t> <y5_ 

» o CO* CO t- t-* 00* oT oT o* »H 



ineo^eoo-wcoooooir-i 
O500co-rj't-ooo5inr-<eo 

05__ in N in o_ « M in 
•rf t-" IN o* co" (N CO* r-T in oT 

CDCOt^XOOOiOlOOO 



^inooo:t-oo5c<io 
con'Oicot-mooeomN 
o_ t> <x oo_ io_ N in in 
CO* -^* ^ in* 05 o* Ti<* rr os* o* 
in t- o: o ^ CO >n in t- 
(NiMiMeoeceoeoeoeoeo 



cDoO'Hcoxcoot--^^ 
in(MinoinT}<t>05t>in 

in t> ^__t-__rM 05 O 05 

t-* oT T)<* CO* in N* o* in in* oT 
.-leccDoooN-^incot- 
eotocoeO'^'i'-'i'-'i'-^-'i" 



^t-O^Olt^COino: CO 

(Mt-comr-i-^-^coinco 
ccomcONNTfini-icD 



eooooocoNTj<t~co^o 
coeO'*'^ooo5-^oO'-i 
CO i-H CO in in CO n 05 
eo* (M* "H* CO* o" CO* to* o" ^* I ft* 
eoTfincoxoiOC^Ttin 



M'lnoot-^'-ieo^oco 

00-^t~O-. OTfo: C-CO-* 

yO_ oo_ 05__ t-__ CO 00 05 i-H eo__ in 
CO* in* -t* o* in eo* •^* o* ci" 00 
-^mcoooos'-M'^co^- 



MCO-^iftCOt-OOOSOrH 

iftininininminincoco 

05050505050505050505 



Ne0'*tncot-ooo50»-i 
ininininininmiftcoco 

05O^O5OS05 05O5O5O;O5 



WO 



74 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





Special 
Classes 1 




+- 








o 




<3i 




00 


ADB 


b- 


01 

O 


«5 




in 








05 




(M 








Kinder- 
garten* 


Grand 
Total 


Fall of 



Oi0MC<J00;000C<l«£>O 
O U5 Tf in N in lO 
oT 00 00 oT O O O N oT 



Ot-50(Mt-00t-O-^00 

u5t>t-cDooo5NU5oa3 
""l "-L ^ 



usiOMTj'Tj'oot-aiivftic 

lOlOOOajC-MtDiOi-IOS 



rH-^fCt-eccooo«ot-ec 
c^c-ecot-oooiOTji 

N 05 (M in (N 00 i> 

oT o ec o oT c<r «d" in ;d 



•«S<^Nin^(M-^^-HOO 

o>'^inooCTia>incoa5C- 

t> 00 lO O IN i-H e? 00_^ IN c-_^ 

ec in tD in oS t-' oT tjT 
05NiNC<Jeceocoe<3eO'<i< 



a>-*'-<ooa5iniNOi«oa> 
t-o^oint-inos-^cc 
t-^ c^i M co_ -^^^ ec CO «D 
«ooo o (N cd'oToo'cT tjTc^ 
c^iwc^coccccfC-^-^in 



'-<00Ti<C^3^rJ*^eC«O00 
t-OiHTl<t>O00lN<N(N 

■<*b-^Ti»_«eo^oo_^t>^-* oco 
^i-Tec t-'o oTo in eJ-* 
MWcoeotec-^Titinin 



ooooeooi-iint-c-ot- 
inoo3oo->s'Ot>t>iNi;o 
c^ooo^o-^mjiin^tD 



«oooinc^«?Dc:;cC'-ieo 
t-eO'-iinininoo-^'HTf 
NiNo;ooooooc-ooo 



tooooMOiOOTfcoint- 
ccCTiONinosininooo 



OOOOSCDt-OOt-OOt-X 

i#T}<Ti<eoe<3in^cDiMO 
t-^ Tf in in o CD ;d t- CO N 
as 00 o in eoi-To o coin 
CO CO ■<!< -"i* in m m in m in 



ooiNeoinoi«r>;r>in-<*oo 

O CO 00 t> N 00 to CD t> (N 

00 o in c<r o* — T CO in t-"" 
CO TP in lo i-o lo m in m 



OCOOino^-KN^rH 

oooeoooNt-cDcOrHt- 
inNooin'Dt-oo-<tc<i50 



-<j<c^-^cot-<Ncoeot>oo 
inincDoi^iNoinaio 
05_ ai_ CO ^ in eo_^ 

05 00 t-'oooo^o^i-TM eo" 



oooiNin-H=D^-^coa5 
inino^c-iNeoMeoaso 

05^ O (N X_ t> t> O 00 

O oT 00* 'H c-* (N in <-*' '-D 

c-o>(Ninxocoinooo 
05e0'^'*'^inininincD 



»-iMeo-<!i<incDt-oooso 
inininmmininmincD 

OS GS GS O 




NcoeoeocDcgcDoioocc 
comoinc^ic^t-eowoi 
o o C3 co__ t> N in co__ 

CD CO CD CO t-* in CD t-* 00* 



I CO CO tH i-H T-( - 



MOOCOO-^inc-t'-Ct:- 
inOCOOOrfOOt-INCO 

N o_oo^co -^in Oi^in cD^cD^ 

^ 05* CD* oT 00 oi 05*0*05 X* 

o5eococoo5co-^inT*Tt 



cDXinNcocDoieo^co 
c~eO'Hinininx-«t'--^ 

C^_^ <N 50_^ 0_ X_ W_ t-__ CXI '^^ 
CO* C-* O* X* O Tf* -H* o* oT o* 
CO CO 'S' CO "<f m in lo 



coxoNOiX-^eoint- 
eooiONinosminox 

i-iOOINOtJ'CO'-i-^O 



XOOlCOt-Xt^Xt-X 

•^t-^cocoin'-icoiNO 
t>-_^ in in o_ CD CD t> 05 IN 
oT 00 o ino5*'-ro'o co*in 
coco-<a<-*inininininin 



xcocomoicDcoinTtx 
oasascoxxTfcot-cD 
O 05^ X__ t> IN 00 eO_^ CD t-__ c<i_ 
00 o* in IN* — T o ^* CO in t-" 
co-^-^iomininininin 



ocooiinsji—i-HMfH,-! 
«oeox(>Jt>coo5'-tt- 
in N 00 in CO t-_^ 00 c^i cD_^ 
ocD*co*'-H*^ M in t-'oT— <* 

•'S'-^ininininininincD 



■^M-^COt-NCOCOt-X 

inincDOi^NOinoiO 
^ ^ ^ 

C0*00 t-*00 OOO t-r—TM* CO* 

rH^^^rHININOJlNIN 



iniN-^xcoinaiai'^x 
eoiNeoc-xx-Hinoio 

rH eO__ CD__ 05^ co_ CD_^ c^^ w t-_^ 

i-T o o* 05* in t-* ^* — T X t-* 
■^coxa;o^cOT}<Ti<in 
NNNNcoeoeoeoeoeo 



--HCico-^incDt-xoio 
inininininminminco 



coTj<oo-HOxa5CD'!)<o 
t-o»-n>coo50«ec^ 
oi '-<^in o> oi^x o N o CO 
NciciNNincorf lOr-T 



Ot-COlNt-Xt-O^X 

int-t>coxo5(Ninoix 

^OCD05CDi-iCDt-C0'-i 



ininwrt-^xt-csinin 

t~-ini-HCDMOCOOCOCD 

in in X 05 1- M CO in 1-1 oi 
in CD o* o> o* ■'f* X* -H* o* 



^-^C0t>C0C0XCOt-05 

(Nt-cooc-oooin-^ 
No>i-(05inc<ix-«a<t>a5 



rf-HMin-^M-^-^rHX 

asTfiincoaiOiineoaic- 
t> x_ in (N co^ x__ c<j_ t-_^ 
ec in CD oT rH* in 00 t>ar-«t 

WINNINCOCOCOeOCO-^ 



x-*^t-T}<(Neo^ineo 
coa5t>cD-HiNXCD.-H^ 
i~ o_ T-4_ eo__ co^ co^ 05__ CO co__ 
CO x*o*iN*cD arx*o*->^ oi" 
NC^cococococo'^'1'in 



a505CD.H050-*NaiT)< 
cDxa505X05incoo5a5 

COOt-i-l»-ICOCD0505C<I 



05XXt>X-^<NiniN— I 

iNiNinoicomot-oo 
00 CD in t> CD in tt 00 

!7rx*t-*-H'incjro' '^NoT 

NCO'tJ'COt-XO.-ICO'^ 
^rHl-lrHiHi-HNNCgCJ 



i-ic^Jco-^incDt-xoso 
inmininininmininco 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



CO ;c M cc CO 
eg o 00 N 
(X o N <M,ec 

1-1 Tj< C- X 



t> ec ^ i« 
Tj< c- M .-t o 

00^03 t> 00^^^ 
U5 oT «D ^'rjT 
rHCO«5 00 



o rt c 

t~- t~ X — I » 

LO O 



ec 31 3; X c<i 
c- X t- o o 



3: — ' — irt m O m O -.O 
3;C-irtXCC Xt--<-*3; 

^ X 



00 t-_^x_^3i^cg_ ;d^(N cD^t> c<i^ 
CO in S CO k-o CO lO 

i-H t- CO 



-.O JO c X 

CO CO — o 
— I X eo lo 



CO c~ t> 
.1 in 1-1 CD 
»-<__in a;^eo__ 
Tf x'aTin 



Oi m N eo X 
« X Tj< o 
ooeo io-^^a5_ 
in CO eo t-'eo" 

rH CO CO t- 



M O O 31 

in x> c^) t iM 
N o_t- X 3;^ 

o^x'^o'in co"-<*"-^''co"co' 



X — < in o CO t- eo X in 
cTicot-iniN cot-caaseo 

■<tt-3>_inN 0^0_in^3(N 

x'^-Teo'in -rt 

CO CO 



31 -tf in 
CO o 
o CO in CO 



in N eo eo 
t- (N eo ^ o 

t- 31 C- 31 t- 



in in o t- Tjt 

t- eg Tf T)< 

o_x__co__co__i> 
3rx''co*in 



<N^c<ia:3i x—ieoOTt 

oit-eox3i eoinoinin 
T-^co__in -H o_ 

eo-rf-rft^co eo'c-'eo'in"-^' 



CO N eg t- 

co Tf eg o 
3ieg'-i'-H 



35 CO CO CO eo 
in 31 oi — < X 
X in 31 o in 



X X -< O 
eg CO o 
o_in co_^rr co_^ 



t- eg m 31 eg t> ig o m 

coeoc-t-co xm-t^t- 
c-__co 35_t-__0^ 

cg'-^eo'in co' t> eo'eo'in 



eg 31 c 

X X t- 

X int- 3-. 



31 X CO m 



co-^egeoeo 3icoinco3; 

coTf3iin-j cocoeocgo 

eo__co^cg__in eo^o^co^ino^ 

oS^n^cn c^'o'eo*-'!"'"-* 

i-H i-H in in 



m — 1 X o 

CO CO 3: 31 

x__o^eo__oo 
eo't-'x*"* 



m X X X o 

-H X CD 

-^t CD in eo 



eo 31 1~ CD m 



cg3i — mx -^xt-joco 

3icoincgeo xxeg^ro 

3i^-.o_^in co_^3i^ ino^cg_^cgo^ 

eg" in eg t-'co'eo'^f 



eo 31 1- t~ 
eg 31 o 

31 T)< 31 t- 



cg t> CO -"t 
31 ooeocgt- 
eg X in o •<a< 



1 1—1 W »iW "^T ^ ^ 1^ liJ 

coinincoeo t-oocoeg mot-ego in3it-o 

1 x_^t> <-<^c-^eg^ >n in 3i^o_^x_^ 

r eo'x't-'in m" ^"i^""'""'"^'" eo'in c-'Tr 



— I Tj" eo 
X c- m CD eo 
CO o X o 



oegeocoo 3icorj<r»-t -leoeoox cg^coeo 

X — < in eg cd x 3i — i m eg 31 co m eo m 31 co 

t>co_t>ino_^ o_^-*^int>t> "^.l^v"^.^. ^.1*.". 

co*'x''-,c'"in in -HTd"'"o'"-^'"eg t-'oc cg'eo'co' eo'm" co'tt 



X— <-Ht-uo xin35eoo t>-^->3<cot- eoM3ixeo t-T)<eO'* 

cgin3iX35 ineomxai megm-^o 3icDinx3i "cft-t-o 

o eo__t-_^x_^ co^3i_eg eg_^x_^ in co^^co^in co__ oox__ot- in-<tincg 

in o-eg-eo'cg" eo't-'co-in o-f' 31 eg" nincSnn co*'^"co"tf" 



.-go 

_ QJ 

zs G a a cs 



0; C O CIS 

?: ca cs o & 



5 o c 



sis 



eg o 35 X eg in 
eg in in eo 35 31 
eg oiiO 



CO o eg -1 vn in X 
1-1 in in CO eg o X 
X 31 in 



■ 3; t- 31 31 X 
•eoeocoxinco 
in eg m 



,103 


•t-t- 

•,Hcg 


,099 
5G0 


eg 


eo* 




eg 
eg 
eo__ 


• ©am 


• 10 • 

•T-l ■ 


•COTt 


eo \o 


0" 
eg 


eo" 


co" 




•X31 

■eo eo 
x_^ 


oeo • 
• CO • 

CD__TJ< 


31_ 


x" 


eg" 


in 



01 


• eg t- 

• CO 


■t-t- 

,-iCO 




in 


eg^eo 


x" 


eg* 


in 



■eo t- 
egcg 
o 



c« 15 ^^^^ 



76 



it 



1 

n 



II 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

I mm ^iSiS iiSsl ipig ipS 



I iiip sills iiiis ipia Siii 



I iiip iiisi iiisi mm 



I iisii igiii |p=s ipg 



I IIIP ipift |i§sS ipsi 



I IIIP issii |i|r.i ||SSi ipi 



|||| SHI iilli ipil Bill 



I liiii illii liil 



I iSisS |s|li lliiii 2ig| 



I liiis liiii ipi; %im 



I ll|p illii piii liei .|j I 



I slif pps m 



% liiis mm i§§i 



I -II 



11 



I Sill- SggS ; R ;SS : IgsS' 



1 liil Hill ip iiii lisi 



1 




I i||is SiiiJ isiB isp m 



li M !ii li ii 



i 





m 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 





^2 


1 giiiS iiSii igiig asSi 


School Pupils in Gbadb 




S slii- ^"'^^ IP"^ 


o 


1 iiSli iillg i§si 




1 piii ipis iiii 




oo 


1 liiiS §i|sS ipii ipi 


i 




1 isiis Ppl igil 




II 


«?s?srt f:!gg^^ oSo5- Sg-S^^; JSggg 

1 Pilp =-Sg% |lg|' p|"s!- SSpl 
* 

£ : : : : : : : : : : :2 : : : : : : : : : : : : 












S : : : : : : : : : : :2 : : : : : :2 : : : : : 










CO 


1 iPSi sign Ipsi iiiS 


a 

M 




1 §i,i|i iifii ppi ipis ipi 




1 liiss P|ii ipis iip 


1 




1 HIP fiisg ipi 


i 




i giip Sills iSiSs iiiii mm 


! 


_ 


1 HIP is.ps p§ii spj 




It 


23,308 

... 

14.247 
55 

59 

8,238 

592 
95 




f 










u 






Total 
Ele- 
mentary 


1 ii|i5 IIIII iiii ipii mi 


Grand 
Total 


f Hill pil ipii IIP 


1 
1 


Anne Arundel 

Baltimore City... 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Harford 

Howard 

-Montgomery 

I'rince George's. . 

Queen Anne'.s 

St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 

W.asliingtoii 

Wicomico 

Worcester 













lyi o 






































mi 






mi 


-2 



78 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



»f5CO ■ y-l 



-0-2 
.S S 



OH 



^ lO (M 



o 


CO 
05 

°l 
TP 


— 00 (M — «5 
CO 05 O 


■ (N CO 05 ■ 
• CO >o • 


• • • 05 0> CO <M • 
OS • • CO • -—00 o • 

• • CO (M ■ 


— CO • • 

(M 05 ■ • 


o> 


OO 


167 
198 
2,028 
1,647 
10 


■ CO S » • 


?Q ■ • ^ ■ OO 2 li? • 
— ■ • ■ 00 IM • 


— — >o ■ 

!M <M <M • 


00 


•«tl 

05 
OO 


• CO — • 
■ CO ■ 
CO • 


• -00 • • 

• • M • ■ 


00 CO (M • 

M •<»< — <>» • 


• 00 • • 




(M 

CO 


■ — coo ■ 

• CO OiO • 

N • 


o • • 


(M c; 1^ — • 





CO CO t— I 



■ — o o 

• O 

• 1-H <M (M 



CO • • »-< 



— (M — l« 



t^<M>«t^ • C<) CO -00 

CO '— I 05 CO • -^03 -OS 



CO • T-1 



,05 05 1-- • 



COt^OS-^ • rfOidCO 
»0 — — • CO 05 CO 

y-i . »0 CO 



M 05 t~ • 
lO O CO • 



00 CO Tti ■ 
Ir^ 05 CO 00 C 
0< lO CO CO 



— ' — I (N CO 



05 o t~ 00 »o 



(M CO o 

— 05 -"f 



COM<OOCD • 05t-< — l>. 
IM >0 O • O 05 C<> 
(M T-i <M • C0_0 »0 



• a> 03 K5 

. CO — Tt< 



• O • — c 



) ^ ^ CO 
' CO — 

< 00 -H — — < 



000«50 



coco — OcO CO <M CO O; CO 

OC0051-H— iOf— 'lo 

Co" «0 Co" 05 ' — 



I — — -^f CO 05 — <M 



3 oj 

•±i o o ^ 

^11 1 



S S 3 OS 



gill 



13 P 



0<N g 



2 §'3 

» c £ 

3 .. a 

feb'S o 



Maryland State Department of Education 



^1 



S >3<oooo -i-i.to - o--c^ - ot^-o - — ec- 
us rtrt^OS ... ... lf5<M • . 

eo 

00 •^^t^-^xn • C>J ii5 O • • • '-' • 05 ?D • oo • • 

lO r- • cc — • oo • -co • oc ■ - • 

05 — — . (>J O, . . . lO CO • — - 

CO — *— r 

CO c<i o -o -o • o • -o • eo CO • • — 1 CO «o 

O >0 1-- — < CO -00 • — • -co ■ oo t--. • C<1 ■ <N C^l 

c>3 ^»-eoeo • • y-^ ■ • • «o«o-c^- 

>0 O O (M O • — ifS 32 • O • • l>. • OO • • O CO «? 

1^ (MOCOC5CS1 • O — ■<»< • <M ■ ■■— ■ OO • 0> ■ CO O C<> 

lO O 00 O (M • CO • • • OO -SO ■ CM 



t>. 05 ^ «D itl 
IC O CO OO O ^ 



00 t-005lCO -CC-^iC • t^OIMOO • COCi -OS • OOOOO • 

M U500O5C— • -"ti CO ■ CM OO ^ ■ -^00 -t^ . (MOOCOl • 

OCMCOOC2 ^ . -ec • 

05 co" --^ 



— CO o o to 
O— iO»0-H 
CO Tfl »o O 



CO 00 CO • 



.2 i J 



i-H O O OS «0 05 

— ^ oo •>*< O 

oo CM f «o CM 
O" Co' CM* 



O oo — O •<1< ■i*< 
O ^ O CO CM 

CO CM »C 05 T»< 



CO iC >o ■>4" 



CO 00 CM O lO 



: — CO • to C^J 

— CM • CM — X.' 



•OCM- 

■ CO ; 

■ CM 00 . 



CO ■ t- CM 



C5CM CM CO 
lO oc 

CO O CO lO — 





eo 

00 


2,979 
4,572 
37.479 
23,636 
163 


OCOCOO • 
CO C5 — 00 ■ 
•«»< 00 >o • 


1,651 
108 

1.335 


5.318 
.4.099 


• e<i • 

• 00 - 


Oittiiii ■ 
— 00 CO • 
CO C: CO • 


z ■< 


o 


• C3 • 

co" 

















— ■ 

5 « a> 

c a ll — 



s- =32i: £ iz z ^ i: J' c; H » 

^ ^ _?3 _c. ^ ^ ,^ ,5 _i .S 



I 2 5-° 

M cj — £ 



X X — ^ 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 







UDE 




o 
g 






M 

D 


o 


PL, 




o 




o 

K 




ryj 




e 

c 




W 

b 
O 


OO 


BJ 




MBI 










Total 
High 



1,046 


• QC OS l« • 

• Tt> — CO • 


• ■ cc • 




. . t- • • m ■ 




1,043 


•CO U50 • 


• • OO • 

• • cc • 


. o • • 


• • O ec to ■ 





■ Tf< (M >rt • • -OS • • ^ . . . . (M CD t>. CC 

• ic ro • • • <M • • — . . . . o 'J" 

CO CO 

•cot^--; ■ ■ -00 ooeoco — 

■CC^Cr. • --C^ (M'^ — (M 

CO<M ^ 

• — coo • • (M 05 — < 

■ CO 05 C • • • CO CO 

coco . ^ 



SIS 



-H •-H OiO 

CO • o — o 

O • OO 0> OS 



• CO CO 



t- — • CO • CO •<»< • 



■ cr. CO • o -"f o 



. O CO CO • 



OC CO — 
C: CO 
IC CO 



CO 05 o ac 

00 — ic — 

CO CO 



oc o 
CO cc 



i O; M iC 



CO O CO C5 
oc CiCO CO 



CO CO o 



3 £ £^ ■ 

S S S 
-S > o 



_ ® — To 

^ s ^ ^ C t4 *o 
=2 C c4 e« J3 eS 3 « ^ - 



<U O C3 



9 c 



iir.i 



I" 



"c o 
o CO 



m a 



CO cs 



03 C 

•§ <5 

3 .. 

1 

bC bfl 

B B 

^ :§ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



-2 c 

m O 



Other 
Physically 
Handicappod 


-Tf LO I- ^ a-. 00 

^ (N .-1 C<1 
-j; t- t- X t- 


Brain 
Damage 


x> Oi er. ^ 
in N 1-1 lO ;d 


Epileptic 


03 O «i 00 05 5£> 

cc N ec « cc 


Visually 
Handicapped 


c; c- c- ^ 
o J5 — < o 00 


Communi- 
cative 
Disorders 


O O «D ^ 00 
^ 00 i» 00 


Ortho- 
pedically 
Handicapped 


sr. X t- to M 

5; — 1 (M c^j 
X X X X 3i 


Mentally 
Retarded 


i.-t Oic t- ^ ^ 
O <X> X X (N 

sc co_ Ti<^ in 
ift S t-* x" — '* 


Grand 
Total 


(N 00 « a: cc 

t- O » t- CO lO 
to t^x'sT-H 05* 



u 

a; J 



!£i t- « OS O ^ 

ifs lO m lO ;o ?D 
mot- 

m m u5 m lo o 
o; a> o> OS a> 05 



'■^OSX-^ t-vOOC 



U3 O C- m -X t:- Ot X iC IM 



X 

-I X 



00 -ff OS r-j eg 

0? ^ 



» OS o: c '.a 
t- oi X in 

(N 00 35IM 



ir; eg c- X o^ 
(M o o: 

^ ^3 <N 



Xi^moix --cgoo: 

^ T IN -1 



;d t>(N o: 

in X rl< 3; ^ 

Nox m 



X t- «D ;d Tf 
^ or eg 



m in ce c- 
t- c eg t- — I 
a: X 



•go . 

g 0) a, 




S cs 



SI 



■si 

•S3 



M a) 

11 

Si 



2 a 
ceo 



82 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



rH ?D N IJtl 05 

05 (M o CO Ti< 

N l> --H l> (N 

i-Tco to 05 oToo 
o lO Tj< (M Tj< eo 

lO uti VO lO 00 



oooo 

05 05 
(M ifSOt- 



OOOOO O^OOO • OOO 

OOlOOO IOC<10-* • OOO 

N t- "^.'^.^ "-L ' '^.^ 

T-T (NIN OON CO ' m 
Cr- CO 



(N 00 M eC 05 00 

o t- 05 eo 05 

05 tH rH O 1-1 Irt 



.-140 m t- 1- o 

rf f O <N CO 
t> O N 00 CD 

CD t-''o''T-ro5 

00 CO 00 1-1 O CO 



OOrtTflCOi 
00 05 05t> IN 
50_(N»H t> N 

CO i-H o oTi-T 

C<lt-CC 



05 05 eo 
O5 05 coeci-i 

00 IC lO r)< 1-1 



t>Ot-OCD 
(M03O5Tf<C- 
rH i-<_O0 NCD^ 

co'cqNcicJ 



in-<tt-cDO N050505 

•^UJC^OrJ" 00 O O in 

00 us i-T r-T CO'i-TrH 



t- O r-l 05 IM 

03 05 CO i-( 1-1 00 
C<1 (N 05 03 IC in 



^OOO-^iHOS O5m'1'IN00 ^mi-(0005 

0510C-CO CC^Oi rH t- rH 

1-1 Tt< IM 



O t- lO N t- 05 
05003^1-1 1- 

c^-^t co^oo CO 

r-ro5co''o''i-r(M'' 

in (M 05 00 tr- 
io t- t- t- U5 



oo-*T)<ioa; — <O5i*o:03 t-oc-ocr> t--o3oooi M'-^iNt- 

00O500COC<l O5O5CSie0i-i (NOO-^rfC- OCOt-OO IN03O5O5 
00t-C<JiON i-liO— iTfi-i t-OJ-^COO 00103^-^ OCOCCift 



CO 03 03 lO 



05 00 03 C<J 1-1 fM 
05 05 03 1-1 lO 00 

1-H 03_lO -* CO rH_ 



00U3OC005 (MiOiONOO <N t> i 
03 lO 03 <0 i-( 03 1-1 IM i-H I 

iH t- 03 



^5 



-< < 



3 0, 



(-. U 

03 (D O c4 • 



S o c 



l8| 



Maryland 



State Department of Education 



83 



5 o 



§1 



o a 



O C3 



O C3 



M «0 »rt M (M rc 
CI cc "-^D 



I CO 



00 00 OO 00 O 50 



eC OO C5 C<3 00 o 
— CO »c t— 

^ ^ ^ 



^ CO 00 o 

^ — ^ — c>) 



CO CO ro IM <M CO 



" Oi O >0 C5 t-~ 



I uO CO O) 



00 50 M iC CO 



' >o CO o; 



O C<1 — . » ^v) 
O CO 03 CO OS 
CIC^ (M CO CO >f5 



00 lO "5 O «0 



O t-- 30 0> O — < 
up >« C5 «C O O 

>.-; li ofa Ci o 
g !5 !£? 5£? ^ 2 



CO t- • — 



CO • — — . 



OC ^ — > CO 



iC 00 CO OC 



C<1 C5 o oc 



— — ifS CO 



r-> <0 IC O 



CO <M U5 e>i • 



00(MMCC'^ TfOCOCO' 



III 



' CO iC ^ < 



. ca 



22 



.2 

J = § 



_3_3 .. 



84 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



a 
a 

u 

3 



a"* 





a 



Epileptic 


(N 00 00 «D >0 


Disturbed 
Emotion- 
ally 


t- «0 C£) Oi t- 


a 

a. 
Pi 


Other 
Physical 
Defect 


O t- T)< t- O N 
(M O 00 t- rH ec 
CO CO CC CO 


■a: 
o 
S 

<: 
W 
>- 


Rheumatic 
Fever 


05 00 00 CO «0 
CD CD 00 t> 00 
N CO (M CO CO (N 


R Physical 


Plastic 
Condition 


t> 00 CD CO 05 00 

r-ICOCOCOlOrH 


K 

o 


Congenital 
Heart 


CO o >ra CD t- 1- 

r-( CO CO CO CO CO 


FED 


Other 
Orthopedic 
Defect 


00 ■<* 00 CO CD 
00 CD 05 CD lO 

CO CO CO CO CO 


Y Handicap 


Post-polio- 
myelitis 


CD CO iC O: t- 

r-i CD c- in lo lo 


EDICALL 


ngenital 
formity 


ot-ooaiQO«o 
T}< CO in 


HOP 


O Oi 




Ort 


Cerebral 
Palsy 


CD 00 O t- Tf 

CO CD -<t m Ti* 


Mentally 
Retarded 


OCD 05 05 CO CD 

cq CO CO i-H eo 05 


Total 


t- O -H 05 CO 
CO 05 CD »-l ^ 00 

cocoeoeomin 


Year and 
Local Unit 


1955- 56 

1956- 57 

1957- 58 

1958- 59 

1959- 60 

1960- 61 



coo5r-(eoco eococDin 



Ti<^cO'*eo coTfco^co 



ica Niocoi 



(O5T1-C0 rHO^inr-^ 



CO 05 



.Id -T-i ■ T-(r-l 



I ,-1 ■ CO • CO . 



• ■ CO 1 



cdcoti<^05 O5in->*cox r-iin^ooco 
comt-cD cotmco 



^ooco coint-oco oocoifti 

t-l-Hl-l COOO tH Ttr-I 



o o 

e s 



01 CiiiJz. 



o o as 
cs a o o 



<;<;cQWU ououQ feOWWW SpuiCww hit>pi> 



1>> M- 



Hi 



Maryland State Department of Education 



sically 
icapped 


N 00 eo ^ 

Tl< 10 to 






leptic 


CO ,-1 


Epi 




Hearing and 

Speech 
Handicapped 


tH eg ^ ec oc 




IS. 






rH ^ -H CO 10 !-( 


11 








sturbed 
tionally* 


Ol CC (M '^O «D 


Q £ 
W 




Cerebral 
Palsied 


eo irsfN » 10 00 

(N <M CC CO Tt" 




a; >.'5 ^ 00 

>f5N00t-^CO 

(N cc cc eo 




Ment 
Retai 



K -3 

< < 



<r> o t> 00 ec 00 
oi t- N t- ai 

IM CO 10 iO 



O t> 00 Oi o, 
in 10 < 

J5iX>t>-06< 

10 in 10 u5 »n o 

iji ^ ^ (Ji ^ 



iHi-ioec 



ino 



S c ea c< 







£ O C 



4/ 0) o rt 



60< t^t 

a Ps O'er- C/2 



c 

Illi 



86 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



(M e<5 O CO 

03 05 CO 
<M ^ (M CO 



^ O ■«*< CO e<j 

CO C<l »0 ifS 
<N <M <M CO >C 



• CO oo o> 

• lO ■«»< !>• OO 



CO Oi iM O O lO 
m lO O to O CO 
Oi »C O Oi 

»oco t -Toc o'o; 



O O ■»*< C 



ITS lij ITS IC O O 
U? O t>. OO OS o 

c; «i o C5 <35 C-. 



CO ■ — >o 



O CO lO • 



— CO 



O -H lo 

OCO--H— . 

■rt |>. Tj< to 



o o o o 

<M »0 CO 



CO ■ o — 



^ C c3 ^ ^ 



OOOOQ fcCKK^ So.O'MJW 



l-ili 

^^^^ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



U 

2 

• IN 



hi 





£ « S 



O ^ 



§D5 



£ «« S 



o o 



c «« 



§1 

S5 J 
< < 



05 05 Tjl 

00 lot- 



Li M O 
CO lO 



o ooo 

(N t- 
too" 



o o 
o o 

C£> 



t-ec 



t-«oo 
ooot> 



oo 
oo 



O 00 o 
O O 
M 00 05 



§ a> 0) 
^E£ 



= c 

<< 



w w w 03 U »^ ^ 

CQCQU UOUOQ 



J T) -0 

COO 

£ cs rt b 3 



^ c 



§11^ £ Ills 



1^ 



O O 



88 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



PABLE 18— Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools for Atypical Children 
and Institutions: Fall of 1960 



Name and Location 


Number of Pupils 


Total 
Number 
of 

Different 
Teachers 


Nursery 
School 


Kinder- 
garten 


Ele- 
mentary 


High 


Special 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen 














Burnie 






88 


3 




7 


Benedictine School for Excep- 














tional Children, Ridgely 










30 


5 


Boy's Village of Maryland, Inc. . . 
('erebral Palsy Nursery Treat- 






210 


24 




13 














ment Center, Silver Spring . . . 


7 


5 


7 






6 


Children's Rehabilitation Insti- 




















55 






10 


Children's Rehabilitation Insti- 














tute, Out-Patient Dept 


18 


11 








9 


Friendly School, Baltimore 






25 






3 


Houses of Good Shepherd (2), 














Baltimore 






79 






14 


Linwood Children's Farm, EUi- 














cott City 










20 


9 


Marc Nursery School, Bethesda . 


is 










4 


Maryland School for Blind, Bal- 














timore 




34 


157 


62 




39 


Maryland School for the Deaf, 














Frederick 


16 


20 


90 


42 




27 


Maryland Training School for 












24 


Boys, Loch Raven 






265 


76 




Montrose School for Girls, Reis- 




















73 


62 




16 


Rosewood State Training School, 














Owings Mills 


32 


55 


152 






17 


St. Francis' School for Special 
























85 


10 


St. Maurice School, Bethesda . . . 










61 


5 


St. Vincent's Infant Home, Bal- 
















17 


10 








3 


School of the Chimes, Baltimore. 






ii 






11 


Searchlight Training Centers (3), 














Baltimore 


11 


11 


46 






14 



^Figures furnished by principals of schools. 

Note: These enrollments are also shown in TABLES IV and V. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 19— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1951-1960 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



Local Unit 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 




61,081 


63,165 


64,523 


67,445 


69, 205 


1 no 

72,108 


76,127 


75,997 


77,16o 


77,496 


Allegany 


1,824 


1,785 


1,729 


1,577 


1,586 


1,583 


1,664 


1.634 


1,667 


1,690 


Anne Arundel . . . 


2,969 


3.132 


3,444 


3,811 


3,840 


4,036 


4,574 


4,762 


5,058 


5,185 


Baltimore City. . 


22,630 


22,775 


22,748 


23,523 


23,291 


23,782 


25,067 


24,464 


23,893 


23,262 


Baltimore 


7,489 


7,937 


8,547 


9,057 


9,699 


10,701 


11,740 


11,759 


11,993 


12,047 


Calvert 


405 


427 


432 


431 


471 


413 


473 


421 


457 


458 


Caroline 


396 


432 


431 


405 


423 


460 


393 


465 


435 


436 


Carroll 


818 


1,019 


888 


921 


984 


995 


1,079 


1,095 


1,110 


1,095 


Cecil 


801 


901 


958 


1,054 


1,163 


1,261 


1,437 


1,252 


1,281 


1,287 


Charles 


782 


684 


825 


877 


937 


891 


986 


987 


975 


1,023 




630 


585 


597 


632 


588 


616 


625 


616 


560 


547 


Frederick 


1,464 


1,438 


1,430 


1,519 


1,533 


1,597 


1,607 


1,577 


1,602 


1,662 




508 


497 


467 


448 


448 


470 


420 


470 


444 


449 


Harford 


1,645 


1,789 


1,724 


1,855 


1,982 


1,917 


2,008 


2,042 


2,121 


2,121 


Howard 


597 


581 


615 


660 


698 


708 


734 


762 


857 


861 


Kent 


285 


318 


317 


354 


387 


320 


360 


373 


375 


385 


Montgomery 


5,478 


6,113 


6,275 


6,708 


7,053 


7,394 


7,593 


7,614 


7,848 


8,199 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


7,020 


7,250 


7,566 


7,687 


8,072 


8,997 


9,416 


9,761 


10,224 


10,572 


298 


334 


279 


335 


386 


357 


322 


355 


362 


351 


St. Mary's 


916 


881 


1,029 


1,116 


1,085 


1,046 


1,124 


1,118 


1,430 


1,413 


Somerset 


432 


446 


427 


477 


429 


433 


388 


404 


403 


452 


Talbot 


435 


458 


451 


431 


499 


470 


472 


453 


467 


426 


Washington .... 


1,714 


1,794 


1,771 


1,869 


1,967 


1,929 


1,935 


1,957 


1,894 


1,895 


Wicomico 


980 


1,002 


1,019 


1,061 


1,094 


1,144 


1,149 


1,091 


1,141 


1,134 




565 


587 


554 


637 


590 


588 


561 


565 


568 


546 



90 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 20— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1951-1960 



Local Unit 



White Resident Births in Maryland 





1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


otal State 


47,992 


50,146 


50,918 


53,204 


54,548 


56,382 


59,122 


58,862 


59.538 


60,093 


Allegany 


1,792 


1,758 


1,691 


1,540 


1,553 


1,554 


1,638 


1,608 


1,643 


1,671 


Anne Arundel . . . 


2,322 


2,467 


2,734 


3,033 


3,137 


3,324 


3,752 


3,934 


4,197 


4,361 


Baltimore City. . 


14,938 


14,989 


14,628 


14,949 


14,366 


14,032 


14,305 


13,380 


12,577 


11,998 


Baltimore 


6,932 


7,382 


7,999 


8,560 


9,209 


10,203 


11,146 


11,260 


11,495 


11,606 


Calvert 


160 


186 


196 


169 


190 


175 


196 


183 


197 


195 


Caroline 


300 


325 


313 


301 


311 


352 


278 


346 


307 


304 


Carroll 


778 


922 


840 


881 


912 


942 


1,016 


1,040 


1,055 


1,034 


Cecil 


737 


834 


883 


979 


1,067 


1,173 


1,341 


1,153 


1,176 


1,190 


Charles 


397 


387 


457 


476 


527 


494 


560 


558 


549 


567 


Dorchester 


350 


342 


324 


370 


337 


327 


358 


349 


336 


298 


Frederick 


1,304 


1,306 


1,282 


1,369 


1,388 


1,431 


1,468 


1,438 


1,431 


1,488 


Garrett 


507 


497 


466 


448 


448 


470 


420 


470 


444 


449 


Harford 


1,426 


1,557 


1,493 


1,625 


1,763 


1,695 


1,755 


1,804 


1,858 


1,868 




480 


480 


499 


561 


582 


589 


613 


649 


743 


749 


Kent 


204 


224 


209 


258 


257 


215 


244 


247 


252 


274 


Montgomery. . . . 


5,122 


5,794 


5,899 


6,343 


6,720 


7,010 


7,208 


7,234 


7,450 


7,768 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . . 


6,157 


6,430 


6,705 


6,782 


7,108 


7,880 


8,290 


8,650 


9,042 


9,489 


197 


231 


190 


226 


254 


226 


205 


239 


243 


236 


St. Mary's 


690 


675 


812 


877 


831 


798 


831 


844 


1,120 


1,146 


Somerset 


226 


243 


223 


264 


225 


219 


197 


205 


192 


239 


Talbot 


281 


293 


301 


270 


337 


301 


321 


308 


324 


271 


Washington .... 


1,684 


1,769 


1,731 


1,825 


1,925 


1,882 


1,882 


1,909 


1,835 


1,851 


Wicomico 


686 


733 


735 


736 


771 


774 


797 


773 


769 


758 


Worcester 


322 


322 


308 


362 


330 


316 


301 


281 


303 


284 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



TABLE 21— Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1951-1960 



Local Uvit 



Colored Resident Births in Maryland 





1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


. _ 

Total ^tatp 


13 089 


13 019 


13 605 


14,241 


14 657 


15 726 


17 005 


17 135 


17 627 


17 403 


Allegany 


32 


27 


38 


37 


33 


29 


26 


26 


24 


19 


Anne Arundel. . . 


647 


665 


710 


778 


703 


712 


822 


828 


861 


824 


Baltimore City. . 


7,692 


7,786 


8,120 


8,574 


8,925 


9,750 


10,762 


11,084 


11,316 


11,264 




557 


555 


548 


497 


490 


498 


594 


499 


498 


442 


Calvert 


245 


241 


236 


262 


281 


238 


277 


238 


260 


263 


Caroline 


96 


107 


118 


104 


112 


108 


115 


119 


128 


132 


Carroll 


40 


97 


48 


40 


72 


53 


63 


55 


55 


61 


Cecil 


64 


67 


75 


75 


96 


88 


96 


99 


105 


97 


Charles 


385 


297 


368 


401 


410 


397 


426 


429 


426 


456 


Dorchester 


280 


243 


273 


262 


251 


289 


267 


267 


224 


249 


Frederick 


160 


132 


148 


150 


145 


166 


139 


139 


171 


174 


Garrett 


1 




1 
















Harford 


219 


232 


231 


230 


2i9 


222 


253 


238 


263 


253 


Howard 


117 


101 


116 


99 


116 


119 


121 


113 


114 


112 


Kent 


81 


94 


108 


96 


130 


105 


116 


126 


123 


111 


Montgomery. . . . 


356 


319 


376 


365 


333 


384 


385 


380 


398 


431 


Prince George's . 


863 


820 


861 


905 


964 


1,117 


1,126 


1,111 


1,182 


1,083 


Queen Anne's. . . 


101 


103 


89 


109 


132 


131 


117 


116 


119 


115 


St. Mary's 


226 


206 


217 


239 


254 


248 


293 


274 


310 


267 


Somerset 


206 


203 


204 


213 


204 


214 


191 


199 


211 


213 


Talbot 


154 


165 


150 


161 


162 


169 


151 


145 


143 


155 


Washington .... 


30 


25 


40 


44 


42 


47 


53 


48 


59 


44 


Wicomico 


294 


269 


284 


325 


323 


370 


352 


318 


372 


376 


Worcester 


243 


265 


246 


275 


260 


272 


260 


284 


265 


262 



92 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

TABLE 22 



Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 







Withdrawals by Code! 






Transferred to 






















Local Unit 


Total 


Other Schools 


























Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


wio 


Wll 


W12 


W14 


ELEMENTARY 


Total Counties 


21,514 


8,210 


283 


12,402 


51 


63 


162 




37 


22 


282 


2 








604 


311 


6 


264 


1 


4 


3 








15 








Anne Arundel 


2,898 


916 


45 


1,859 


8 


13 


20 




i 


'4 


32 








Baltimore 


3,522 


1,218 


48 


2,152 


9 


9 


42 




2 


1 


41 








Calvert 


154 


60 




87 


3 












4 








Caroline 


183 


50 




125 


1 








3 




4 








Carroll 


369 


105 


3 


246 


3 




2 








9 


1 






Cecil 


859 


277 




561 


1 


1 


11 




"i 


i 


6 








Charles 


363 


108 


8 


232 


2 


4 


3 








6 








Dorchester 


140 


50 




86 














4 








Frederick 


646 


339 


2 


276 


i 


4 


4 




2 


'2 


16 








Garrett 


137 


42 




82 






2 




7 




4 








Harford 


1,311 


498 


5 


768 


i 


3 


16 






i 


18 


i 






Howard 


431 


74 


11 


330 




3 


2 




. '.2 




9 








Kent 


123 


35 




84 






1 








3 








Montgomery 


3,336 


1,562 


92 


1,614 


6 


6 


9 




6 


■9 


32 








Prince George's. . . . 


3,816 


1,533 


43 


2,155 


9 


10 


22 




4 


1 


39 








Queen Anne's 


177 


46 




123 




3 






1 




4 








St. Mary's 


597 


99 


8 


474 


i 


1 


io 




2 




2 








Somerset 


135 


34 




97 


1 




1 




1 




1 








Talbot 


125 


44 


5 


67 






3 




1 




5 








Washington 


890 


526 


6 


330 


1 


1 


7 




3 


2 


14 








Wicomico 


496 


240 


1 


239 


3 




4 






1 


8 










202 


43 




151 




i 






i 




6 









HIGH 



Total Counties 


13,729 


1,844 


88 


5,084 


347 


45 


254 


258 


4,470 


37 


619 


86 


577 


20 


Allegany 


426 


54 


7 


100 


10 


2 


2 


8 


165 




38 




40 




Anne Arundel 


1,751 


219 


9 


678 


70 


5 


22 


40 


566 


'4 


70 


'4 


64 




Baltimore 


2,550 


276 


9 


854 


82 


7 


89 


87 


925 


10 


90 


28 


89 


■4 


Calvert 


112 






30 


3 






1 


65 


1 


9 


3 






Caroline 


133 


16 




50 


2 




3 




59 




1 




8 




Carroll 


321 


49 


2 


106 


3 


1 


17 




95 


2 


22 


2 


20 


2 


Cecil 


474 


51 


12 


206 


11 


1 


2 


'3 


165 


1 


5 




17 




Charles 


247 


18 


1 


86 


4 




2 


1 


103 




18 




14 




Dorchester 


139 


10 




48 


8 








49 




13 




11 






444 


83 


"2 


103 


5 


i 


'i 


6 


171 


6 


21 


i4 


22 


'3 


Garrett 


129 


2 




64 


3 


1 




3 


36 




12 




5 


3 


Harford 


685 


105 


"i 


321 


6 


2 


ii 


5 


174 


i 


29 


'4 


23 


3 


Howard 


253 


10 




120 


6 




4 


4 


82 




15 




12 




Kent 


114 


3 




34 


2 


■3 


2 


1 


51 




9 




9 






1,834 


377 


24 


793 


46 


7 


36 


44 


343 


ii 


61 


i2 


76 


'4 


Prince George's. . . . 


2,396 


383 


10 


909 


44 


9 


25 


36 


819 




75 


1 


85 




Queen Anne's 


140 


5 




59 


3 


1 




2 


48 




4 


14 


4 






316 


15 


'4 


184 


3 




'2 


3 


73 




24 


1 


7 






144 


5 




38 


5 




10 


1 


60 


i 


9 




15 




Talbot 


127 


5 


i 


27 


3 




1 




73 




10 




7 




Washington 


582 


151 


6 


138 


19 


2 


6 


4 


212 




29 




15 




Wicomico 


243 


8 




74 


5 


2 


10 


7 


95 




24 




17 


"i 




169 


5 




62 




1 


3 


2 


41 




31 


•3 


17 





* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1960-61 the school from which they withdrew — excluding kindergarten, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county W6 — Armed services 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic school in county W8 — Age 16 or over 

W3&4 — Transferred — Outside county W9 — Mental 

W7— Committed to institution WIO— Physical 

W13 — Death Wll — Economic 

W5 — Special case W12 — Marriage 

W14 — Suspended 



Maryland State Department of Education 



93 



TABLE 23 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal : 
State of Maryland: 1952-1961 



Year and 
LcKiAL Unit 


Average Number Belongimg per Teacher 
AND Principal 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 


1952 


27.6 


32.2 


21.7 


1953 


27.5 


31.9 


21.8 


1954 


27.4 


31.5 


22.0 


1955 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1956 


26.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1957 


26.3 


30.0 


21.7 


1958 


25.1 


28.0 


21.5 


1959 


24.6 


27.3 


21.4 


1960 


24.2 


26.9 


21.2 


1961 


23.9 


26.6 


21.0 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1960-1961 



Allegany 


24 


8 


26 


6 


23.1 


Anne Arundel 


24 


5 


26 


9 


21.6 


Baltimore City 


24 


6 


27 


5 


21.3 




23 


2 


24 


9 


21.4 


Calvert 


24 


5 


28 


6 


19.5 




22 


3 


29 


1 


16.9 


Carroll 


23 


5 


27 


9 


19.7 


Cecil 


23 


9 


27 


5 


20.0 


Charles 


24 


6 


28 


6 


20.5 


Dorchester 


25 


4 


29 


4 


21.8 


Frederick 


22 


6 


24 


8 


20.5 


Garrett 


25 


1 


25 


8 


24.3 


Harford 


24 


3 


27 


2 


21.3 


Howard 


23 


8 


26 





21.2 


Kent 


22 


4 


26 


4 


18.5 


Montgomery 


22 


7 


25 


3 


19.9 


Prince George's 


24 


5 


27 


5 


21.3 


Queen Anne's 


22 





26 





18.0 


St. Mary's 


24 


5 


28 


5 


20.1 


Somerset 


23 


6 


27 


5 


19.7 


Talbot 


23 


6 


27 


4 


19.7 


Washington 


24 


3 


26 





22.5 


Wicomico 


25 


4 


28 


5 


21.9 


Worcester 


22 


6 


26 


1 


18.8 



^Excludes kindergartens and elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



94 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 24—- Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions : Maryland County High 
School Pupils: June Net Roll, 1961 



Local Unit 


June Net Roll 


Per Gent 
Not Promoted 


Total 


Promoted 


Not Promoted 


Total Counties . 


179,280 


170,357 


8,923 


5.0 


Allegany 


7,815 


7,600 


215 


2.7 


Anne Arundel 


16,646 


15,964 


682 


4.1 




36,868 


35,079 


1,789 


4.9 


Calvert 


1,512 


1,477 


35 


2.3 


Caroline 


1,801 


1,758 


43 


2.4 


Carroll 


4,697 


4,527 


170 


3.6 


Cecil 


3,654 


3,374 


280 


7.7 


Charles 


2,931 


2,628 


303 


10.3 


Dorchester 


2,698 


2,599 


99 


3.7 


Frederick 


6,381 


6,117 


264 


4.1 


Garrett 


1,968 


1,889 


79 


4.0 


Harford 


6,946 


6,565 


381 


5.5 


Howard 


3,141 


3,012 


129 


4.1 


Kent 


1,349 


1,254 


95 


7.0 


Montgomery 


30,741 


29,538 


1,203 


3.9 


Prince George's 


28,581 


26,357 


2,224 


7.8 




1,467 


1,352 


115 


7.8 


St. Mary's 


2,285 


2,119 


166 


7.3 


Somerset 


1,770 


1,657 


113 


6.4 


Talbot 


1,665 


1,609 


56 


3.4 


Washington 


8,190 


7,956 


234 


2.9 


Wicomico 


4,058 


3,879 


179 


4.4 


Worcester 


2,116 


2,047 


69 


3.3 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



95 



TABLE 25 — Number, Per Cent, and Causes of Nonpromotion: Maryland 
County Elementary Pupils*: June Net Roll, 1961 











Number not Promoted by Cause 




Total 


Per Cent 










Local IImt 


Not 


Not 












Promoted 


Promoted 


Personal 


irregular 




All Utner 










Illness 


Atten- 


Imma- 


Causes 












dancef 


turityj 




Total Counties 


10,130 


4 


.2 


194 


352 


8,791 


793 


Allegany 


136 


1 


.7 


2 


3 


129 


2 


Anne Arundel 


1,254 


5 


.1 


24 


45 


1,169 


16 


Baltimore 


2,769 


5 


.7 


87 


49 


2,065 


568 


Calvert 


296 


10 


.7 


2 


14 


280 




Caroline 


86 


3 


. 5 


1 


7 


78 




Carroll 


252 


4 


.3 




14 


238 




Cecil 


467 


8 


.4 


6 


22 


427 


12 


Charles 


423 


9 


.7 


3 


57 


358 


5 


Dorchester 


80 


2 


4 


5 




75 




Frederick 


60 





8 




3 


56 




Garrett 


169 


6 


2 


5 


5 


159 




Harford 


436 


4 


7 


4 


18 


319 


95 


Howard 


134 


3 





3 


1 


128 


2 


Kent 


46 


2 


4 


1 


3 


41 


1 


Montgomery 


872 


2 


1 


11 


30 


772 


59 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


1,427 


3 


5 


17 


31 


1,370 


9 


69 


3 


3 


4 


1 


64 




St. Mary's 


262 


7 


4 


5 


27 


227 


3 


Somerset 


145 


5 


9 




7 


130 


8 


Talbot 


225 


9 


4 


5 


7 


211 


2 


Washington 


142 


1 


5 


1 


1 


130 


10 




282 


4 


6 


6 


1 


275 




Worcester 


98 


3 


1 


2 


6 


90 





*Excludes kindergarten and pupils attending elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
tlrregular attendance due to unfortunate home conditions, 
jlmmaturity — social, intellectual, emotional. 



96 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 26 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: 
Counties of Maryland: June Net Roll, 1961 



Local Unit 


First Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent not 


Promoted 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties. . 


45,254 


23,758 


21,496 


3,710 


2,404 


1,306 


8.2 


10.1 


6.1 


Allegany 


1,323 


681 


642 


79 


56 


23 


6.0 


8.2 


3.6 


Anne Arundel . 


4,700 


2,464 


2,236 


514 


335 


179 


10.9 


13.6 


8.0 


Baltimore 


8,959 


4,680 


4,279 


829 


538 


291 


9.3 


11.5 


6.8 


Calvert 


544 


287 


257 


75 


46 


29 


13.8 


16.0 


11.3 


Caroline 


423 


225 


198 


34 


23 


11 


8.0 


10.2 


5.5 


Carroll 


1,039 


556 


483 


98 


71 


27 


9.4 


12.8 


5.6 


Cecil 


1,443 


878 


565 


219 


136 


83 


15.2 


15.5 


14.7 




817 


410 


407 


130 


90 


40 


15.9 


21.9 


9.8 


Dorchester .... 


615 


317 


298 


35 


24 


11 


5.7 


7.6 


3.7 


Frederick 


1,333 


735 


598 


21 


16 


5 


1.6 


2.2 


0.8 


Garrett 


440 


217 


223 


44 


27 


17 


10.0 


12.4 


7.6 


Harford 


1,753 


934 


819 


134 


90 


44 


7.6 


9.6 


5.4 


Howard 


833 


411 


422 


84 


50 


34 


10.1 


12.2 


8.1 


Kent 


362 


184 


178 














Montgomery. . 


7,549 


3,873 


3,676 


327 


2i7 


lio 


4'3 


5^6 


3^6 


Prince George's 


7,716 


4,084 


3,632 


654 


409 


245 


8.5 


10.0 


6.7 


Queen Anne's . 


438 


225 


213 


13 


6 


7 


3.0 


2.7 


3.3 


St. Mary's. . . . 


686 


366 


320 


100 


65 


35 


14.6 


17.7 


10.9 




459 


263 


196 


46 


30 


16 


10.0 


11.4 


8.2 


Talbot 


434 


233 


201 


83 


45 


38 


19.1 


19.3 


18.9 


Washington. . . 


1,678 


850 


828 


36 


26 


10 


2.1 


3.1 


1.2 


Wicomico 


1,117 

593 


585 


532 


97 


61 


36 


8.7 


10.4 


6.8 


Worcester .... 


300 


293 


58 


43 


15 


9.8 


14.3 


5.1 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



97 



TABLE 27— Public High School Graduates: State of Maryland— 1952-61 : 
by Local Unit — Year Ending June 30, 1961 



High School Graduates 



Year and Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


BY YEAR, 1952-1961 


1951-52 


12,352 


5,741 


6,611 


1952-53 


13,356 


6,256 


7,100 


1953-54 


14,070 


6,670 


7,400 


1954-55 


15,161 


7,313 


7,848 


1955-56 


16,767 


8,019 


8,748 


1956-57 


17,122 


8,368 


8,754 


1957-58 


18,380 


8,891 


9,489 




20,462 


9,861 


10,601 


1959-60 


23,854 


11,560 


12,294 


1960-61 


26,923 


13,142 


13,781 


BY 


LOCAL UNIT, 1960-61 




Allegany 


1,091 


584 


507 


Anne Arundel 


1,768 


837 


931 


Baltimore City 


6,169 


2,945 


3,224 




4,124 


1,982 


2,142 


Calvert 


176 


89 


87 


Caroline 


231 


129 


102 


Carroll 


631 


304 


327 


Cecil 


396 


178 


218 


Charles 


315 


146 


169 




351 


179 


172 


Frederick 


719 


337 


382 


Garrett 


279 


142 


137 


Harford 


800 


397 


403 


Howard 


336 


170 


166 


Kent 


154 


81 


73 


Montgomery 


3,704 


1,862 


1,842 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


3,227 


1,547 


1,680 


156 


76 


80 




220 


115 


r 105 


Somerset 


217 


110 


jl07 


Talbot 


216 


105 


111 


Washington 


906 


462 


444 


Wicomico 


500 


252 


248 


Worcester 


237 


113 


124 



Ninety-Fifth 



Annual Report 



in -"J* o in o 



rH <Xl o w 

in m m CO 



a3(N-«*e05O (J) ifi -rf r-( 

C^(NNN>-1 1-1 N W (M 



Tl* ^ ^ CO CO ^ ^ ^ CO 



T-liCC£siOt- OC^NCO-* 

oio-^coco iO'<a<oico<^ 
Tf m lo o CD 



CO TP 



5Dtj<«di>n in .-( 1-t t- 

r-l r-l tH ,-1 T-l iHINCONIN 



t-inosincc «Cr-<i-ia5co 

(MOlOOO OOi-iOtJ* 

lOintotoin cDt>oooa5 



1-1 O O 00 00 

T-lOOT(«-.t 
T-l Tf 00 t- 



a; 1-1 i-H 
inoo o CT> 00 

CD W t~ 



cDt-t~t>oo ooosoNeo 



i-icDoeoo5 ooi-ht-<oc<i 

•^int-i-ii-i <£<j>(£>^-^ 

t^(NCDeoo eo__oo 00 ini-H 

incD'cD t-'od oo^oo oTrH CO 



(M CD O iH I- 

in in t- CD CD 

C0^«0_i-H t-^ 

cJco TjTincD 



(M O (N CO 
(M 00 CD in (M 

1-1 CO Ti< 00 a> 



i-iNco-^vn 
in in in in in 

O 



Maryland State Department of Education 



C o - 

L< O 
OCX 



.-H (N Ti< ec Tj< N 05 ■<J< n" CO 



1-t rH N rH ,-( ^ M 05 05 « 



CO 05 to CD 

O (Tj a: 31 



Cr. (N rH N (VJ 

00 35 c o o 



03t-lO05t- OOJCC-^OS 



00 1- lo in 1-1 













5 












to 

>. 


§ tH O 


Bo 



(NOIW05«£> CDt-OiOOt- 
i-H t-H t- rH O CO 05 
C^OOOOi-H T-IC<105 05CD 



COrH-^OO-* t-05iOT)<CO 
OC0r)<t-05 Tj< CO 00 it5 
^ ^ ^ rH(N05 05 Tl< 



C<J00a>rj<lO '-HCON'-HO 

OS i-i 00 i-i in 00 o CO 00 CO 
cococot-t- t-»a:0(N 



ocorfino o5>-iooa50 
inininino coco(no5o; 



05 Tj< CO t- 00 



O CO CO 05 00 
tXN o: 00 (N 

(X N in 00 1> 
rHcicicaos' 



inoocoiN-tf omcoojt- 

OOOOJi-ICT) OC-01C0(N 

CO t> o c^__c<i_ "^.^.^"^.>^. 

i-T i-TcJc^ca c<rc<fo5'"o5'"->* 



£ 3 



inrHOOoo 00 •<i< 05 i-i Tj< 
0.-IOO-r}< •^finooooi 
in CO r-l --j" 00 t:-t-Tj<CDC<l 



CO CO c~ t> 



00 X a; o (M 



CD1-ICOO05 OiOO'^^O 

05 in t- .-I ^coojcoco 

in t> N CD 05 o 05 M 00 in 

co-incD'cD-t-' oo'"oo''oo''ar^'" 



fc- 2 

O H 



^am-^in coi>ooa50 
inmininin inminmco 

C50i050505 O^Oi0505Ci 



100 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



S 





o 
J3 

CD 

5JD 



^ 00 00 ^ 



ooecoomo 
00 eo U3 o> 



-<f 00 a> c- 
a>oooO'a<(M 



t- 1- vcoo 

T}< CO O T)< 00 



00 1-1 in OS 
00 o o 



■^ONino (M^Oi-ia> oooOi-H( 



cow WOiTt 



o ot- ^ t> ?o 

05 1-Ht-O Oi 
lO i-H N CO 



M 1* CO 

e^cowc^ 



--iC^I-^-^O rHOSiCOOO iCr-lt-^^ ■•J'knOCO 

loeoc-irtoo if5c<iojooco tDcowec^o 



^ ^ 00 CO 
co «o -r)" CO 

CO 0^«£>_ 



O 00 t- M 

CO rH 



OOlftNCJSlft 

■-rineo 



?r>T-^ioo-<i' MOK5COJJ5 «Doooi-'eo o^oooj 
ooeooooico (Dinoioi-^ c^i-iT)<oas c^c<i->*<M 

T-(iOC0C^C0 CDC^C-CC'-i ^oO^OJrH C^Ot*C<1 



- OJ a; 
r I-, 

lllll 

=: C eS rt cS 



32 



q; 0) O e« jj 
£ c9 o 0) 

c ffi w w 



01 O C 00 



lis 



I sis 
^^^^ 



If 

It 



©a 

MM 



I- s 

0) o 
Si e< 



«75 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



UMOUTJUfl^ 



— SuiJTHOBjnoBniuo 
pn« 3iiunioBjnuBj^ 



puB sajBg ieojj3j3 



Suuaqmnq jo 



sjo^aiJdojj; 
puB iBuoissajojj 



(S80JOJ panijv sapnpnTj 
SJ931JO aDiAjag aAi!joa!)OJj 



araojj %v 



paujBj^ 



spoqog qSijj 
ajBnpBjr) )Soj 
puB "dajj a^aiiOQ 



qooqog 

[BUOpBOO \ JO 

'IBiojamtaoQ 'apBjj^ 



s]ooqag oisnp^ 
JO 'BcaBiQ '?jy 



SuiUtBJX 

joqDBax JO aSaijOQ 

jaqoBax 9»«1g 



.^•jisjaAiufi 
JO aSa^oQ 



sa'tBnpBJQ JO 
jaqtnnx moj. 



o ec c c-i 



CO to O O 00 CD 

(M • .-1 ec oo «o 

(MO 



CO o 



U? ^ ^ ^ 



^ _H lO lO OS 



CO CO <M U3 



«o e<no CO — "COCO— <o o io — <M icc<io 



' C5 CO CO 



C4 ^ lOt^ 



I e<5 CO CO CO CO 



CO UO 
CO • 
CO lO 



■>* ^ coco ■ 



(M^ lOOO 



^ lO ■ 



) ^ ^ Tti ^ CSl 05 ■«*< 00 00000->»<l 

lOioi^c^ cjcoic^c^ OTt<oco. 



iCCOCO00-<»< >ococo»«o 



jcocooco est--. — a> 



OiOi O "0 >OC5 oscococooo 



a)oo(--.coo oococ^io 

COCQCO'«»<-H (Mt~eO-^"0 



COIMlCOC— ' 00 CO — 
»OCOi-H^C<I •--i(M«OCO 



^ CO IN 00 OOOlOO'l' - 

-H^eccico coe^ieo— < 



!t>-COt^ OO 05 U5 Ci 



JlOCC^CO COTjflO^'^ Ot^(Mt^CO CO — < c; 00 



IIM — CO t-~ 3C 
) • C5CO • O 



t— COCOOCO •>*< — ca CO C5 

OC CO M 



IC CO 05 CO CO 



' (M « CO 



CO O CO C^l — 



(M eo CO CO 00 — « M 



• ODC<l CO COlfSOOlM 



> — < CO IM ■.-I 



CO (M miM 



OC l-i 



lO — — . OC 



CO c<» c: OC 



l« « CO CO 



CO CO CO <M UO >C CO • 



"7 ■"9" «0 CO S5 



CO (M CO <M I 

eo — "0 OC 

— O CO 



— OC CO CO 05 00 tr 



eo o 



I CO uo 



CO — "5 — c^^ 
~- — r - zr. 
OC «c 



-»< o; -"f" CO CM 
c; CO (M CO i~ 

<M CM — — 



uo CO — 
c^ c^ t— i~ 

CO — CO ^ 



00 CO uo t~ 
CO i ~ oa c 



o — CO CM 
cm"— ^ 



C^ICM — t^CM 00>OC:CMt^ •«»< O CO CO CO CM 'C CM OO 
CSCOCOCMCO C5 CM IC COT»<1~-000 OSCseMCM 



"2^ 
5 « £; 



5 ■cS'2"2 

4) O) O efl 



O O = 

C a; S 



a a <u -c o 

OOOOQ 



3 

S 
■a 

.S 



5 5 2 

•V S S S 
is 

<u o c; u 

4; = = = 



102 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



u 
> 

a 
a 



9DJ3raniOQ JO 



93anoo 



no^SuiqsB^ 



JO s2d\\0Q 



aSanoo 



9391100 



90J9airaoQ JO 
939noo gjorai^iBg 



9391103 jaqonoQ 



9391100 'BlOitO'J 



9391100 pooH 



9391100 uo')3uiqsB^ 



9391100 
a^B-^g pUT?I;{jBJ^ 



a39noo 
puBi^CiBj/^ uja-^sa^VY 



suijjdojj suqof 



IC • <M — (M 



9JoniiqBg 

JO X')ISJ9AIHfi 



aSailOo 
a^^lg UB3J0JY 



JO A^ISJ9AIU£l 



C<I ■ O (M iC C<l 



OC ■ CO — 



CO <X O <M OO 



CC (M CO C<l • (M CO <M . 



CO ■ CO cc 



o ^co 



; c<i c-i • CO "0 c<i ■ ic^ • c^ 



05 T-H o; c: »o CO — c£ c: 



— ■ CO C<1 



iC <M C CO --S: t>y • 



oc o • 



« M >C 

CO <M 



O CO O OC 



OC CO — - 



iC ^ O CO OC O CO »o 



siooqog pU'Bli^J'BI/^ 
IIV F^OX pUBJQ 



UO — : 



CO oc «c oc ■ 



coo — COC-. OCO! 



) C<J (M O 02 — lO 05 

:CO — — — — OiUO — 



. 3 O (U 

5^ est? .S:= 



a' 9 5 CO 



:-2 o- 



^Ss'i^-i ii'g^o g^^sls o.s§ I 
<;<ffleQO ooooa fccKKW gcucyMw pp::^^ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



93anoo 



aSajloo jotunf 



^tliuninuioQ 

S 33j09{) 93UUJ 



93enoo 
joiunf .Cj9rao3;uoi^ 



9391100 
joiunf pjojjBfi 



oSoiIoo 

JOIunf JlOU9p9JJ 



939nOO 

jojunf saiJBqQ 



9391100 

Xjinnraoioo X9SS3 



-moo aniASuo'iBo 



9391100 

joiunf ajonii'JiBa 



• M — ■ — 



oisnj^ JO jii(y\ 
-BAJ9SU00 itpoqB9j 



O i2 : 



CM • C^l ■ (M — • • ■ CM 



uosilox 



Xinqsii^g 



uiddoo 



oiMog 



CM ■>«< CM 



. o • — • — ■ 



CM • 00 



— CM —CM — 



! CO — cc U5 ■ O: "ff" 



I Hill 



-gj-^ : %-^<>^X : -5.1 is 



104 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





O 








































































(M . • 




n 
















































c<« • 


























ooiraooiji\^ 


o 


00 




































































Ui . 






m 






























































in • 








o 


CO 






<M • 








































■ 




CO • 














^ • 


tl> ■ ■ 


« 


CO 














































C<1 ■ 




















00 ■ 


OS • • 




O 


00 




































































CO • 




CQ 














































(M • 




















10 • 






lasjaraog 


O 
































































(M • 












CQ 
















































































O 


CO 








































































m 


CO • 








































































Branny uaan^ 


o 


CO 








































































P3 


CO 












































































CO 


• ■ C 


o • 






OS 


































CO • 














to 








• 


10 IM • ^ 


s,93jo9£) aonuj 










































































IM ■ 










■T-CO • 




(M iC'^t IM ■ • 
CO • • 


CO (M ^ • • 


- 




CO 




- 


IM 












00 












CO (M 








CO CO 




■ 






Xjomo3'}noj\[ 


o 


oo 


■ 050 








O IC ^ ^ 


O -"ti CO • 




■0 o 


















CO 
<M <M 


<M 
lO 






CO ""iti 

10 








CO 




C» • 
CO • 


«o ■ # 








— CO o 




>c ^ oo 








- (M — 






CO 






(M • 




CO 






00 10 ^ 
(M <M 


C^ 






(M 


CO 10 

CO 




CO 




CO CO -.-1 
CO 


CO CD ■ u; 




O 


. 






































































CO 






























































IM 








o 


oo 














































IM • 


















(M 






m 


CO 






































































o 


a> 










CO 






























<M 






IM 






CO 












ie> 


CO 




PQ 


t- 








(M 






























CO 




(M 






<o 












<M 






O 










































































PQ 


(M 








































































5{0U9paaj 


O 


CO 
CO 










(M <N 




































IM 



























PQ 


<M 


















































CO 




OS 
















CO ■ . 




O 


o 










































































— ^ r 








<M 




(M 
































IM —1 


• (M 
























O 


o 












































(M 


















<M 






PQ 


CO 
















































■ iM 


























O 






















































■<M 








• CO 






03 


— s '~ 
































































IIOJJ^O 


O 


o 










• C<l ■ 
































• • CO 






■CO 










■ m 




CQ 
















































•>o 












•<M 


•CO • • 




O 


!>. 








































































PQ 


OO 




















<M 












































•IM 








O 


CO 






































































pq 


CO 
































































•<M 








O 


lO 




CO » 




• (M >0 »C ^ 




• CO 








• 05 














■ CO t ~ 


• Q 









• 00 










• CO 

• <M 


:^ : : ! 


























































































Cvl IM <M — < ^ CO 




• CO 








• CO 








• (M r- CO — 1 


• OD 




• ^ 




• ■ IM 




■ IM 


• . . ^ 




O 








■ CO OO l> 






• IM • 












• IM 




• CO 


• CO 


• 








■ CO 






■ <M 


. t-, (M • 
















































































pa 


S : 




CO r-l 


■ IM C- 


5 (M 




• (M OS 




• (M 


. CO !M • 


• <M 




• •« r- 

— 1 


• CO 


■ 50 CO «5 




H ,-1 (M OS 
(M 


■ CO • • 


ppunjy anuy 


o 


^ : 


















• c 










-.— CD 












• . <M ..-i . . 


m 


lO 




• — 1 r^ <M • 




• (M 




















• (M to 


• -"tl <M — ■ 


■<M 












o 


OS 
<M 




















• <M 




















. .0 


• OS • • 


pa 


■^f 

CO 




•(M 




• IM 






• <M 








• — IM 
















■ iM 








• - <M 






c 


1137 




C5003COOCOOOCO-Ht^(M50(MO^-^ — lOCOt^OO 
^ ^ (M IM ^ CD(M 


• -^CO<M 


• CO CO 


• <M 

• OS 




•t^r^OOr-HOOtOt^-'tKM'-- — 

■ in ^ IM — 1 m CO (M 




<M 
IM 




(M CO OO 05 CO ■ 
<M T-c IM CO (M CO • 


■ Tt< CO C<l 
•C^ COt-i 


(M CO <M 1:0 00 Tt< CO 0( 


D<MCOCOCDlMO0(M(Mei 
.—I 00 C 






TfTflOOSCOCOIM-^t^COlOT-iC 

OS CO i-H ^ CO a 





State 




ind Total 

Alabama 


Alaska 


.2 


o- 

3 " 

■« 

O 


3 

:i 
= 


District of Columbia 


Georgia 


Hawaii 


Illinois 

Indiana 


Iowa 

Kansas 




2 


i 
■« 


2 
2 

i. 

V. 


%' 

3 

3 


Mississippi 


^' 

% 


i- 

5- 


1 


1 
= 

i 

•J 


1: 

I* 

^> 


5 


North Carolina 


i 

li 

^ c 


c 


<; 


Pennsylvania 


3. 

r 


- 


! 

3 
3 

Ik 




< 




Virginia 


West Virginia 

Wisconsin 






O 













































































Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



Art— Arts 
and Crafts 





35.226 
38.5 

1,842 
2.774 
11.378 
133 
279 

704 
367 
250 
401 
1.361 

274 

1.659 
446 
256 

3.239 

6,197 
126 
603 
37 

1,654 
1,055 
191 


P3 


36,233 
38.8 

1,843 
3,276 
12,075 
231 
275 

799 
394 
460 
394 
1,483 

367 
1,493 
416 
255 
2.267 

6,509 
141 
567 
46 

1,771 
987 
184 


Music 




50,69.' 
55.4 

2,718 
4,339 
12,792 
490 
696 

1,994 
922 
874 
917 

2,112 

678 
2.351 
1.042 

498 
4,934 

7.131 
469 
723 
595 
267 

2,607 
1.073 
477 




48,136 
51.6 

2.539 
3.820 
12.488 
463 
615 

1.747 
921 
823 
897 

1.957 

608 
2,199 
1.025 

495 
4.630 

6.984 
440 
614 
575 
344 

2,560 
934 
458 


Physical 
Education 


a 


73.585 
80.4 

2,582 
6.022 
18,556 
553 
791 

2,130 
1,593 
1.084 
1,106 
2,641 

542 
2,335 
1,208 
629 
12,146 

11,264 
670 
1,050 
884 
690 

3,042 
1,350 
717 


M 


80,389 
86.1 

2.795 
7,061 
19,092 
701 
823 

2,183 
1,649 
1,222 
1,2,55 
3,009 

736 
2,648 
1,430 
590 
13,284 

12,587 
679 
1,106 
899 
713 

3,554 
1,579 
794 


Business 
Education 




23,47^ 
25.7 

1,001 
1,678 
4,246 
193 
397 

830 
706 
406 
395 
865 

342 
1,193 
526 
171 
3.384 

4,170 
239 
375 
241 
231 

962 
592 
333 


CQ 


10,075 
10.8 

458 
479 
1,212 
116 
218 

433 
348 
219 
213 
601 

128 
556 
114 
120 
1,674 

1,642 
163 
165 
177 
145 

372 
346 
176 


Home 
Economics 


Voc. 




CO QO CO CM -O • eO c CO • —< • t— • CO CO 05 -CM 1^5 -O 
CO • CM kO -t^ • — 03 »0 ■ CO -CM -CO m ir> -00 CM ■ ■«»< 
■<»^CO 10 CM '-H.-H ^ CM •"l"^^— 1 
CO 


^ 




45,302 

1,706 
4.250 
10,006 
373 
609 

1,275 
1,217 
661 
546 
1,754 

487 
1,656 

836 
420 
5,267 

8.017 
324 
758 
564 
260 

2.517 
1.300 
499 


In- 
dus- 
trial'" 


« 


55.574 
59.5 

2,173 
5.068 
11,645 
347 
642 

1.525 
1,406 
517 
657 
1,823 

577 
2,112 
956 
367 
8,211 

10,768 
389 
573 
396 
297 

3,125 
1,417 
583 


41 1 


P3 


CM 03 «0 05 ?0 «5 CO>000»OCM O »0 05 r-< CO 03 CO O >0 CO 

• Oco^oiO coooai-^a> o>oooa>>c »ceocM^co o^^o 

coco ,-1 CO CM CM,-cC<l T-<T--^ CM ,-, ^ ^ i-< 
CO 


French, 
Spanisht, 
German a 
and Russian b 




17,240 
18.8 

303 
1,311 
3,492 
66 
61 

245 
214 
117 
181 
366 

71 
547 
285 

80 
5,773 

2,408 
143 
250 
166 
194 

540 
229 
198 


CG 


14.5711 
15.1. 

230 
l.ll'.t 
3.05!t 

59 

185 
208 
101 
151 
305 

78 
522 
267 

45 
4.445 

2,280 
109 
222 
150 
171 

496 

206 
120 


Latin 


a 


CO •^t--<noo3 C04CCOOOCO cmO'^oco ■ ■ r~ o aso • 
• ooocM-^os t^oot^r-.«o cooor^co>« . . — , o o • 
oo_io -^^os cmcmt-hco coco 


m 


lO CM •^(o-^mco t^oooob-eo cjicoooco - ■ >o oio ■ 

• CO>«OCOt~ CM-^O0t»<t-< — COt^CMCJi CO • • 00 • 
Orr CO^OO CMC.JOSCO CM—H 

co" 


Mathe- 
matics 





74,076 
81.0 

3,162 
7,088 
16,031 
647 
710 

1,933 
1.582 
1.186 
980 
2.669 

777 
3,008 
1,291 
620 
12.253 

11,316 
591 
939 
795 
693 

3,235 
1,704 
866 


« 


81,938 
87.8 

3,319 
7,805 
17,641 
735 
765 

1,983 
1,689 
1,273 
1,132 
2,831 

918 
3,253 
1,493 
592 
13,820 

13,268 
606 
994 
830 
670 

3,647 
1,714 
960 


Science 





63,522 
69.4 

3,149 
5,458 
15,734 
647 
762 

2.104 
1.649 
1,315 
1.083 
2,647 

795 
2.539 
1,303 

655 
8.751 

5.780 
670 

1.091 
837 
774 

3,170 
1,761 
848 


CQ 


69.774 
74.7 

3.410 
6.078 
17.437 
711 
809 

2.200 
1,732 
1,310 
1,165 
2,871 

951 
2,698 
1,477 

587 
9,765 

6,851 
650 

1,119 
833 
774 

3,656 
1,793 
897 


Social 
Studies 


« 


58.400 
63.8 

3,372 
7,734 
7,471 
597 
920 

2,162 
1,961 
1,176 
1,143 
1,131 

825 
1,511 
1,017 

732 
13,.596 

4,817 
660 

1,226 
584 
789 

2,227 
2,012 
737 


58,551 
62.7 

3,469 
7,927 
7,414 
607 
943 

2,003 
1,903 
1,125 
1,187 
1,133 

824 
1,473 
1.080 

685 
13,967 

4,648 
658 

1,189 
572 
769 

2,359 
1,951 
665 


Corct 




29,576 
32.3 

377 
662 
11,264 
167 

297 

285 
142 
1,945 

183 
1,992 
550 

3 

9,124 
82 

34i 
106 

1,699 

357 


« 


31.647 
33.9 

470 
760 
11,798 
199 

350 

336 
159 
2,066 

225 
2,045 
629 

i3 

9,761 
95 

368 
103 

1,864 

400 


Total 
Enrollment* 




91,467 

3,937 
8,001 
18.742 
768 
920 

2.475 
1,970 
1.523 
1.321 
3.228 

1.009 
3..588 
1,563 
732 
15,459 

14, .534 

788 
1,236 
921 
880 

4.059 
2,110 
1.103 


m 


93,333 

4.051 
8,798 
19,232 
806 
958 

2.392 
1,914 
1,524 
1,371 
3,374 

1.051 
3,619 
1.681 
685 
15,619 

14.954 
776 
1.200 
930 
859 

4.370 
2.070 
1.099 



^ 5 

3 



1-^ a - £ 



3-B 



-j: n S ^, &H Cf-r. -rr^ 



2 

CO p 



3 o 



CO o o CM CM o; 00 

— CM <» 10 CM 
O CM 



: :|22o 

3T3 oC SP.g 

^^^-^ i 



< S ^ 

-.So 

•Jr. B 



00 00 to C! o o 

CO • CO CM CO 
O CM CM CO 



<2 z 
o 

-a < 

3 P 



1-5 



coiS 

1^ 



a a CO o CM 05 



1 II: 



OS o ^ 



— < oc — 



I g o 



1^ 



ZD ^ ■ - — 



2 



a 



lOG 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



X C y c 



c<o o OS eo «D 

00 O O tD O 

w o ec os^rH eo 



• N 00 O «0 Tj< 
•C-(NOOC<JOO 



^5 ^ ^ (M t- Irt 
00 (M C<l 1-1 00 00 

irt -"S* ;d t> o c- 



^8 



«r> tc eo 00 o irt 
CO -<t 00 a> t- o 

O 00 00 O^i-H^t-^ 



00 't t> CO 
Tt (N 1-1 (M to 
05 1-1 O C<1 1-H 



d O M C-1 CO Oi 

OS t- ec o t- 

,H t- -i* Tl< 



00 CO t— ec »-i 
mooc-oeoN 



N^rHOOMr-t 

<D t- eo IM »j3 



tH .-H CO 00 irt 00 
1-1 CO to O T}< CO 



\r> f:^ ^ y-t 
olct-00000 
Ifi o> ec «D 10 



or o N CO 
M 00 CO --I a> 

(J> t- 0^__05 

oo'"oo'oo''eo"oo''oo'' 

C-J CO CO CO 00 CO 



t- 1- o a> t- CO 

CO^t-CO-^rH 

in to lO t- c~- 
CO CO m t- 00 



T-( «0 CO "tt 00 rH 

c~ eo ix> '-^^eo^'-<^ 
r-T-nrif5,-rco*'5D" 
CO m t- a: o 

tH 1— 1 iH tH iH CO 



«0 t- 00 05 o 

ic in m in CD CO 
I I I I I I 
10 CD ^- X oi o 
10 in iciom CD 
iji ^ o> 



■rH -in 



coeooooo cor-icoco 

t-inCO»HCD rft-O-^ 
»H Ol 00 CD T-l 



co«oo -1-1 in^in 
T-i -OS 00 in t- 
• CO CO >o 



■CO CD 

■oeo 

■rHCO 



OTt<C0C0t- -^MrHi-lTSt OOOiOOOi-H t-i-lOOt--^ CDini-l 
COmrHOOrf" CD<-(0000 5D 00 CO CD CO CO O CO CO CO ■^y-tiO 

t-H«cO'-ico cD-«*eococ- coooeo'-ioo oo co co co co osmco 



ojOMTfeo 

Tl< Tt O X t- 

OC0--I -H CO 



t-i-it> a>co 
x.-tx«in 
in 00 CO w 



'*-*-!f^« eOi-ieo«eo ocoo 
t-o-Hoieo CO o CO ^ CO mmm 
coo-*th,-( xcocococo i-Hinco 



—leoxt-^ cDt-xt-x 

OCOCDCOX XCDCD05r-( 

co_^inx^coco CD in -t CO 
r-^'co'in ^-T 



o>-«f>neoo t-coinini-H mcDX 
Oit-Hxot- »-iinocDin t-»-ico 

COOrfCOCD COCO'S'COCO CO CD CO 



-^coeoinx eoocoxco »-ico«eoo5 

t-t-inOTf oi^Ti<t-cD t-coco'«tt- 

co__05 x^eo CO X t- in co__ eo eo^cD co »n 

i-TcJcd" th i-T in 



eo r-i X o OS 
xa>cD-^i-i 
CO CO CO eo 



eorHcoeo-^ coict-xco ocOTfrfx ascooosm osxoi 

rHXCDeox «OTj<cot-co Oi-hxi-io ttoosocd mcom 

t-__x_^co eo o^x CD in in m eo lo eo_co eo t-_^x 

i-Teo'c-* -H t-T CD <d" th 



eot-ojoseo cooiCDinm 
co^oi'ifas -*cD0500 
cocoxcoeo oiXCDineo 



X X ^ 

eo CONOCO 
T}< in X 00 eo 



eoocDCDin o^i-ieo 
t-inrfosco 05CDX 
coeoioeoeo cDas-^t 



in oi o ■<3< X 
X t- 1~ t- 
03 eo OS in X 



OieocDcoco 

00 X^O_CD CD 



in a> eo t- T-i 

in 05 rH CD 

o^cotjio 



T)< '^Jt CD .-I X CDO— I 

xcDeoineo coxo 

Tfin^f oot> '^'-l.c^. 

oTrH CO^r-T »H x'-^CO* 



cDi-Hincoo 

t- ^ OS CO c- 

X co__o_in cD__ 
oTd'o'co'co'' 



CO 05 a> o o 
o a: t- m X 

— I .-I CO X OJ 



rJ<COeOXCD 
CD X CD i-H rH 
»H t> OS^i^CO 

co't-''eo'"i-re3 



cocDxeox 
eo --I i> X eo 

CDXt1<XO 



OMni-H 
i-H in CD 

o'lnco* 



:t3 

c< ^. C S 
= c cs rt ca 



^7373 ■ O 
^ u u ■ to 

a> o cfl • ^-. 
fct: ^ c g 

CU O 0)0 



•C 3 +i O 



m8| 
.Sg s 



Maryland State Department of Educatiox 



107 



i 



i Other 


OS (N tH t> 00 ?0 
00 05 Ol O 00 
^ »n <» t> (N 

* 


1 

Consumer | 
Problems 1 
and 1 
Economics, 


o t- o ^ o ec 

00 M t- M 

m in <a t- 


Economics 

and 
Sociology 


1,127 

895 
1,141 
1,337 
1,502 
1,572 


Psychology 


a; o a-. 00 
N ;£>■.£ .-^ ;c cc 
ec ec t- ^_^o^c^_^ 


Geography 


00 a; X c 
o (M 00 o a; 

OS^Ol IN (N t- 


Problems 
of 

Democracy 


lO (M a: X >C 

eo 00 00 ic ^ ■I' 


United 
Statt^s 
History 


15,907 
17,209 
19,343 
22,151 
24,610 
28,971 


World 
History 


t> o eo 00 M «D 

kfl -^N 00_-^^t> 
1-1 <-< (M CO M !N 


Civics and 
Social 
Studies 


i-H in (T. :d a> o 
00 CD m ;o -"t a> 
c-__ ec t-_^ oo__ 

IN lO 00'"^-'"t-'"'H 
N CO N (N (N fO 


Social Studies 


Eighth 
Grade 


«£> t- CO ^ M >n 
i-H 00 O t- CO CO 

lo 00 eo^un 
;o 00 oo''oo""o? 

CO CO CO CO 


Seventh 
Grade 


00 o ^ so "-^ o> 
eo 00 eo a> ^ «c 

O 0> lO irt 

oToooo'eo oo'in 
CO CO CO CO CO cc 




< < 

5S 



CO O CO CO 
irt O O t~ 'f t~ 
00 3^ in a: ^ —I 



Oi ■<* 00 O CO c 

t- eo Oi 00 a; cr. 

CO O Oi 00 



■ lO • 00 



Oi o 
t- 1- 



• CO o 



in -rf X IX o 

o t- oi X in 
CO OS 



a: X t> in X 

C5 OS o 
so so CO 



ocomx^ soco:ox«i< oi«ot-xt- t-aicoO'f co-^-h 

cocoxt-5D Tt<cot-ico^ xo-^inco coTteooix ^o-<t 

t-ooco^co sDrfcocoo coxeor-ix t> ^ co m co 

i-T'T co" 



Otj<ti<coco soeoTfcoo 
t- CO X X CO a-, t- X t- X 
o t- »H ,-1 CO in «o so in X 



«C Ol CO X 

CO a: X r-H CO 



Tl"OC0S0-^ '-iC0t1< 

coosococo c-inco 
a; CO CO CO so »- m CO 



coinxoo ojt-insoso C5co«£>co<o 
<x>cot-co«o Tfsoxxin aixxot- 
o-toococo 5£)incocot- cot>cocox 



OOXXt- ^CCCD 

tocoxtcin 
■^-^cococo inmco 



SOCOCOOri" ONCO -CO 

CO OS in oj SO oii-tTi" -CD 

co__co__x__co so X t- in ■ c-i 
i-Tco'cD 



rHCOXCOt- 

SO CO -ft CO 

CO so CD CO in 



soTfcoinco -"taseo 
xcccococo cot~co 

COCO-^COCO — ^CO 



Ot-C0«DC0 COeOOSJCD 
t-OCOCOOl COOCOOCO 

cDinxscco ococdtI't}' 



©eot-Tteo 

O^XtHOI 

locoecco 



COCOt-^CO t-CDif 



incoos'^oi CD in OS o o 
inoxscso ojincDineo 



««Oit-eo cr. cDcDCDin co ^ co 

CO CO O X in Tl< Tj< CD COCDX 

TTint-coeo incoinsoso t-o;-^ 



xsot-oeo co-ti<co--in 

XX-tt-CD — CDCOSOt- 

CD^^O^Ol^in X_^ X^X_^05 CD_^CO_^ 

t-'t-'^'rH -^"co'co'co'cD* 



t- ^ CD 
in CO t- — 1 
c o CO f m 



o in in in t- 
in OS — CD X 
CO 'i' •'f X 



o: CO in 

-1" CD CD 

— a: -H 



CO X oi X in m m 

05 0-. OlincD ■tfCOCDXX 

o^c-__o^cD__o^ a-;^o^o^c-_^in 

x't-'o"^*— * Tt-»r CO* cjx 



m in o: 
cD so in — o: 

co't-'so'-- 



05 oi in c~- 

mn CO 
o; in m o 



X CO 
CO_Tf CJ 
x"-<T CO* 



^ 3 £ 
S C c3 « cS 



• ■ ■ 0- 



« o ca ■ -J 
fC S c c 

C3 rt O 4,0 



•C 3 ^ 5 .-3 

(X O'er. H 



O bo 

coC 

oT.S 
2£ 



co-d 

C C 

<U<N 



.20 

W05 

c.S 

at ^ 

|i 
wo 



be 

p 

CO . u 
1-1 >> u 

.rs o 

^f^t^* 

,£ --CD 



W a> a 

03 C -w 

c c . 

ca cs VI 
.«e.Si*aj 

0) 5 

.. oTv 

.£ C i 
C c 

? 5 CJ 

_o< c 

2 § 3 
OJ 3 c 

Ml 

C CO 

wco 



108 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



3 c 



• lO lO 1-1 (35 C£> 

• t- «0 CO i-H 



O t- 1-1 (N 
t- 00 <-! lO lO 



00 ^ tJ* o t- 

(j^;o ea (3>^ 
r-TiN cc ec -"f 



.-( >0 tC t- 05 

■rr as in r-( lo CO 

0>_00_(N«D(NO 



a; o so <N ?o 
X ;d lO o> o 

IS ".a t> oToo" 



(N«CeO<Ot-iM 

N eo CO 00 o 



rHOOXMCON 
00 0> r-( lO t> U5 
0^0_^__C0^05_«0 

oooco «d'<d t-^ 



•«f 00 cr> CO OS 
CO <-i t- --I ifl 

t- C- CO 00 i-i 



73 



"I 



lO u5 a; oi 1-1 oi 
ooeo(Nt-ooo 

t*» O rH CO 



oooo«o>-ioo^ 

OCO«Or}<'*(N 
rH lOCO 05_O^C0 

vn Ti<"rf irt in 

T-l (M (M (N (N <N 



00 CO CO to 
CO "5 t-i >o to ai 

to in rH CO »-< (N 



OitOOOrHtOtO 
OOCOOTfNO 
CO ^ ^ 1^ 

00 r-( r-( (M N CO 



ineooooi 
mioioininto 

Oi 05 05 0> Oi OS 



OS o 

CO 1- 



ooiomwto tot-NooN 



ot>-^toto oo'i'coo t-t-eoc<it> c^Meo<-ito i-e^r-i 
icc~o;coio oototooi -^ooc-o: co^ooiC^J \n iD 00 



«-^c-c<ieo o>tOTi<c<iC5 
t>mifiico t~ to CO i> ^ 

CO 0_tD_^ rH r-t <-( rH CO 



a: to lo as o 
to in 05 in t> 
in.-i (N 



a;oot-oot- cr. t)<oo mm 

otoeo»-it> towt-oco 

c^__o^ai_(M <N to m -<* o_ 
.-TiNin i-T 



o T}< (N a: 
o to CO o m 
eoomiNm 



(Noom 
as CO o 
CO M --I 



otot-o-* rfoao 
coc<ia5toto cotco 
coc<icocac<i mt-eo 



T-i to to m as 
OS mi-i aso 

T-H_t> CO 

i-Tco" to' 



OS m OS <-i 
CO to as o 
as tc •<* CO as 



^ocom moo-Ht-o os't-^ 

5C0f<t O0000->tX i-i(NtO 

<^to c<i to_^ co^N CO c<i m m CO 

r c<r in 



mooco-^Tf oomooooo 

toostocoos OTfcot-as 

to^-># oo__co CO o^oo to in co_^ 

r-Tco't-- i-T T-T 



oeo 1-1 -t 



■CO o OS m o 00 o 
■ OS OS o to 00 (N as 
• CO Tji Tji CO t>xco 



CO -asoseo aiasomo 
CO •as'<a<as t-tooom 
m -oococo asooc-mco 



OOtJ-Ot-CO 

comeoo-^ 
'S'Tft-cooo 



t-tototoin <nthco 
toeo-'fosto eotooo 
cocomcoco t-asco 



OS to 00 

mcot-mt- 
inmi-icom 



■«a<i-( moooo 

O00C0-<t.-l 

CO CO to CO in 



tot-ocoto 

Tl< CO 00 1-1 

t- cot- com 



'cococom T-imcot 



rHOOOOO 

eocorHt-Ti< 
to__co__co to__m 

C0'".-Tco''rHrH 



t-meooco mt-oocom 
asTfootot- >-ioocotoo 
mtOtHcom cocotocom 



t-toosmc- 

Tj<t-O-S<00 

t-coascot> 



t>comtoas ooooi-i 
cocoi-it-'5i' tomm 
t-coootom oomt- 



ieoi-iT-t TfcoiMCom i-imcor-ioo cot-ico— ii-i 



o ■ 



6o6p£ owww§ p^a^t^H 



o; o c« J -S 
fc"? ^ c g 



o c 

lis 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



SJD 



■5 



III 



its. 



O i3 

£ 6 

O 



m2 



^11 



§1 



^8 



1-H cC ' tr* ^ 

«D ri< ca eo t- Oi 



eo OS ^ ic lO 

«5 05 OS 00 t- 



;d t> N krtec « 



N lo ca o t- U5 
c- ^ irt i> oj 00 
Tf^oo^^oo^o o_ 



•<1< --I 1-1 Ol kfl '-H 
•<f l> 00 TfCO 

lo '-rT t-' oT o* 



CO xt «o 
oooeo-^ect- 
« o inN u5t> 
»o ?o t> o; Oi-r 



eO 05 U5 ^ 

Oi t- -H »-l t- 

t-^ <Ji^ (N OJ^ 

r-t T-l rH ,-H <N 



lO 00 «0 lO t> CO 



OS 10 1/5 Ol 1/5 t- 
Mt>00iO5Oi-l 

CO ^ 00 eo 50ec 



oooooseoiO'* 

C5 O Ol OO 05 00 

CO* oo" o6" t-'o" ec 

(ri (N (M CO CO 



00 05 to 00 N OS 

eo xt 00 in oi^rH 
00 x"oo « oo'co" 



(X — ' X CO 
X ^ c<j a: -H 

ca o'aTc'sc CO*" 



-H ^3 in .H 

a-, o cc c- o5 o 

cc'cc <N cot>'«o 



cet-oooio-^ 
\a in m in CO CO 

incc t- X i 
in in m in >n CO 
a. c; <3i 



489 
1,022 
2,516 
158 
i 121 


o CO in X eo 
t— CO ^1" 03 

r-l CO t-H -nt 


t-OOSi-H^ 

OS o in T-( in 
inco i-H CO 


OS ^ O CO t- 

t- CO X CO 


CO t- 

CO o in 
eo 


in CO o t- CO 
t-CT>in«o 


«cot-co.-< 

CO c- X OS CO 


Tt OS T}< CO eo 
eo i-i OS in o 


T)" X OS —I in 
X OS X in CO 


eoi-HO 

-ICO in 


CO X m a; 

D5 O CO N 
.-H CO c- 


oint-r-ix 
o CO CO CO o 


• OS • • o 
■ —I ■ • t- 


in CO CO 
CO CO eo ■ X 


OS in CO 

— 1 ■<S« CO 


osox o 
(N X cr. <N 
^ -ICO • 


CO CO f CO X 

CO '-o CO 


X c o ^ OS 
m eo CO 
m 


o: • • CO 
CD • ■ ■ — 
CO ■ • • 


•cDeo 

■X -1 


X X o cc 

O CO X X 


t-coeoeoo5 
— < CO CO eo t- 
eo^THi-Hco 


coint-Tf ^ 
xxcoxTf 
eo <-! t-^ 
co" 


inxxino 
eo CO OS X 

co" 


r-ICOX 

o in X 

CJ 


CO Oi <75 CO 

cot-^xx 

CO X 


X OS in— ( OS 
t- CO OS OS 

t-H r-l —1 CO 


CO CO CO eo 
CD in X t- 
co — x__ 

CO 


^coosoco 
eo t- in X OS 


o CO m 

t>t- CO 
CO CO tH 


CO <s CO coos 

t- CO CO ■5)< 


i-H -i" t- eo CO 
oi in X Ti< t- 
■<t eo CO CO CO 


©xin-*i-< 
in t- OS CO OS 

^ t- CO 05_ 


3,777 
212 
251 
264 
108 


xcoin 
o int- 

-<_inrH 


-*eot>^ • 

^ CD [- CO ■ 
CO 


CO t- X CO 

■ in eo eo CO 

CO 


T)< t- 1> 

^ in.-H o 

CO t 


CO ^ • o • 

^CO T-l • 

CO ■ ^ ■ 


eOTf— 1 
— I — 1 

CO rH 


Tfcoo-ieo 
CO CO m in X 
X CO ai^^i-i 
i-Tco 


X CO X o t- 

t- CO CD 

CC CO CO CO 


•'S' eo ■>*' X CO 
CO CO X o CO 
CO CO CO —1 in 


t- O i-l © X 

o OS in CO 

X_ CO ^ 

co" 


CO CO OS 

oseo 

XCJCO 


CO t> X 

in t- o lo X 
in eo^x^^co eo 
T-Teo'co 


1,008 
845 
643 
577 

1,394 


^ ineo o CO 

OCO-HOSt- 

eo CO CO CO 


X o o OS in 
eoeoosoo 
eo CO >«r ■'4' eo 


1,139 
664 
425 



ososososeo osos— iinco xxot-o eot-cocom ^tot- 

ot~osTj«as t-coooos cocooocc OTfrtosco oscox 

mt-xeoeo osxt-mo -^int-eoo^ eocomcoco cD__os-<a" 

^co't-" * " * " 



1-ieococoin co-^o;coo 

X OS t> X t- ^ t- m — 1 o 

•rf x^co_^eo_^Tr o-^iN Ti<_-^ in 

co'-^feo'i-r-^" co'eo'co'co'in 



in Tf CO re 

OS CO X ^ 
CO CO t- CO o 



fft-eomco coxco 
X o: eo CO o X — 
in— loscoco X^rX 



■rr o: — ' ro t- in t~ t- ^ eo 
CO X i.o X t- CO X in X X 
^-"XcoTT ocoTfi-Hin 



coineoi-c^ cDcocot- 
^ eo CO — ' n o m CO 



_ OS CO 

. . .IX X c- 

t> eo_oo co_^x_ CO cj o:_^cD^r?^ i- x^ 
Tco'co t-H*'* ^■'— r^-^*^" co'eo"^" 

CO 



CO 



■ c • 

■3 4* ^ y£ 



E 

1 = 5 



110 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 






s 

4^ 

S 
c 

U 



9i 
BS 

3 

Si 





s 



•t-eori<oot- 

• o m o> IC t- 

• rH .-I iH to lO 



• CO -H «o CO in 

■ -rj" 00 rH OS 



• O ^ 1-1 lO C<1 
■ 00 1-1 Oi CD CD 
•(Nt-<NTHr}< 



00 eo »0 CD 
CD i-( CD OS CD irt 

CO* 03 in cd" t-* 



•CO OS OS eo OS 
■ 00 eo CD Ti« 

•i-ilN-«tO00 



•t-i-HCOCD 35 

• ^ 35 3i CO 

• 00 35 00 O 

' c<f ofeo -^"t-" 



•Mcor-it-eo 
•ooeoOrHc^j 
• 35_N co__o_io 
"eo ioco*35"Tjr 



o loeo CO CO . 

t-OOt-r-lt-. 
CD U3 eo O 35 ■ 



•t-O35CD00 

• lO 00 in th o 

. ,H ,-1 rH lO t> 



■ 00 rl< ,-1 C<J CO 

■ t- 00 Tj< o eo 
.■^f t- iceo__cD__ 
■(Mcieo*'* eo" 



• t- 00 35 

• CO 00 00 CD 
•CD_^CD__Tj<_-<f 

■ CO*-* in "^'-ff 



iniM M T)< 35 s> 
(M O in 35 o 

in cD''t-^35'"35od 



4 

OS J 



CO t- 00 35 O rH 

inminmcocD 

I I I I I I 

inCDt-00 35 

vn in in in in CO 

35 35 35 35 35 35 



•0(M 



i-l(Nr-( ■ • 
++C0 • • 

++ . . 


•CO • ■ ■ 


■tH ■ -O 


^laoi ■ ■ 

CO rH 


in • ■ 


i-(ooo -co 

t-rHt- -(N 
,-1 CD ■ 


■eo • -co 
•in • CO 


CD -co 

•oom -35 


in •!> • ■ 

35 ■ 


t> CD - 

X CO • 


r-( 35 35 -co 

eo t- 35 • ^ 

rl rH (N ■ 


■CO • -CD 

• 00 ■ • m 


• CD in • o 

• CD CO' ■ 3: 
■ rH -35. 


-CD ■ ■ 
t~ -X • • 


o o • 

CO r- • 












t- 00 -35 
i-i 35 -CO 

(NJeO'-*^ ■ 


•t-l • -35 
■ C- ■ 00 


■rHrH -35 

■CD 35 -00 
• CO t-_^ 


o in CO ■ • 

rj" rH 35 ■ • 

eg • • 


CO CO • 
cot- • 

COrH ■ 








CJ 




C<I CD ^ -co 
CD ^ -1-1 


-<t ■ 35 -t CD 
CO ■ CO CD 1-H 

■ -i— 


■ O t> Tf 

■ CO CO rH in 

-i— 


inCD 35 • • 

in rH rH • • 


O CO 
CO ■rr 


t> c- O CD CO 

t> CD ^ in ^ 


^eOO0 35M 
TtXOCOO 
CO rH CO 


00 o t- 35 in 
CD o eo CD CO 

CO rH in 


r-l t- rH rH 

cooeot>co 

0_r1 rH rH 


CD CO CD 
O 35 
CO tH 












t> 35 (N in 
35 o in in in 


in 00 —1 CO « 
CD CD o ■>* in 

THT-(rHi-ICO 


rH 00 1- CO in 

00 00 00 CD 

■*C0 rH 


rJ<rS<OinrH 

in rH CO 

rH rH CO CO CO 


X t- O 
••t'^X 
inrH rH 






CO" 






CD (M in « ^ 

1-1 t~ <Z>(X> 

CO oeo^^'-t 


Oi-iooeoco 
CO in rH CO 00 
CO coco in 


35 00 rH in rf 
O CD CO in 
rH X ■rj< r-l rH 


o t- o CD in 
coeoXrHCD 
CO CO eo eo CO 


•>* 35 X 
t- in rH 

t-coeo 






X 


co' 




• CD CO • • 
■ CO • • 

* • • 


. . . -O 


•CO 35 -Tf 
■CO 

■ * 


t- • ■ 

<Xi . • ■ ■ 


X 35 • 


o ^ —1 -^t in 
CO CO in 
eo iH CD 


'*t-C0 35r-t 
-cf CD t- rH t- 


rH Tj< CO CO t> 

cooincocD 

CO 35 


X • CO ■ 
• -rH ■ 

CO ■ • 


CO CO • 

coco • 

CO rH • 


00 CO •'t t- CO 

35 00 in coco 
eo i-i c- r-i 


35 CO 35 CD 00 
in CD 00 O 00 
rH CO 


OC0 35XX 

eo CD c- CO t~ 

CO 35 


^ • ■t- 

t- • • rH 

CO ■ • • 


in o • 

35 o ■ 

CO CO • 


ooeot-'Ht- 

CO CO 00 

t> eo i-i 


CO CO rH in 35 

OCOCDCOCD 

^ ^ ^ Tl< 


rH CO 'S' O 35 

inrJ in 

inrH rH 


CD ■ COt- 

X ■ ■rH rH 

(X) • ■ 


mm • 
X • 

CO Tl< • 






CJ 







o . 



=3 C 03 c3 c« 



oj o ca ^ 
d d o 



• : : c 



Maryland State 



Department of Education 



111 



'o 
o 



8 
S 



K 





'C 

3 



111 
WO 



bog 



^2 

K J 



^ to C4 CO 

in 00 >o o !£> 

C*D CO CC CO CC 



N t- t- d t- 1-1 

O to 00 «o t- o 
o CO t- to ec 



eo ai CO <x> a> 

lO rt" O t- CD 

as c- o lo i-H 00 



o> o in (N M 
N O 00 in CO 

CO CC CO CO CO CO 



in oi CO (M 
o in 00 1> 
o CO m CO 



1-1 in -i" 50 Tf o 
in 00 CD CD o<i 00 
00 00 1- in CD 

CO CO CO CO CO CO 



O O M —I O CD 

t~ t- CO CO ^ 
N*c^ciec'co"N 



—I a; X a: CO —< 

rr CD o 

odo"— TcD'oTin 
CO •<-< ii" in 



CO t- 00 NO in 

^ f C- •>:J< .1 o 

in « o> in rf N 



OS O O CO t- 

^ C5 CD rH 

CD CD t~ t- O 



CD t- 00 C5 o 

in in in in CD CD 

in cis 00 05 o 
in in in in in CD 

^ 



eo<N 
CO in 



cDOoieooi inc-^oo'* t-ocDoi^ 
oint-t-o t- ^ CD in oocDcoNcD 

C-NOeOCD NMCDint- -^cDXt1<(N 



OSNCJiCOCT! i-(M-<1<NtJ< OOOCOOi-i 

coot~rj>o ■n'^ainoin t-icdcdc<jo 

C<linO-^CD rfCOt-CDC- CD CD « in 



t- 00 o t-oos 
1-iNincDcD eo o OS 
o_co t- m (N 



t-CD.-tCD-<l< CDOeO 

-«f«i<xineo incoin 



o 05 o> in o> 

CO t- 05 o 



(i-l y-i T-( in 05 



N^(M rH^ 1-1 



inoscDinos coxxmco omososo -^oooieoo vnco-^ 
ocoi-HOso co«o:i-iOi os«ooj« inecNr-ico cd.-<05 

-I CO (N Mi-IIM rHi-li-l (N r-lr-<TAr-^^ CO ^ 



CD OiN 
CO CO CD 
1-1 (N CO 



cooscot-co uoo: t-t>-* 
05Xt--^c- x^^inco 
ooioco'-D Kt-^incDX 



^ CO ' 



CO CD X t- CO u5int-t-co t-ect-t-in 

t-t-XTj"* CO — I r-c in CO t- CO CD 'D CO 

rHOCDeccD in-«i<incDX in^oseocD 



. ^ eot-co 

^05t-a;05 coox 

X CO m CO CO os^Tf in 

oT co'i-^' 



OiOJeo«Dt- xxec 

C0Xt-O5Oi C-T-HX 

xcomcoco ^Tjiin 



XXrl<t-CO inOt-t-Tf 

coi-icOTft- co-^i-iinco 
coco-«*<cocD inTfincDX 



t-05cot-in x^eocDt- ^ineo 
t--»toicDX coa>t-0505 xeox 
incoocoo o:coincoco i-i-<tin 



O O C3 ^ 



° o - 
.Eg 8 



112 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



•r)< OS 00 O O VO 
00 O «D Oi CX) 

t> 00 •<s<__<;D_a5 irt 
c<r 00* ^ o CO* 

1^3 U3 m t- 



4 

< < 

"I 



N Lrtic o t- a> 

C*3 CO ^ 00 

t- CO N Tj< .-H eo 



cr> ri< ec o c- 

■sD O -n* lO CO C~ 

<M ?o ^ a> 



CO CO ij3 O CO <x> 
CD CO O Oi (M 
tH CD t- tD O C<1 



o in OS as 00 CO 

CO in CO (M-^ CO 

CD"c-'"oOo"Tf CD 
IN IN CO CO CO 



CO 00 05 »-< C5 
W 00 rj< t- if3 
00 Tj< CD 0> N -<1< 



CO N i-H t- CD (M 
(M m CO >0 05 CD 
00 CD O N iOt1<_ 

t> 00 t-'oo'co"'-* 

-t rj< m 



0> CD 00 W t- CD 
CO CD (N 00 (N CD 
t> 05^00 N(NCO_^ 

in CD in t-'-rfc^T 



(N 00 05 C: CO X 
CD 00 CO N Oa 

in cD__oo_^in oc 
co'in co'in o'co" 
C5 d o 



X t- X t- 05 
05 T)< X 05 

o -"a^cD^^co^rH CD__ 
C<r CO* N* ■^* o* o* 
■5j< rj- m in 



t-l —I O CO CD 

CO CD in CO CD CO 

^ t- X O ^ 



in o: t 1 in 

o o Ti< X inco 

(NNincOCDX 



CD t- X Oi O r-( 

in lO in in CD CD 

J5 CD ci- 0(3 05 O 

in in in in in CO 

<7> O ^ O O iji 



MIMCDCO'-H 

X N in in oi 
in o in in t- 



o CO CO 
CO 05 X o 
»-i in o »-( CD 



ojinxosco 



o o o 

f -^eooM-^ cct-inxo5 

5_ in CO_^N CD 1-H N CD OX CD 

1* (Nr-T (M* r-T ,-r 



(NOt- 

in^ 
ocot- 



in>-iNT-ico 

01 CD 05 o C<1 
t- O O t> X 



CO 05 in o> 
X N in o 

tHCDNNO 



CO X o o 
CO CO 05 X 
t-CD-<tin(N 



t- oi CO oieo 

X t- O 05 ^ 

in CD r-( X 



int- 01 
mint- 



t- CO X Tl< 

c- X ini-H 

C0_O CD_^(N CO__ 

in CO t-'rHi-T 



05NCDi-l o 

--1 Tt o CO in 
eo^iN co_^co__co_ 

^*CO*iM*(N"in" 



X CO X o; O 

t-XCOt-^CO 
<N Oi CO (N 



.-H OiCDCOCO 

in inx o 
xeO'-it-Tf 



CD 0>t-l 

in o5 in 



(M X CO 05 

Ti< t- 1- CO c- 
xt-eOi-Hcq 



t- O t-l T-t 

ocoinoco 
t-co(N-<teo 



Tj<0:CDC0 0i t-COCOt- 

t-in-^inco 0-. (Noeo 

(MCD-<*(N(N ,-(rHCO 



cocom'-Hin oiTfo-^eo 

-^C-t>COt> OSOSCDOIX 

X^N 0_(M (M t- CO CO r)<^ 

t-Tco'ei 



t-cccoint- 05i-Ht-co 

CD05>-lincD orrco-* 

CO •^Tf oj in in 

.-T T-T (N* CO 



inoco ■<#•<* 
xmincoin 
CD o T}< CO in 



CO o in 
o CD rH oj -n* 
int- 1- X 



i-<(M(N'-lCD cot-oec 

■*incoi-io ocDt-x 

CO y-^oo in in t> c<i --h 

CO* m* IN* i-i* 



loc^in 

(NTf t- 

CO* IN 



^c^Jinox inmt-rHin 

C~COC005t- COO>(NO<M 

(MTfco-^x CJOioioeo 



ot-X'Hco .-icoinoico 05«ec 
r-c^Noin i-ixoiiNO i-Ht-x 
t~Tf,-ixeo -^-^t-coco oiOTjt 



c-xt>eoco NosOi-iN 

O-^i-HCDO COOXtHX 
OlOCO-^X '-lOXO'H 



(NCOX-^l". 

in 05 c<i CD . 

CO(N^ CO. 



i-ioeoinTj* Xi-i 
(Ntr-osi-H05 eomx 
'^'S'cocDeo t-05-<i< 



XOINCO-I t>Tft-(Mt- 

c-xininx 0500^0 

^_^T}<^cD__oi co_^ eo__o_ooo^in 

CD*X*CO* r-T ''tlN^fNTj'* 



(NOCDin-^J< (NCDXTl<t- cOCO-ij' 

cD-«i<incoco eoinxr}<o> meoco 

eo_t> IN -^^-"j^ x__05 "^^OJ CO a: 

r-T -^* IN* .-To -** T-T,^ inc<f 



XOiOQOCO ^(N-^tr-M 
^COOlOSOl 03C<Jt-»^'-l 
t-COt^'S'CD OiOiXOir-i 



x^MX-^ THOicoint- t-eot- 
t-inTfosco cocoiNCTico ot-t- 

CDCOOTfOi i-i'l'C^iniN CDO-<J< 



o> o X CO in 

CO N X CD r-( 

m X CD 



t> ^ CO t- t> 

IN (N 01 in 
t- o: X X 05 



xosinmo -"tOTfin-* o-^x 
005IN01CO x-^T-^t--^ coeoin 
cD-rHO'^co oi-^comco inoi"* 



t-0>OC0-H i-<C0t--*O5 

mmxin^ rtTtoi— ico 
IN.-IINOieO t-xcoxo 



cDot>eo-^ ino:c-o.-i t>t-in 
XU0C005C0 FHOcot>^ cDoeo 
iNinooiin T-i05co^co i-ioos 



Ir-lr-iTt T-lTl<(N 



M 

I c4 

!WUO 



«J SS s 



a; O cS 
rt cs o a> o 



a> d £ -i^ 



© « 



- ^- ° o 



Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



§1 



1^ eo u5 OS o oi 



Salesman- 
ship 


O; ifl 00 00 t- t- 
lO .-H 55 lO O Tf 

O lO o> o 


Business 
Law 


i^lOOiON 
t- rsi (£) iQ la 


Business 
Economics 


-H N Tf 00 —1 irt 
O 00 00 O N !0 


Book- 
keeping 


CSNC-C4CO00 

N 05 o eo 00 lo 
in lo 5C c^t> 00 


Stenog- 
raphy 


OS 00 OS 1-1 O CO 
00 1-1 O CO iO o 
N «o C<>^t>00 

vo if5 u5 ;o «r 


Personal , 

and 
Academic 
Typing 


Tj<?Ot-00NN 


Advanced 
Typing & 

Office 
Practice 


O 35 00 t- 55 U5 

M 00 ec !£> to eo 

eg -^O 0^«-^ 05^ 


Typing 


«0 05 ^ t- 

05_io« o_ a;_^ 


General 
Business 


05 05 M lO t— 
05 O-H t- N 
lO 00 ifi O^OS^N 


Total 
Excluding 
Duplicates 


t- T)< c t> rt -1 

lO ec N ifl i--^ 
e<5 r?oo •^^i.'j 


Total 
Including 
Duplicates 


05 eo ^ « c; !C 
ec ^ la N 05 N 
io_«5_;o -^r o-;_x_ 
t-'oo ec t-^— Tin 



CO C~ W 05 o ^ 
lO lO lO CO CO 

Jj ci t!- 00 05 <i 

iO VO lO LO ^ CO 
0> 05 05 0> 05 05 



o o 



«0(M ■ • 

^ • • 


•« ■ -ec 
•CO • ec 


^ OS • • X 

eg • 05 


t- . . o 
o; • • •^ 




M 1-t t- 


■ i« X CO 


^ X • X 
T ■'I- — 1 t~ 


2^ 2 ■ ■ £J 


X • • 


• 05 ■•I' o o 

•cot-eaeo 
t- 


O -N -05 


. .(D 
•CO • -Ui 


C005 • • • 
t-co • ■ • 
eg ... 




loeo coeo 

■<t N « CO TP 

C- U5 .-1 


CO o ^ cc ^ 

O CJ la CO N 

eoM.-<^cg 


oj CO CO eg CO 
o o; eg 05 ^ 
1-1 eg X 


oo^ego 

O iO o t- 

t-^ 1-1 


XCOt> 

o eg CO 
>aeg-^ 












»OU5t-C-M 

ecco^_^ T-< 


u5XTi<eo»-i 


oegcocoio 
eg 05 eg CO CO 
^ eg 1-1 05 


t- 05 ^ U2 lO 

X eg CO lo 


Tfi-icg 
pjcoo 












■•t U5 « 1-1 Tj" 

05ceNt>05 


i-iOO^X 
(MOCDXC<I 


•eg CO 1-1 CO 
•iccgcJ05 


O5cocoo»a 
■<i< eg CO CO 1-1 

X 


i-<eo vo 

05 05C0 












lOCO CO 05 

Tj< in 05 ec 
cc « X — 1 


xcoeoifflo 
CO 05 CO (N o; 
c<i eg — — M 


ic X la la CO 
o-. O iC X 
^ X 


05 X t> 05 
X O i-O X 


ooco 
CO eg 


vnojt- CO CD 

X'S'CgOlt- 

lo o^co_^ ^ 


XXiOCOCD 

m o X o 
cg CO ^ eg 


CO l0 1* CO eg 
xcooj-^ft- 
— eg co_ 


X X lo c- n< 

Tf 05 lO 
CO__i-l 1-1 rl 


Tf CO 05 

t-eorf 






OJ 






t— CO X ^ 
vO O ^ — < 

I-l t- N 


O ^ X m ^ 

O5vocgt- '* 
coeocg^ia 


eg 05 ^ 
xo5eooco 

-H T-l »-( X 




eg CO —I 












05 t- X 05 lO 

ui lo la o 1-1 

CO 


CO »ft X CO 
CO uo eg c CD 
eg c CO CO 


C O: X 
C~ -V-^ 05 l.O 
t> CD N 


eg eg c X CO 
-H o -^r — 

X__^ UO CO 


""J" X 05 

CO CO o 
CO o: la 






— ' in 


la 





o; o X 'if 
la t- CO la CO 
CO eg la o: 



oiaegb-t> cooi's-Ttcg 
ocg — t-x cDcoxx — 

--CCC05— X t- C~ 



oxTffeg t-oi-^ 
cDxegccg — coco 
o Lo X »o ;d ^ CO t- 



3 « 
c "3 



III 



E 

O C 
a cs c a; o 



Hi 



05 03 
CO « 



CO o 

fe. " 



eg o'O 

if « 1 



IS 



s o a* 
< MO 

i o 2 



« c 

3 Or-t 

« 3 « 

lis 
sis 

lit 

•-co 

* 2 g 



114 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 43 — Pupils Enrolled in Driver Education and Training: Maryland 
County High Schools: Fall of 1960 



Year and 
Local Unit 


Driver Education* 


Driver Training! 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955—56 


414 


180 


234 


5,174 


2,308 


2,866 


195g_57 


1,311 


619 


692 


5,719 


2,611 


3,108 


1957_5g 


970 


472 


498 


6,772 


3,247 


3,525 


1958-59 


1,191 


571 


620 


6,464 


3,158 


3,306 


1959-60 


1,301 


666 


635 


6,583 


3,114 


3,469 


1960-61 


2,470 


1,285 


1,185 


6,987 


3,515 


3,472 




BY LOCAL UNIT 


FALL OF 


1960 






All©g3.ny 








479 


268 


204 


AnnG Arundel 














Baltimore 








1,640 


844 


796 


Calvert 














Caroline 


93 


'5i 


42 








Carroll 














Cecil 


522 


289 


233 








Charles 














Dorchester 








iso 


■93 


'87 


Frederick 


960 


5i6 


444 








Garrett 














Harford 








578 


29i 


287 
















Kent 


146 


59 


'87 


61 


25 


'36 


Montgomery 


488 


240 


248 


1,744 


883 


861 


Queen Anne's 








747 


341 


406 


34 


'i9 


'i5 


189 


91 


98 


St. Mary's 








161 


74 


87 


Somerset 














Talbot 


isi 


63 


68 


143 


71 


'72 


Washington 








319 


171 


148 


Wicomico 








753 


363 


390 


Worcester 


96 


48 


'48 









* Driver Education — Classroom instruction only. 

t Driver Training— Classroom instruction and behind-the-wheel training or behind-the wheel training 
only. 




Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 44 — Pupils Reported as Members of Glee or Choral Clubs, Orchestras, 
or Bands: Maryland County High Schools: Fall of 1960 





Glee 


OR Choral Clubs 


Orchestras, Bands 


Year and 














Local Unit 
















Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


1955-56 


12,181 


3,744 


8,437 


10,152 


6,795 


3,357 


1956-57 


12,983 


4,386 


8,597 


11,121 


7,262 


3,859 


1957-58 


10,425 


3,075 


7,350 


12,802 


8,317 


4,485 


1958-59 


12,222 


3,767 


8,455 


12,970 


8,353 


4,617 


1959-60 


12,336 


3,778 


8,558 


14,701 


9,479 


5,222 


1960-61 


13,319 


4,033 


9,286 


16,506 


10,505 


6,001 



BY LOCAL UNIT, FALL OF 1960 



Allegany 


931 


308 


623 


872 


412 


460 


Anne Arundel 


1,148 


304 


844 


1,148 


757 


391 


Baltimore 


3,112 


916 


2,196 


2,566 


1,658 


908 


Calvert 


245 


105 


140 


126 


78 


48 


Caroline 


231 


60 


171 


302 


178 


124 


Carroll 


416 


170 


246 


495 


318 


177 


Cecil 


153 


40 


113 


372 


234 


138 


Charles 


159 


42 


117 


403 


216 


187 


Dorchester 


124 


68 


56 


266 


147 


119 


Frederick 


734 


256 


478 


745 


473 


272 




258 


84 


174 


246 


127 


119 


Harford 


499 


130 


369 


642 


373 


269 


Howard 


170 


68 


102 


301 


181 


120 


Kent 


339 


118 


221 


253 


144 


109 


Montgomery 


2,094 


646 


1,448 


2,609 


1,869 


740 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


1,362 


392 


970 


2,890 


1,850 


1,040 


30 


8 


22 


192 


103 


89 


St. Mary's 


32 


17 


15 


166 


91 


75 




130 


61 


69 


41 


27 


14 


Talbot 








203 


129 


74 


Washington 


840 


175 


665 


1,112 


731 


381 


Wicomico 


177 


37 


140 


289 


220 


69 




135 


28 


107 


267 


189 


78 



116 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 45 — Number of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of Public High 
Schools Offering Each Subject: Counties of Maryland: Fall of 1960 



Local Unit 


Core 


Arts and 
Crafts 


English 


Mathe- 
matics 


Social 
Studies 


Science 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Business 
Educat'n 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 




m 






CO 


CO 




to 
a> 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


to 


CO 

a; 


to 




to 


a. 


to 




to 




-§ 


§ 


1 


"o 










1 





'0 




8 


.a 


1 


-g 







g 




8 




H 


o 
CO 




CO 


i 



.c 

0, 

CQ 





CO 







c« 


eg 


1 


u 


cs 



.A 

s 






i 

H 


CO 


Tnt^l r!niinfip<! 


1 ,006 


114 


108 


67 


1,483 


196 


1,494 


220 


1,281 


176 


1,207 


216 


113 


96 


233 


161 


99 


80 


410 


122 


Allegany 


25 


8 






84 


11 


59 


11 


59 


10 


47 


1 1 


7 


6 


5 


5 


2 


2 


19 


6 


Anne Arundel. . . 


40 


2 


'2 


'2 


258 


13 


191 


13 


241 


13 


89 


12 


6 


4 


16 


10 


*5 


*5 


37 




Baltimore 


354 


20 


42 


18 


121 


15 


275 


25 


111 


13 


294 


24 


22 


16 


43 


24 


t25 


t25 


73 


13 




8 


4 


3 


3 


25 


4 


18 


4 


17 


4 


12 


4 


3 


2 


3 


2 


10 


2 












31 


7 


15 


7 


26 


7 


19 


7 


3 


3 


2 


2 


*i 


'i 


12 


4 


Carroll 


13 


7 


13 


9 


49 


12 


41 


13 


43 


12 


39 


14 


1 


1 


9 


7 


18 


„ 


Cecil 










42 


7 
8 


39 


7 


47 


7 


36 


7 


3 


3 


4 


4 


'2 


'2 


19 


6 




11 


4 


6 


6 


41 


33 


8 


35 


7 


33 


8 


2 


2 




4 




11 


4 




7 


2 






24 


6 


21 


6 


25 


6 


19 


6 


2 


2 


3 


3 


•• 




8 


4 


T^'rAflpri pIt 


/ o 


o 
o 


c 






00 


7 
( 


55 


1 f\ 

lU 




7 
1 


52 


1 n 





ft 



9 


7 


1 


1 


19 


6 




9 


3 


4 


2 


24 


3 


15 


4 


19 


2 


19 


4 


1 
6 


1 










5 


2 


Harford 


80 


7 


10 


6 


45 


7 


75 


7 


40 


7 


51 


7 


5 


10 


7 


4 


3 


25 




TTr»W5»rn 


22 


5 






24 


5 


26 


6 


29 


5 


26 


6 


3 


3 


5 


5 


1 


1 


8 


3 


Kent 






'3 


"2 


23 


4 


18 


4 


23 


4 


16 


4 


2 


2 


3 


3 






6 


4 


Montgomery . . . 


'i 


'i 


2 


2 


319 


24 


210 


24 


279 


24 


159 


24 


24 


20 


53 


24 


120 


12 


65 


15 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


291 


25 


6 


6 


140 


26 


181 


31 


86 


13 


99 


28 


10 


9 


30 


23 


"30 


"22 






3 


1 


4 


2 


25 


4 


14 


4 


17 


4 


17 


4 






4 


4 


1 


1 


'h 


"4 


St. Mary's . . . 










27 


5 


24 


5 


25 


5 


23 


5 






5 


4 


2 


2 


9 


5 


Somerset 


9 


5 


1 




16 




24 


7 


19 


7 


25 


7 


'i 


"i 


5 


5 






9 


5 


Talbot 


2 


1 






15 




17 


3 


17 


3 


15 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 






9 


3 


Washington .... 


43 


9 


6 




52 


9 


79 


12 


35 


7 


63 


12 


6 


6 


8 


7 


3 


2 


18 


7 


Wicomico 






1 




48 




41 


5 


41 


5 


34 


5 


4 


3 


4 


4 


2 


1 


13 


4 


Worcester 


15 


"2 






21 


I 


23 


4 


20 


4 


20 


4 






5 


4 






9 


4 





Agri- 
culture 


Industrial 
Work 


Home 
Eco- 
nomics 


Physical 
Education 


Art 


Music 


Driver 
Educa- 
tion 


Library 


Guidance 


Adminis- 
tration 
Supervi'n 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Local Unit 












































to 



1 




m 
"o 




to 

8 


2 




JS 


to 

"o 


m 
.C 


1 


to 



8 


CO 


m 

"o 


m 


'n 

1 




1 








u 
c3 
<I> 




J3 

eg 


c« 




CO 


i 

H 






u 
cs 
<u 
H 




eg 



eS 


CO 


ci 


CO 


? 



JS 

cn 


es 

H 


1 




TO 


Total Counties 


76 


60 


525 


197 


430 


208 


816 


221 


280 


164 


510 


217 


111 


96 


261 


208 


368 


209 


506 


219 


Allegany 


4 


3 


23 


9 


20 


9 


31 


11 


11 


9 


19 


11 


8 


6 


11 


9 


10 


8 


19 


11 


Anne Arundel. . . 


2 


1 


43 


12 


34 


12 


55 


13 


24 


13 


38 


13 






15 


13 


29 


13 


37 


13 


Baltimore 


5 


2 


99 


23 


70 


25 


145 


25 


65 


25 


89 


25 


12 


ii 


51 


24 


75 


25 


115 


25 


Calvert 


1 


1 


3 


2 


6 


3 


7 


4 






6 


4 






5 


4 


5 


4 


8 


4 


Caroline 


5 


4 


9 


7 


8 


7 


16 


7 


'4 


"4 


11 


7 


"3 


'3 


7 


7 


7 


7 


8 


7 


Carroll 


4 


3 


16 


12 


20 


14 


32 


14 


3 


3 


27 


14 






15 


14 


15 


13 


23 


14 


Cecil 


2 


2 


13 


7 


13 


7 


20 




5 


4 


12 


7 


'6 


'6 


7 


7 


8 


7 


13 


7 


Charles 


6 


5 


6 


6 


8 


7 


20 


8 


3 


3 


15 


8 






6 


6 


8 


7 


13 


8 


Dorchester . , 


2 


2 


6 


4 


5 


4 


15 


6 


3 


3 


9 


5 


'3 


'3 


5 


5 


5 


5 


8 


5 


Frederick 




4 


14 


10 


14 


10 


37 


10 


11 


10 


27 


10 


7 


7 


12 


10 


13 


10 


20 


10 


Garrett 


3 


2 


5 


2 


5 


2 


13 


4 


2 


1 


7 


3 






3 


3 


4 


3 


6 


4 


Harford 


3 


2 


22 


7 


16 


7 


26 


7 


10 


6 


20 




7 


7 


7 


6 


12 


6 


13 


7 




2 


1 


8 


4 


8 


5 


15 


6 


4 


4 


13 


6 






5 


5 


5 


5 


10 


6 


Kent 


2 


2 


4 


4 


5 


4 


8 


4 


2 


2 


8 


4 


'4 


'4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


6 


4 


Montgomery . . . 


5 


4 


104 


24 


58 


24 


149 


24 


43 


23 


59 


24 


19 


10 


41 


24 


71 


24 


81 


24 


Prince George's . 


3 


3 


88 


31 


82 


31 


134 


31 


61 


31 


8a 




15 


14 


29 


29 


51 


30 


74 


31 


Queen Anne's. . . 


3 


3 


4 


3 


5 


4 


8 


4 






8 


4 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


4 





4 




2 


2 


4 


4 


6 


5 


12 


5 


6 


5 


6 


5 


5 


5 


4 


^0 


5 


5 


5 


5 


Somerset 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


4 


13 


7 


1 


1 


5 


5 






6 




5 


5 


6 


6 


Talbot 


2 


2 


5 


3 


6 


3 


6 


3 






5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


Washington .... 


5 


4 


30 


12 


23 


12 


30 


12 


11 


8 


26 


12 






12 


12 


14 


12 


18 


12 


Wicomico 


4 


4 


10 


5 


8 


5 


16 


5 


7 


5 


9 


5 


5 


4 


5 


5 


8 


5 


8 


5 




2 


2 




4 


6 


4 


8 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


4 


7 


4 



* Includes one teacher and one school teaching German, 
t Includes one teacher and one school teaching Russian, 
i Includes four teachers and four schools teching German. 
' Includes two teachers and two schools teaching German. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



T VIJLK 16 — Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1961 



Number and Per Cent Men Teachers 



Year Ending 
Junt: 30 




Total 


Elementary 


High 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


1,048 


14 


2 


591 


9 


3 


457 


43.3 


1928 


1,136 


13 


8 


574 


8 


4 


562 


39.6 


1933 


1,347 


16 


1 


617 


9 


4 


730 


41.4 


1938 


1,613 


18 


6 


766 


11 


5 


847 


41.8 


1943 


1,464 


16 


6 


561 


8 


8 


903 


36.8 


1952 


3,263 


24 


5 


709 


9 


5 


2,554 


43.3 


1953 


3,628 


25 


3 


822 


10 


2 


2,806 


44.9 


1954 


3,885 


25 


1 


866 


9 


8 


3,019 


45.4 


1955 


4,406 


26 


2 


1,019 


10 


6 


3,387 


46.7 


1956 


4,818 


27 





1,098 


11 





3,720 


47.3 


1957 


5,114 


26 


.7 


1,074 


10 


2 


4,040 


46.9 


1958 


5,612 


27 


3 


1,175 


10 


3 


4,437 


48.5 


1959 


6,127 


28 


4 


1,373 


11 


7 


4,754 


48.4 


1960 


6,932 


30 


2 


1,488 


12 


3 


5,444 


50.4 


1961 


7,446 


30 


2 


1,869 


14 


4 


5,577 


47.9 



118 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 47 — Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools: Counties of Maryland: 1923-1961 



One Teacher Elementary Schools* 



Year Ending 












June 30 


Number of 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


Pupils in One- 


Per Cent of 




One-Teacher 


Total Ele- 


Total Ele- 


Teacher 


Total Ele- 




Schools 


mentary 


mentary 


Schools 


mentary 






Schools 


Teachers 




Pupils 


1923 


1,496 


69.9 


39.6 


t 




1928 


1,206 


65.1 


31.7 


t 




1933 


740 


53.2 


20.3 


t 




1938 


560 


48.1 


15.4 


t 




1943 


275 


31.4 


7.8 


7,546 


"5.8 


1952 


75 


10.9 


1.5 


1,926 


1.2 


1953 


59 


8.7 


1.1 


1,450 


0.9 


1954 


50 


7.5 


0.8 


1,295 


0.7 


1955 


80 


4.5 


0.5 


753 


0.4 


1956 


24 


3.7 


0.3 


595 


0.3 


1957 


23 


3.9 


0.3 


584 


0.3 


1958 


17 


2.1 


0.3 


410 


0.2 


1959 


11 


1.2 


0.1 


278 


0.1 


1960 


12 


1.8 


0.1 


300 


0.1 


1961 


10 


1.3 


0.1 


281 


0.1 




BY LOCAL UNIT, 


1960-1961 






Dorchester 


8 


33.3 


7.1 


228 


6.6 


Somerset 


1 


8.3 


1.1 


20 


0.8 


Talbot 


1 


9.1 


1.1 


33 


1.3 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more, 
t Data unavailable. 



r 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



ABLE 48 — Number of Public Schools: Number of Teachers and Principals: State of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


AU Schools 


AUegany 


Anne Arundel | 


Baltimore City | 


1 Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline | 


Carroll | 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester | 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomery 


Prince George's 


1 Queen Anne's | 


St. Mary's 


1 Somerset | 


Talbot 


Washington | 


Wicomico 


.2 


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 


Vll Schools 


823 


29 


59 


145 


78 


13 


9 


18 


18 


12 


24 


29 


16 


21 


13 


11 


92 


105 


10 


17 


16 


12 


43 


19 


14 


1.0- 1.9 


12 


















8 








1 










1 


1 
3 


1 








2.0-2.9 


33 


1 


1 


1 




3 










2 


■3 


"4 




1 


'2 






i 


3 




6 




1 


3.0-3.9 


43 


2 


1 


2 








1 


2 




6 


3 


3 




1 


4 




'2 


2 


1 


2 


"i 


3 


'3 


3 


4.0-4.9 


31 




4 


1 






"i 




1 












1 


1 




3 




1 


2 


1 


8 


3 


2 


5.0-5.9 


22 


2 


1 


2 




'i 


'2 


1 


i 


'i 




"i 










6 






1 


1 


1 






6.0-6.9 


29 


1 


2 






1 


■3 




3 


2 




1 






"i 


1 


2 


i 


"2 


1 


4 


2 


i 




7.0-7.9 


33 


2 


4 


2 


'i 


1 


1 


'2 


i 


1 






2 








3 


1 


1 


2 




3 


1 


i 


8.0-8.9 


34 


5 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 






1 










4 


4 


1 


i 


1 


9.0-9.9 


37 


2 


3 


4 


4 


'4 


2 


1 


1 






1 








1 


7 






2 




i 


10.0-10.9 


28 


3 


1 






1 




3 


2 
















5 


3 


'i 








1 


'2 




11.0-11.9 

12.0-12.9 


36 
45 


2 
1 


3 
3 


"8 
11 


'3 


"i 




1 
1 


1 
1 








'i 




'i 
1 




'2 


5 
12 


2 


i 




"i 


3 
3 


1 


i 
1 


13.0-13.9 


40 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 




1 








2 






14 


6 








1 


'2 


1 


14.0-14.9 


35 


2 


2 


7 


1 




'i 












'i 






7 


5 




i 




i 


1 


2 






60 




Q 
O 


A 
1 








1 
1 




























1 








16.0-16.9 


29 
28 


1 


4 


5 
























6 


6 




i 




2 






17.0-17.9 


1 


4 


'4 






*2 


















4 


5 




1 






'i 




18.0-18.9 

19.0-19.9 


20 
26 






1 

9 


2 
1 
























6 
7 


6 
7 












1 




20.0-20.9 


19 




2 


5 


2 
























2 


5 
















21.0-21.9 


18 




4 


5 


























2 


2 
















22.0-22.9 


21 




5 


5 


4 
























4 


3 
















23.0-23.9 


23 


i 
1 


5 


4 


4 
























5 


2 
















24.0-24.9 


12 




2 


4 
























2 


















25.0-25.9 


15 






6 


1 
























2 


'2 
















26.0-26.9 


10 






1 


4 
























1 


















27.0-27.9 


15 






6 


4 
























2 


i 
















28.0-28.9 


12 






6 


1 
























1 


2 
















29.0-29.9 


13 






5 


5 
























3 


















30.0-30.9 


12 






9 


1 
























2 


















31.0-31.9 


12 






4 


5 










































32.0-32.9 


11 






3 


6 










































33.0-33.9 


5 






3 


2 










































.34.0-34.9 


6 






2 


3 






































"i 




35.0-and over 


23 






13 


8 























































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS (7-12) 



All Schools 


267 

3 
6 
4 
8 
8 
11 
6 
7 
5 
10 
9 
11 
20 
24 
18 
15 
11 
13 
8 
8 
9 
5 

11 
7 
6 
4 

13 


9 


n 


50 

1 
2 


25 


4 


7 


14 


7 


8 


5 


10 


4 

1 
1 


8 


5 


4 


24 


31 


4 5 


7 
1 


3 


11 


5 




1.0- 2.9 






3.0-4.9 






1 


1 
1 
2 
3 




1 
2 




























5.0-6.9 
















1 
1 










7.0- 8.9 


'3 




1 
1 
1 
4 
4 


i 


2 


1 

'2 
















1 














9.0-10.9 


1 


1 


'i 


1 
1 
1 




















11.0-12.9 








2 










1 










13.0-14.9 




















1 










15.0-16.9 








1 




























2 




17.0-18.9 












1 






1 








1 


1 
1 








1 


19.0-20.9 




1 








1 
1 


2 

i 
1 
1 


'1 


1 








2 


1 

"2 


1 

i 


21.0-22.9 














1 


'2 


1 

i 


*i 

■3 


i 
2 
3 

6 
6 
2 
4 


1 1 


1 

2 
3 
2 






23.0-24.9 


1 

'2 
1 


'2 

"1 
1 
2 
1 


1 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 














"i 




25.0-29.9 


'i 


1 
1 


1 


2 
1 
2 


'2 
1 


1 
2 


2 
2 
1 






30.0-34.9 




"1 
1 
2 


2 
1 








35.0-39.9 










40.0-44.9 


2 
2 










1 




1 






45.0-49.9 






1 














2 




50.0-54.9 










1 






3 
1 
3 
5 
2 












55.0-59.9 
















2 














1 


*i 




60.0-64.9 


1 
4 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
























65.0-69.9 
































70.0-74.9 






























1 
















75.0-79.9 


2 


1 
3 
1 


1 
2 
2 
4 
2 
10 






































80.0-84.9 
























1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


3 
















85.0-89.9 






































90.0-94.9 

95.0-99.9 

100.0 and over 















































































120 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 49 — Number of Public Schools : Average Number Belonging : State of Maryland • 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Average 
Number 
Belonging 











imor 




iline 






alv 


o 




m 


O 


6 











































Si 


JO 












ick 




-a 






omer 


Geor 


Anne 


ry's 






gton 


CO 


Freder 


Garret 


Harfor 


Howar 


Kent 


Montg 


Prince 


Queen 


St. Ma 


Somers 


Talbot 


Washir 


Wicom: 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 



All Schools 


*823 


29 


59 


145 


78 


13 


9 


18 


18 


12 


24 


29 


16 


21 


13 

1 


11 


92 


105 

3 


10 


17 
3 


IC 
2 


12 
J 


43 


1 


1 A 

14 
1 

2 
2 


30 or less 


13 


1 




4 




ly 


31— 60. 


36 
46 


3 


4 














6 


2 


4 


1 


1 


2 




1 

1 
1 
2 


\ 
2 


K 


5 

g 




61— 90 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 




1 


1 




6 


4 


1 


1 


4 


i 




3 


\ 
\ 
2 


3 
3 


91— 120 


25 




1 




2 






1 
2 






2 


2 


"i 


1 


1 




I 
2 


121— 150 


25 


'2 


5 


i 






1 




'2 


'i 

2 




1 








i 
1 
1 
4 


3 


151— 180 


33 


1 


2 


1 




'2 


2 


'2 






"2 


1 








1 


5 


'2 


1 
2 


3 


2 


2 


' j 


181— 210 


34 


2 


1 
6 


2 


'2 


1 


2 


1 


'i 


'2 




2 


2 


2 




1 


3 


5 






3 






211— 240 


38 


5 


2 


2 




1 


2 


1 




2 


1 






2 


4 






3 


j 




241— 270. . . 


31 


3 


2 


2 


1 


'4 


i 


1 


2 


'i 


1 


1 


1 






6 


2 








] 






271— 300 


39 


3 


3 


2 


5 


1 


4 


1 


'i 




2 


1 




i 


4 


8 


'2 




I 




301— 330 


42 


1 


1 


3 


2 






2 


1 


*i 


2 




1 


'3 


7 


9 


1 




1 
2 




2 


'2 


"2 


331 — 360 


35 


1 


2 


6 


2 


1 






2 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 






7 


4 




"i 

1 


2 






361— 390 


48 


1 


3 


8 


2 


1 




"1 




1 


3 


2 


1 






7 


9 


'1 


'i 




4 


'i 

2 


i 


391— 420 


41 


3 


2 


7 




1 


1 


"i 




2 




2 


'3 


'i 


9 


6 


1 






421— 450 


27 




2 


2 


'2 






1 








1 




1 




5 


7 


1 
1 




1 


1 


1 


'2 
1 


451— 480 


26 


'i 


1 


9 


3 




'i 


1 
















3 


5 






481— 510 


25 
23 




1 
2 


2 


2 








1 


1 


1 






1 






4 


7 




1 






3 


1 




511— 540 




4 


3 






1 


1 








1 




i 


5 


4 








1 
1 




541— 570 


27 


"i 


1 


5 


5 




'i 












1 




3 


8 










"i 




571— 600 


24 


1 


2 


7 


4 






1 






2 




i 




3 


2 










1 




601— 660 


42 


11 


11 


3 












1 




i 
1 




9 


6 














661— 720 


27 




3 


10 


3 












1 




i 




4 


4 
















721— 780 


31 




2 


9 


9 






1 


1 


1 






1 


1 




4 


1 












1 




781— 840 


22 






7 


7 












2 




3 


1 














841— 900 


22 






13 


6 










1 








1 






1 
















901— 960 


10 






5 


5 






































961—1020 


9 






7 


2 










































1021—1080 


7 






4 


1 
























1 














1 




1081—1140 


3 






2 


1 






































1141-1200 


6 






3 


2 










































1201 and over 


6 






5 


1 































































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 



All Schools 


*2G7 

2 
12 
9 
9 
13 
7 
5 
12 
10 
8 
21 
14 
26 
8 
15 
9 
11 
4 
11 
6 
7 
5 
8 
3 
8 
8 
2 
2 


9 


13 


50 


25 


4 


7 
1 

'i 
2 


14 


7 


8 


5 


10 


4 


8 


5 


4 


24 


31 


4 


5 


1 


3 


11 


5 


4 




51—100 


'3 

i 

'2 


i 

'i 
2 


3 
1 
2 
3 
3 
2 


1 


2 


1 
3 
1 
2 
1 




3 




'i 

1 
1 


2 
























101— 150 










1 






2 
1 










151— 200 


1 


1 


"i 




















201— 250 








2 














1 
1 


i 
1 

'i 
1 


251— 300 












1 
1 

i 

'1 


1 








301— 350 


















1 
1 














1 


351— 400 






2 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 














1 


1 


2 


1 
2 


'i 
1 
1 


1 


401— 450 


1 
1 
2 
1 
6 






1 


1 


1 






451— 500 














1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


'i 


'i 

'3 

'i 
1 
2 
1 
5 
3 
1 
1 
1 


1 
2 
1 
4 
3 
8 
1 
2 
1 


1 


2 
3 
1 
1 
1 




501— 600 


1 


'2 


1 


2 
■3 


"i 
1 
1 


1 

'2 


2 
1 


i 


'i 
1 
2 


601— 700 


701— 800 










801— 900 


1 
















901—1000 


1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

'2 
1 
1 


















1 




1 


1001—1100 


1 

3 






1 














2 




1101—1200 










1 












1201—1300 




































1301—1400 


1 
3 
1 
3 
4 
1 
2 














1 




/2 




















1401—1500 






























1501—1600 




















1 










1 










2 


1 




1601—1700 


i 
1 


"i 
1 

'2 


1 

'i 

3 
3 
1 
1 






























1701—1800 
























2 
















1801—1900 






































1901—2000 
























1 
1 


1 
1 
















2001—2100 






































2101—2200 


1 
1 






































2201—2300 










































2301—2400 










































2401—2500 


4 

8 






3 
7 


























1 


















2501— and over 


1 



















































































* A total of five seventh grades which are housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high school curriculum (two in Al- 
legany, one each in Dorchester, Howard and Washington) are included in the number of elementary schools but excluded from the number 
of high schools. 



Maryland State Department op Education 



121 



I OS r-l 



■ 05 05 lf5 (N ' 



>.0 t~ -DiOt-OO-^ -OOIO 



I OO 1^ (N --I O 



is 



8 



o ^ « ■ 



• a: 



6 



122 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





(A 

U 


d 



s ^ 

cfi 

i.S 

CD fl 

(fl On 
'd On 

^-^ 

OS 

rH C3 

is 

If 



i C<J O 00 



OO lO OG Oi O 



; iC »C ■ 
I 00 Ttl Cfl < 



uscceo-^co 05 CO 



cc oo " o; < 



oo o oo ^ ( 



T-i ^ (M CO ( 



1~ O CO CO 
^ (M 



, ^ ^ CO (M ' 



I CO CO 



c<i 00 t>- o n< t-. o 
i-^ ioim'»ocoo — ^i--"coo*o 

CO ^ CO CO CO CO * CO ^ ^ 



CD CO O r-; C£5 
— ^ «5 «o' CO 
CO CO <M Tj< 



OC O C<1 
<M us Tfl 



-H QC T*. 00 



00 C<I CO >o t>. 



00 Tt< t~- 05 

00 00 (M 00 05 



•>*< ^ CO CO 05 05 OO 05 05 >« 

>oo>coot^ -^rcot^oo'to 

^ ---H CO ^ ,-1 (M 



xi; to 05 1>; -"i; 
T»< ei co' CO 

<M ^ IM 



CO C<l 



oq «5 — ; O CO 

' OO — ■ -rf coined t 

CO — CO <M CO c 



»- T— (M • 



I «J WJ 

O «C ««0 00 

1 1-1 CO 



O CD CD 1— I .—I CO C<l M CD T— CO CO r-1 CO 



OO IC ^ »« 
iC CD OO 
OO ,-( <N ,-1 ,-H 



5 F 



• J5 O ^J Si 



oj a 

?2 C 



o O c« 

S J« o £ o 
O K W W S 



M 5 ^ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



123 



TABLE 52— Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools bv the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1958-59, 1959-60, 1960-61 



Grade of Certificate 



Total Number of Certificates Issued 

Administration and Supervision 

Administration and Supervision 

High School Supervision 

Elementary Supervision 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Special Subjects 

Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 

Visiting Teacher 

County Librarian 

High School 

Principal 

Academic 

Special 

Vocational 

Junior High School 

Nonpublic 

Elementary 

Principal 

Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education . 

Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 

Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 

Advanced First Grade 

Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 

Emergency Certificates 
Degree 

Administration and Supervision 

High School 

Elementary School 

Nondegree 

Administration and Supervision 

High School 

Elementary School 

Provisional Certificates 

Substitute Teachers' Certificates 

Degree 

Nondegree 



Number of Certificates Issued 



1958-59 



4,200 



26 
497 
418 

62 
153 

37 



43 
612 
67 
79 
1 
22 



30 
659 
761 



30 
324 



158 



1959-60 



,407 



10 



24 
657 
349 

56 
150 

53 



42 
674 
63 
75 

14 



28 
693 
742 



2 
40 

337 

170 



124 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



9i 

"o 



eft 
X 



d m o 

tQ>-l "o 



S 2 



a 



I- 



S Si 



O • ro (M cc 
r-' ' O M ^ ^ 



• (Ml/5 -O C ■ CO • f • OC 



l»-H -IC-^ .(M CO ■^T-l 



N «0 Tf< 00 
CO CO 50 T-< 



O CO CO >c 
O CO Cfl «o 



• ooeot^ •»*<■,-. •■^co (M 

•^>0<M O <M coco — (M CO 



• t^io CO ^ 05 »- CO o o; o; CD ko 

no CO CD 



CD c<i o CO 



100-^CDCO NtCOOll 



' o; c CO o; CO I 



UO T-. ^ ■ 



t~ cr. Lf5 O 

■i— I O »0 CO '— 1 



• t^ocooo 

' C5 T-<' 



O <M lO CO 
CO CO iC ^ 



<N (M O (M 



(M O U5 CD 
^ O ^ 



I -(MOIMC^ O (M — C; . 



05 CO • CO <M 



(M l« 00 C<1 00 



00 <M »« tr^ 
t- CO -<1" M 
CO CO CO 



O lO (M O CO 

CO (M <n uo 

(M (M <M <M C>a 



CO ^ CO CO < 



oo o: 00 »C 



ifj CO O CO 



•.— TfH CO o o> 
— »0 CO ■<*< 



' CO »0 O: O COOSOO 



CO i-H 

O 05 CO 



I O CO 



OO C5 CO O CO < 



— ^ Cfl CD 

— o; (m' -h' o 



oc CO (M 



I CO o> 

CO (M CD 



c<i C5 

oO CD Ci C: 



CO ^ «^ <M ^ 



— c>q >o CD oc I 



•Oioct^t^ T-. — occMO ■«*<co -t^i-H •^oocsieo 

'»0<MO-^ (N— ' — coo ^T-> '>0— ^OO— < 



»C IC O CD Oi M 



■ <MTt< CO<M<MC— l-OlOC 



CO 00 O l« CD 



.<M'*<0 <M O C\l COOt^COlC C5COOCIM 

T- CD J- «5 OC^OOM 



CO — 00 »0 CO 
CD CO CO I~ 



-r-H-Jco-^o c »o >o o; CO c» (N (M lO c<i co-^fTfea 



i»/5t-CD CDCDCD»«t^ 



r- CD OC CD CD t~ 



■ ■^cooo ooocoict- 
I o o (M — 

"co ci 



it^OCCOt~ CDOflCD-H 
_ JO — iC-^ 01^C5t~ 
--■<*< — O O 1 1 — ■'J' C^J ^ 



■>*< O 05. 
CO CO ( 



OC CO «5 CO 



' — CM C^l Tf< IC CD CO 



IC lO — ' »C t~ Ifl 05 (M 



I CO <M CO ! 



'inti* c CO CO 



-Ob 



s s s 



i i - 



2 



CO S ^ 



b£ 5 S 

jllp 



^ ^<f)paMO ooooQ feowww SphC^^ e-^^^ 



CJ O O CO — CO 

-o ^r; >o 

tn K 



• — 00 >0 '-^ CO 



O M 



>> 2 b 



I 



^ ^-tS o (i. s 

«^ = — ^ § S Si^ 



Maryland State Department of Education 



125 



Si ^ 

so 



2 2" 



(^5 



^6 



• «5 N C • c: IM 

o -<»• e<i c — (M 



CO CO O oo o 



«o t— ^ oc 



O <o 

C <D »0 < 
C t- C3C ( 



C3C 00 — »0 ' 



1 — O <M C^l tM 05 



CO I c--<MO occooceoca 



■o«« 

O CO 



■ 1-1 (Ml 



CO o; CO o: 
1 — >c oc 



• O 00 o 

■ o d 



(M lO< 



OC (M <M <M (M 



<M — c; oc o 
cc o; (M CO 1 



CO o -co 

tC 1^ CO 



: — CO O -"f 



t- ICOCOCOCO C C! O 1" (MOSt^O^ „ o >— • 
UO t^tOOiOOO U0>O(M — — -^dosiMt- OO' 

ooocooci - ■ ■ 



: 1- cr. t^o50C!Ouo ococt^iot 



OS — t~ 

eot-t^co 

C5 50 OS C5 



o; -ti CO CO o 00 

OS M 00 

CO — IM (M 



lO CD lO CO O OS OC 

«N iocs»oo 



■ OS CO CD CO 

lO OC CD 00 00 



— — <M 



IM OS 00 CD — . 



• O O N CO 
CO OC N 



■ O CO CO 
' OS CD (M 



OC 00 • iC CO 

d ^ 'cD-"*- 



• CO CD CM 
— CM 



•CO — OCM 



• UO— -TT . 1 



■ CD CO CO CO 
CM — OS 



•t^ CO 



<M O t ^ CM — lO 
C CO OS C CD 



CM o • e<i 

CO CM CM 



ie<iO-^-^ csosr^'^cD >c o CM — c^icooco occoos— ■ 
)<OTf<<NOs OC — CO — c>cr-oceo t-CM — '♦'cm coco — os 

■ oo t - I - I - I ^ OC CC OCOSOCCDl^ 1 - OC OC OC OSt^OSOC 



lO OCO'^t^'^ O'J'OSM^OS icosos'^os -^f — t^i^cs O Uit 

CM COC<«COOCCO COCDiOCO— C. — CMlfl— OCO— tC— COUJUO-* 

tn ciuiui — >c CO 



— < CM O — . -ft" t- CO • 



OC I- OS- CCM — 



■ oocoocr^ — eooo — co ooot^ 



CM — — 



•20 
2 £ £ 

3 Hill 

CQ ^ a cs d as 



OOOQQ 



: 

— Ci g 



Jii 



« CJ c _^ 



126 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



O M 



'oo 



CO • to 1-1 



eo>ci--e<ieo •«ti<M"550>0 oeceoor^ o-nioe 



I <M CO 05 O C<5 • 



OC »« lO CO 



Oi CO oo o O 

o o o c<i ^ 



o o 



lO • CO CO • CO IM 

^ "do ' do 



O bC 



C<» COOOlOOSC^ COOOOlOTti COC<I>OCOCO ^>CtO(MeO >0C005CT> 
t>- CO "5 eO00lO00C<l »C00O'^03 •rt(MC<IO<M mCCt^Oi 



O lO O COOr-CO(M 

oo 010-^COC<I iftC^lt^t^O 

ira t ~ CO CO •.j< CO CO 



>C0'^t-iO T-ir»<(Ml-00 (MiCIMiO 



<u 



• r-H . (M IC 



lO O 05 oo T-H 



Tf O CO OC <M 
lO CO <M 



l(MO (M OC — ■>*< COOCOO 



CO OO (M IC OS 



»o eoc^i cO'^ (M 



— < CO »0 OV OC' ■ 



t^CO ■ OCCOCOlCM< >C l~ <M 



>eo— '•'fo CO— loo^^o c<i lo t 



< CO 'C <M CO CO « 



W5 O <M CO 00 CO £ 



CO Pvl ifj O CO CO o 



OCOCONCO COOOlMCOlO I>. oo Tt< 05 -r-TttCOC^J 
05 C<1 O »0 ^ OS Tf< CO r- »0 00 00 (M 00 OS 00 — < 

<M e<i CO CO ■>*' i^ co (M >-< 



l^-^ll llJi^ fsg^s |:Hie 

issJi I^IIJ l-giSi III! 

OOOOQ p^UWWW SPmCmcC H^^^ 



B o c 



Maryland State Department of Education 



127 



o o o 



■ to O CO • cvi »o 

■ o o -H ^ cod 



O • CO • ■ CO CO • oo 

^ o ' o o o 



• lO-M-^ CO 

o o — 



"—CO • 



O M 



1— I iOt^-^t^ • OOOt^-^' 

esi -^eoco*- — (M ■ 



so -icot^ iM Oi -(nco • — t^o> 
^ ■^•^c^ o— Mco 'i-I^o 



O C5CO — t^>0 -tiOOJl^. 
CO lOCOCC0Ct~ — OO'^O! 



(M O uo CO O (M CO eo 05 lO oO co 
ooi^'-— — o — O coooc>-- 



O <M Cvl OC <M OCD l-Cq O^lCeO • ICC<I -CO • C^OOlOtO 
^ ^ ^ O — O CO N — — — O— O O O <M 



C<l OC CO ++ — 

o ' o o 



• CO • CO • ++C<I -OOM CO 
7-h' o'''-h" o'om 'o'-h 



O COCOOtDl- OCD05000 IOC5C5-—CO CCl^C0t^«O 1~ O «0 

oipopr^po to.^^ira»rt ^^ccocc^co C9r»'???'Tjgg ^J'^^^ 



it^oooot^ oc'cor^i-i- oc 1^ oo oo CO oot^ociooc oc oo oo oo 



• lO O 00 ^ • u? -C^ CO 



O M 



— < OOPQOOSIM — OC0050 — tO»Ct--00 O CO O oo 00 ^COOCO 

— oooott-h ^co-<»<imoj co»->c>i»-< 



) ^ U5 <M • 00 «0 • . 



05 



<o CO e<j I-H 



' (M • .H (N 



J— C<1 CO CO 



I'^co lost^eoco t^oooscsco m oc Tf< its- 



CO <M Tji M CO 



»C CO 



COC<l»OTt<0 »OC5»rt>/5'^ •t'OlO^CO ■^O5'^00C>^ — C<1 >o 

COOOCOC^OO OC^OO^IM OOSCOlOl^ — COOC^OJ OCCOOO--H 

or- " I ^ CO CO'- »oeo ^ co<— ii— > 



— O) <u 



a> O B 

sir-- 

-'.CI, 



:2 ci !r 



s 



128 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 57 



Status of Certification of New Elementary School Teachers (1-6) : 
Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



Local Unit 


Total 


Regular 


Other 


Aides 


No 
Certi- 
ficate* 


B.S. 


Jr. 
H.S. 


H.S. 


Emergency 


Substitute 


Degree 


No 
Degree 


No 
Degree 


Total State: Numberf . 


2,265 


913 


5 


15 


884 


341 


21 


10 


76 


PerCent . . 


100.0 


40.3 


0.2 


0.7 


39.0 


15.0 


0.9 


0.4 


3.5 


Allegany 


20 


18 






2 










Anne Arundel .... 


205 


55 






85 


54 






'7 


Baltimore City J. . 


422 


161 






141 


109 




'8 


3 


Baltimore 


397 


220 






108 


51 






12 


Calvert 


25 


15 




"i 


5 


4 








Caroline 


18 


8 






10 










Carroll 


39 


5 




3 


10 


i8 






i 


Cecil 


39 


12 






11 


11 






3 


Charles 


26 


13 






11 


2 








Dorchester 


9 


7 






1 


1 








Frederick 


69 


27 




1 


27 


13 






1 


Garrett 


11 


4 






3 


1 








Harford 


76 


44 




i 


27 


4 










45 


11 






20 


14 








Kent 


15 


5 






6 


4 








Montgomery 


467 


196 


1 


3 


233 


8 




1 


25 


Prince George's. . 


402 


126 




5 


194 


52 




1 


21 


Queen Anne's .... 


8 


7 






1 










St. Mary's 


45 


10 






17 


12 






'2 


Somerset 


12 


7 






4 


1 








Talbot 


18 


6 




1 


10 


1 








Washington 


31 


16 


i 




6 


7 






i 


Wicomico 


38 


28 






7 


1 






2 




20 


12 






7 


1 


( ; ; 







* "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time making certification impractical, 
t Total State figures exclude transfers between local units. 

X "Elected" and "probationary" teachers are included under regular certificates, special substitutes 
under "other". 



Maryland State Department of Education 



129 



TABLE 58 



Status of Certification of New High School Teachers (7-12) : 
Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



Local Unit 


Total 


Regular 


Elementary 
BS 


Other 


No. 
Certi- 
ficate* 


HA 
HS 
Voc 


Jr. 
H.S. 


Emergency 


Substitute 


Degree 


No 
Degree 


Degree 


No 
Degree 


Total State: Number! • 


2,227 


1,166 


151 


21 


724 


66 


10 


26 


63 


Per Cent . 


100.0 


52.4 


6.8 


0.9 


32.5 


3.0 


0.4 


1.2 


2.8 


Allegany 


25 


7 


11 


1 


5 








1 


Anne Arundel .... 


248 


132 


8 


3 


83 


9 


5 


2 


6 


Baltimore City J . . 


400 


213 




2 


148 


29 




8 




Baltimore 


392 


222 


63 


6 


80 


8 




7 


6 


Calvert 


23 


11 




2 


7 


1 




1 


1 


Caroline 


24 


13 


2 


1 


7 




1 






Carroll 


59 


23 


2 




27 


'4 




' 1 


'2 


Cecil 


47 


20 






21 






1 


2 




25 


10 






13 


2 








Dorchester 


18 


8 


i 




9 










Frederick 


61 


29 


16 




13 


2 


1 






Garrett 


11 


2 


1 




8 










Harford 


87 


53 


8 




19 


2 




1 


4 


Howard 


41 


22 




1 


14 


3 






1 


Kent 


14 


9 






4 


1 








Montgomery 


368 


216 


5 


4 


115 


1 






27 


Prince George's , 


367 


196 


29 


4 


116 


8 


2 


2 


10 


Queen Anne's ... 


15 


11 






4 










St. Mary's 


35 


15 


1 




18 




1 






Somerset 


14 


3 


3 




7 


1 








Talbot 


16 


6 


1 




9 










Washington 


50 


24 


3 




19 






2 




Wicomico 


34 


20 


2 


1 


9 










Worcester 


33 


19 


4 




9 






1 





* "No certificate" includes teachers who stayed in service a short time making certification impractical, 
t Total State figures exclude transfers between local units. 

t "Elected" and "probationary" teachers are included under regular certificates, special substitutes 
under "other". 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



00 OJOOO-^tOS VOMC^OOOi 



' 00 t- O -tj- . 



M « ^ CO ec 



•»J< 'Sl' 00 O rf OSCJOM 
OOlO t-H 



Tt t- 00 ifl 



© 5£> -tj< 

»-i ec t- o 

t-i CO N W 



CO rH ec o ec 

O O N in CC 



N ecooio-^t- t-i-iSi«oo 
« oOTi<o<Cec ooiNccooco 



ec 05 



ec t- Tt t- 



t- CD ec ■ 

OiOO-*T 



«o ecooosos-^ t-i«t-«o;o «Oi-ir-(Oit- ©o-tNt- t- 

00 lO Oi (N r-(»CMMi-l Oi t-I »-( « r-l ■•f O N ^ N »-l M 

11 N «C l« »-l Tj" in 



CO 00'S'«mO 
00 CO O t— I— t 00 



t-NN'tOl Ost-OOt-rH 

co<j50Ji«io ooeooiooo 



n<-«i«05O'<i< eo(NCDco- 

,-1 T}"^ 



CO CO 00 N -^inost-r-i i-it-0'»i< 
in t-r-i.-i (NrHt-Hwi i-c^eow 

NCO 



00 ©incot-Tf eccc©t-© oiTj<t-ir-im cvicoeom-^ -<*©cot- 

01 ecmt-N-H ©©T-iTtoo rHt-,-iMai t-w-ieo-^ t>-*t-!7i 



-rj" ai 05 CO 00 
eooor-ico 

NCO 



»-( oom«OTi<io inuo.-(c-tr- oc oo oot-«in^ lomoot- 
© eot-ioiot- 05mo5 05 ec im oo ^ comco-^oo c--^05« 
.-I «e«Oi-icoi-t i-HTfccNCJ eo^cew-i moo>-iNih r-it-ecN 



sat £= ^sg •ci^'S'H 

=:c«9c4c« saesSjao £ eu « o a; 

<;-j;nfqo ooooQ feOWWfc^ 



§1 

Si; 



3 *i 



I 



■^81 

sis 



Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



21 

5 ^ 
'I 

u 



8 



a « 



o N o 00 

OS lO T}" rH 



SNN^-"!" ©-.-"fOWvO XjCNt--* ^«N'<1< 
■( l« C£> Tf lO (N t> in .-I Cvl 00 M IM eC C5 U5 « 



4C cj;oti< 



«o o o 00 a> 



Ol O ^ l-H . 



W O tc 



ec r-t N X ec 



5© (55 CO Oi -"if !CO«e<J'l< OOlOlOTf 
CC«t-Ot- iOTtlOm'>J< Xr-l»Nl/5 



t- «C ■<4< 1-1 



«o t- 05 ;o « 



t-teoirHin ;oiflt-05Tj< ^^^©t- -^mccotj" -^tXTrN 



CO 05C^05'-i M< 

O 



ooxMecic 
eo C5 -I 



^1 



22- 



B B 



is 



5 S-S^Hi 



I tg C9 01 a) J3 o 



OP 0) o ca ■ 



S! ^ w . 

ic< be 

Ml c a £ 



6fi « 



132 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



CO «0 O O O rH O CO O O t~ t- CO CD IN CO t- O lO t 



00 05 M O O 00 

00 ec(Mi-ioi 

05 T-l T-l 0> iH 



t-cor^-^io yrco-^-^oj oiooict-oi tCrHyjsoo ooo-.-^oo 
t-iooit-N eoire-^iocc t^cJtocO'-^ ccoot^inco i-ioO'^o<i 

^ 50 CO IM 



O 00 O lO 00 



I X l-O IN 00 rH ■ 



m o eo in 00 c- 



cri CO CO CO m 

O OS r-t CO 

^ IN 



lo ;ccDO^t- !£otr-t-co ^o^DiNt- ooioosiON CTiioeoco 
CO ^-^oiooo oo-^ojost- coot-ineo -rt<oot:-eoio rHo^jt^ 



a; CO ^ I 

CO ^ CC OS 
^ <N 



05 (N 00 o: 



CO in 

(N IC rH i-H rH 

WIN 



oi-HcoiNt- <c->*oioec oscc^eoo a: ooco-*-^ noosn 
coiNt>cooo t-rfcoicc- oitocoo;^ coo-^Tfin t>xa>N 



ecm-'i'oot- oocO'# - 

tH 05 ^ IN CO (N CO 

IN IN 



CO -t .-I o ^ 1-1 



eooiNioin eOTHTi<iceo (N00rH(Neo 



O rH CO rH ■ 

00 lO T}< ;o • 



t- CO rH eo 

OlOt-rH 



rHTi<iNeoo iftocooo- 

rH?O-<j«e0rH r-ieO(N 
rH IN IN 



I O OS rH t- (N < 
'IN IN O rH - 

rH (N 



CDOJift-^O ICOilCiO-^ rtOlOrHCO rH 05 00 N ,-H N in 

eoooeoiNoo onoo-^in ooicomc- rHcooOrHos oo«ooOi-i 



3 £ 

o o . 

s s 



o) a) o rt 



o c 



Mo, g =S 2 

1^ 3 4H O 



ills 



Maryland State Department of Eoucation 



133 



OS ^ t- 00 ooiD Oir-ixn in ■■•fasas 



t- rj" (N N 5£) 
!£> to C~ ;0 



DO CO 00 t-^ 

eci N e<5 1-H 



00 «£> ^ O N 
000 50 •'4't- 



a: 00 • lO 
o 1^ 00 00 



^ a-, c- ec 

to 05 05 ^ 



CO ec Cr- CO 



■ t- lO (N X 50 



?DiOCDeOtD eO i-t t- «£> 1-H ?D , 

»OrH(NO>->i< -«i< t- t- t> tOM' 



I ,-1 rH (N . 



OOCO 00 -"t m '^<£> 

T-l rH O 00 



« 05 00 05 tC 



a: ^ 05 irt CO 



I i-< <J5 OS 05 t- 05 U5 C^CCt-W 



on 

S3 



o eo ec ec >o 

O O: O N 



00 W ^ 05 t- 

Tf o: irt 



N 05 CO ^ 



»H 05 in rH 

lO o: N in 



05 (N(M005«D <N^-<feOO (MtDCCOOiO tXNOSlO'* 



ift 05 ec ^ 
in 5£> o 05 



i'go : : 

tills 



01 IV O A 



mo5«ot- co-HCQcc 
ec;o(NW(N eoooc-ic 

00 



134 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



O Ol P5 W5 



•t> CO o 

as 



1-1 r-^r^r-((N 



O 00 ?C t- O 05 t- 



IT-IOOO 



O 05 O 



r-1 1-1 M M 



g a> 0) 



0) <D O CS 

C £i 5 es o a; 



<<PQP2U UOUUQ fcCWWW SiXO't: 



^81 

^ o w 



2s 



CO >7 

li 



Maryland State Department of Education- 



IBS 



• T I- X t- ~: c X 



eg M wo 



•ooo 

V> 00 



O N o ^ 
00 m i« «c t- 



00 Si O X Ifti-Ht-t-W 00 M • t- O 

o ^ 00 M irt> rH o; lO o-. N «D mo 



■OON 
?0 CC "5 



Ift t> -rf (N . 



OrHifloso NC-ecoto oowmioec oo> -ect- t-ooOi-< 



3 
ft 

'3 

•r" <— I 



Si 

-? 



Tj< t»©00-< w 
«0 N CO W 



o«»ftP5N e<5t-tj<o«D oceot-o oscawMt- o©. 



1 c- to ;o rH ec M <-! 



lOOOONCO 
(NTfOOVC^ 
N TT CC 



to ^ 

0; C 

=s c 



c — 

^ o. 



;5 



S n a o 0) 



eclfl'-'Ori' o>/noce 



136 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 65 — Number and Per Cent of Teachers Who Withdrew from Maryland 
Public Schools: Summer 1960 and School Year, 1960-61 



Local Unit 


Total 


Elementary (1-6) 


High (7-12) 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State* 


o,515 


14 


6 


1,881 


14 


9 


1 CO A 


14 


2 


Allegany 


55 


8 


6 


31 


10 


3 


24 


7 


1 


Anne Arundel 


345 


20 


6 


169 


18 


9 


176 


22 


5 


Baltimore City 


687 


11 


1 


306 


9 


5 


381 


13 





Baltimore 


558 


15 


3 


330 


17 


1 


228 


13 


2 


Calvert 


38 


21 


7 


20 


21 


1 


18 


22 


5 


Caroline 


41 


21 





17 


18 


9 


24 


22 


9 


Carroll 


93 


20 


4 


41 


18 


1 


52 


22 


7 


Cecil 


69 


17 


6 


31 


15 





38 


20 


5 


Charles 


46 


15 


5 


25 


16 


4 


21 


14 


5 


Dorchester 


27 


11 


4 


11 


9 


7 


16 


12 


9 


Frederick 


103 


16 


4 


53 


16 


4 


50 


16 


4 


Garrett 


24 


12 


8 


13 


13 


3 


11 


12 


2 


Harford 


124 


18 


3 


65 


19 





59 


17 


6 


Howard 


65 


20 


7 


40 


24 


5 


25 


16 


5 


Kent 


29 


19 


6 


15 


20 





14 


19 


2 


Montgomery 


493 


15 


1 


309 


17 


6 


184 


12 


2 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


559 


19 


6 


328 


22 





231 


16 


9 


20 


11 


9 


6 


7 


1 


14 


16 


7 




70 


28 


6 


46 


36 


2 


24 


20 


3 


Somerset 


27 


14 


9 


11 


12 


3 


16 


17 


4 


Talbot 


35 


20 





18 


19 


8 


17 


20 


2 


Washington 


79 


10 


6 


35 


9 


1 


44 


12 


2 


Wicomico 


60 


15 


1 


33 


15 


3 


27 


14 


8 




51 


21 


5 


20 


16 


4 


31 


26 


9 



* Transfers between units are excluded from State total. 



1 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



1 

(/} 

3 
X 

fi 

.2 

fa 

r 



u 

I 

3 

1 



o 










>n C^l — ■ n 


>«■ ir: c^j oi 




Lkave of Absi 


JO ssaujij iOJ 


1 ~ 


C5 — >« «2 


• CM • • • 


e<i •c<i • 


»0 lO • ■ ^ 
CM • ■ 


. CO -H 








•CM — < • - 


»H -e* -CM 


CM ... 






iiMOunuQ sasnBQ 
JO suosnay J^MIO 




>o ec o 


CO CM ^ 


-<»• — CM CM — 


CO — — • • 


•CO »o 




auiijoBox 
qjiA paysijBssiQ 


rt 


■ »C >C <M 


— CM — 


: : 




• — CM • 




SS3U11X IBU0SJ3J 




■ (M C<5 — CO 
• CM M 


• CM • — < • 


CM • iC • 


O CO — CO ■ 


CO • — — H 


Q 

a 
z 






oc 1^ 


• 1 - lO CM ■ 


>0 CM O O CO 


CO CM 


• oc— — 


2 

» 


ii:jlUJ8;BJ^ 


o 


• O 50 »-l 

• •<»i cc 


^ t- CO CO 


CO — — — . 
— -CM — 


— -9" CM OC — . 

— 05 


• I- CM 




paujBj^ 


c 


■ 3C — CM 


■ lO — ■ — 




^ CM ^ 


; :-- 






to 
«o 


C5 «0 lO 
O CO o 


O CO "5 »<5 "5 
CM — 


C5 • CO CO "5 
■ CM ^ 


t-- — O 
1^ — CM 


iC CO ■ 
CM — • 




Xpn^g ox 




r- ^ »0 CM 

CM CM CM 


: : 


«0 • CM CO 


CM CM CO — 


CM CM CO C^l 




CM 


— C<5 CO CO • 






•<*< CM • • • 


: : : 


SuiqoBax uBqx Joq^Q ^JOAi 


»o 


• lO l~ • 




i« CM i« CM • 


o o — — — 
CO 


^ CO "5 CM 


« 

B 


UOlJISOjJ 

XjosiAjadng m jo 
siooqog oi^qnduoii^' tij 


(M 
•O 


•^C CO O C«5 • 










2 
w 

o 
z 


iij^anoQ JO 


3C 


•lO CO CO CO 


»0 «^ CM iC CM 


OC TJ" CM CO 


— CM X CO 
CO CM 


CM iC lO 


s 
o 

r- 


%\u[i [■eoo'j 
puti.OBi^j jamouy uj 


cc 


CM CC CO CO t~ 
— CO 


CO l - CM 


— lO — C^l -M 




co__.o 


paddojQ 


oc 

CO 
CM 


C5 — CO 05 
^ CO — 


CM »f5 t— CO t-- 


I- ■ O CM • 


lO — CM iC CM 
CO 


t - lO 00 






CO — OC — 


i-O >-o — 


CM l~ CM ■ 


c-1 — CM m • 


CO oc -a- CO 






— CM CM • ■ 
CM ■ ■ 


• • — 


: : : 


>o C^l • — H • 


• Its ■ —t 




♦ 


\rs >o 1 QC OC 
»f5 OC CO 
CO o «ft 


— CO c; CO 1- 

~ — CM 


C CM ^ -5 ?j 


«C CM CM 


IC ~ ~ — 




H 

y. 


i 

v: 
'2 


••>>■• 

^ 4) . _ . _ ^ 

a 

=2 = :S :^ 

< < :i X w 


= - \-r.% 


i- i/ S ."! ■ 


■ y> '■ 

>> « 4- ■ 
i O = •/: 

ti£ 1) - .-i 2 

Hd 


: 1 o- -r" 

jJJI 



138 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



o -ti « c 




o « 

C72 





ents 
;her 


CO 




Resid 
ofOt 


Stal 


erienced 


Residents 
of 


Maryland 


Inexp 




Per Cent 






1 


Tot 


Number 




CC t— l> 
W CC CC CO CC CO 



O a: OS «C «£> N 
COOlOlOOlO 
Tl< irt rj< CO CO 



.-H t- »/5 M 

— I oi eg ov ^ 

>f5 T}< in 1(3 1(3 



o o lo a> <o t> 

eg 00 -"t OS CO (M 
00 00 t— o 



t-eoeoo«DTi< 

CO ^ ^ ^ ^ 



-H CO CO 00 00 00 
rH OlCq O^CO^CO^^ 
0i"c<rNiM''(M''cg 



t- 03 «£> U3 OJ l« 
00 eg OJ t- 00 
CO t- «0 00 o 



05 <3> 00 C- CO 
MOi-IOTt03 
OCOm'^TfCO 



oo«5t-ose«o> 



«0 CO 1^5 CO 0» 00 
i-H CO rH lO rH t- 

i-Tegegcacgcg 



r-i U5 00 CO eg 

00 O l« LO o 

ocgegcgeoco 



r-i u5 1- 1> in eg 
coeac-ocooi 

in 05 o O 



I Tj< Cfl lO OS 

'.Ht>cgo50 

0> rl -"S* t> i-< 



«0t>00 0iO' 

in lo US U5 o ?o 

>A i>- 00 < 
in in w m > 

Oi o> 



T-i «o 00 t> eg 

CO Tt 00 00 O 05 
-1 r-( r-l (N T-H 



J- eg in eg in eg 

^ Oi t= o «^ 



ec CO eg T}< eg in 
00 Oi o o t> o 
eg eg CO CO CO CO 



t- Tj< in 00 CO 

CO rH 00 in CO in 
■<t ■>4« m 



«0 O t- Tf Oi 

t- T-H ,-1 eg in CO 
i-i eg eg eg eg eg 



cocD05cg«oeg 



^ o> oi 05 eg 

CDOrtoOOSCO 

1-1 w eg »-( eg CO 



Tj< O .-I ^ I 

O O O t> r)< , 
CO CO CO CO CO ' 



in in in eo CO 

OOi-HOOOO^ 

in o o: X c~ t~ 



eot-05 05«oin 



05 Oi in in in 
oooooc-cgeg 
X o eg i-H th .H 



X CO in o CO 

Oi Ol 00 ^ 05 03 
Tf CO CO CO CO 



C7J eg CO xte in 
i-H in CO t> »-H CO 
05^i-j^eg__i-<eg_^eg_ 
^''oi'eg''eg'"eg'"cg'" 



X eg CO 1-1 1-1 1- 
coc-inoojx 
coco o t^o xn 
oToi-rT-Tcgeg'" 



CO t- X Oi o i-< 

in in in in CO CO 

in ci t> 0(5 Oi o 
in in in in in CD 

C"^ ^ ^ O'^ 



XT-4OJOC0© 

cooxincDx 
th eg th 1-1 iH 1-1 



in t- 1-1 o 
OS 1-1 1-1 in 05 1- 
1-1 eg eg iH iH 1-1 



eg X in 1-1 o t- 
^ OS eg eg o 
.H eg t-i eg eg eg 



CO to o in X 1-1 

X CO CO CD t- 
CO CO CO CO ^ ^ 



CO CTi 1-1 rH X CO 

o eg eg X o o 
eg eg eg i-t eg eg 



in eg in in CD X 



CO O O 1-1 t- •>* 
incoosoxin 

05 O OS OS o o 



CO in CO iH CO 
X in OS t- CO o 

CO CO CO-* CD CD 



OS o 
■"tx^ocox 
Tf in CO CO CD CO 



inxininrfcg 



t- o X in CO 
eg T}< ii t- OS in 
X OS o o eg CO 



coojTfXTfco 

X O X o 
in in in CO OS X 



eg CO 1-1 OS OS t~ 
»Ho,-iegiHeg 
co_t-^x^oocg^eg__ 
rHi-TiH i-Tcg^eg* 



CO eg CD Tj< X Ti< 
OS 1-1 eg o 1-1 
in i-H t> t> in 

t- X OS OS O iH 



cot-xoso-^ 
in in in in CO CO 

incot^oo Jsi 
in in in in in CO 

OS OS OS OS OS OS 



Maryland State Department of Education 



139 







t Taught 
o 1959-60 


In Other 
State 




^ 00 <M «£> Tjt 


OOt-OOvO-H 


00 •<x>a)ia 


oco -cow 
ooo -.-1 


CO CO CO ^ 








•a 


















Who ] 
Previoi 


In 
Marylar 




00 t- rH «0 U? 
>0 i-H t~ 




05 «c «o lo 


ININ^OO W 

»o CO 


t-M'NlO 
























enced 


Who Taught in 
1959-60* 


In Oth« 
States 


1,027 


M (N 00 liO 

t> 00 -< — 1 


t>oas«CTi< 


■<1< t><D Tf 
IM CO M 


kOCO in 
INt~ .-H 
CO y-l 


CO 0> 00 o 




Experi 


In 

Maryland 




00 «0 OS C<J lO 
(N«£IOO 


T»<Oit>00T)< 


(N(Nt-00Tl< 


oo-^Mcoeo 


CO t> --I OS 


:hers 










00 rji rj< U5 T)< 
t> O OS o 


--(Ot-t>0 

00 t> Tj* 

m -^jt eo 


00 CO t> W 
■^CO-'l'iCCD 


OS as ^ cc N 

00 O 1—1 OS 


55.9 
53.1 
61.1 
52.8 


<: 








as 


CO Tf CO irt CO 


a 
H 




tal 
















OF 




To 


t-l 

Qi 














a 

U 






iO 

00 


IN 00 <N '-^ (N 

r-l CC CC 


■^t>r-ieco 

IM CO --I 


CO 00 «e (3^00 

CO t- T-l 


lO00t-»-l00 

t> CO -tr -( 

lO CO 


OS CO "<t 00 

,-1 Tt 


OS 






e 

3 


m 




Soi 








(N 




































c 




00 


(MN'f Olr-I 

[- T-l tH 


OS O CO T}< iX> 

r-l W ^ 


CO CO lO CO eo 


t> N O O tH 
jHrHIN 


CO t~ o t~ 










o 














to 


















rienced 


c 

a; 
■V 
'm 

0) 


of 

Marylar 


1,393 


t- 00 00 00 

— 1 a: 00 IM 


(35 2 ^ 


^ 00 N i-< 00 

CO IM 


CO a; CO o-.' t- 
ocoo ^ 


CO —1 00 00 

^ IN ^ 




Inexpe 






















Per 
Cent 


C5 

o 

U5 


N «0 tCiC !£> 

OS o o o 


Ol C CO CO o 
d W U5 CO 

i«ioeo «o 


o ID Tf c a: 

^ CO CO CO tr- 
io CO lO eo 


CO X 
■-^ oj OS 00 o 

CO lO CO CO 


-1 o: a-. C<I 
CO 00 

•<t r}" CO 






To 






















1 
S 


00 

t- 


sr. o « t- OS 

^ t>(J5 t- ^ 

M 


W ^ lOOOt- 
rH Irt ■<1< t-< 


t- t> t- i-H 

CO rH 00 eo »-i 


o^coasoo 

CO Oi-I CO 


>o 00 X in 

-^COC^(N 








Nui 












Increase 
1 in 
No. of 


hing 
ions 
»ber 


XI 


o 


to T}< 00 CO 


00 CJ5 IX) .-I ec 


N t- CO • 

CO 1 -^(N • 


« t> t- ^ 


^ M-iCO 




Teac; 
Posit 
Octc 
tc 


Octc 


eo 








1 1 1 




Local 
Unit 




iber 


(M 
-1— 


irteocjosoo 
u? 00 -"S* 

T)< « t> 


(N 00 «£> ^ t- 
a> 00 lO N 


oiM cocoas 

CO CD 00 IN 


looseooco 

COCONOON 
00 t> 


IN CO 
CO W C- lO 






Nurr 



> 3 



gen 



Si ^ 



3 gslll si-sl 

<J-iJCQ«U OUUUQ fcOWt^'^ 



lex bt5 



o 

C*3 B3 



140 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 






•H so 

so ^ 



«5 

2iQ 







t Taught 
:o 1959-60 


In Other 
States 






Las 

)US 1 


pui 






Who 
Previc 


In 
Maryla 












ienced 




O 5 




Exper 


Eh in 


In 

Maryland 


Teachers 




tal 


Per 
Cent 


Source of 




To 


Number 






CO 








Resider 
of 


Othei 
State; 




rienced 


Residents i 


of 

Maryland 




Inexpei 








tal 








To 


Number 


Increase 

in 
No. of 


Teaching 
Positions 
October 

to 


October 


New 

TO 


Local 
Unit 


Number 




H 






S 






Local 





CD i-H Ti< in CO 00 



o t- 1> eo o 

O rH -H 05 O 

CO in Tt -^t CO 



00 T)< 00 lO "^J" CDTl<eONO C^t-OCOt- N^HMO 



^ ^ (M r-H r-i r-l 

ec CO 



INCO(NiOCO TfCDt-OOO OOeCOTfcO 0005000 



00 cr. CO ic o I 

3^ (N — . 
(M CO 



ic eo o 



00 CO m -rf 

I CO CO 



sc 00 05 



CO T}> t> 

I I 



. c 

CO SJ 

o 



o> 



oiocot>m 00O5O5COO5 oi^comm i>c<JMmco ooi-hxo 
C0OC005C0 --leceoco corHt--*,-! coo -^r-* ^ececco 
CO Tfec 



>.2 



o o 

s s 



r fcT 0) 

S o c 
c li c 

§o<u 



Irt c5s3a;J=o Siflrtoo; ^"CS^o 

u ouooQ feCHitDtii safO-c/jw 



3^ O 



s 

Eh 



ax 

C 0) 



01 0) 
^ -t-> 



5 

►Seh 



Maryland State Departmp]nt of Education 



1 



t Taught 
o 1959-60 


In Other 
States 


tn 


nd 


Who 
Previc 


In 
Maryla 






^% 

hnO 


C 


Who Ta 
1959 


In 

Maryland 



i2 



•S 6-12251 



z 

t3 



(N lO ift — 



iM M (N 



iM CC t- t- ( 





00 00 t-- (N 


o: 00 c I- 


^ ^ CD a: M 


c CO -f 


iM — X l- 










CO X — 


















cc CO ■«i< t- CO 


W lO ^ ■>:}< N 


IC (M « i« (N 


N iC — -H CO 


^ X in 


O 












iM 












00 


O O O t- CT5 


t- CD O 05 


CD lo oi 


03 iceot- rr 


in ox lo 


00 


CD »^ C~ iC O 


^ (M N 00 ec 


N CD N ^ N 


CO CO m <— 1 


t~ O X rl< 




>o ec CO 03 cc 


Ti« CD CO 


CO lO 


CD Tt CO C- 


CO in to in 




C- 00 o ^ 


O 1.0 O t- CD 


CD — '.D 


CO CD U3 CD C 


CD lO C X 


lO 


^ C- Tt> -rr — 


OJ iM — 


iM CO C<I 


CO IC ^ — 


03 IM ^ 


o_ 








OJ 


















X (N « 


00 t~ X irt 


N -.D X CT. 


O t> lO — 


— CO X o 




iM -Xi C 






















o 


O C CD O -> 


CD t> X 




X ^ CO ^ CO 


cr. M CD in 


c» 


i-t lo 00 lO 




— ^ ^ 






CD 













o o o CO 



03 CD C t> 



I CD lO X t- in c> CO CD 



,o ^ m t> CD (M 



cDc^ico-t— corjccco 



un X O (N 03 

■ 1 O ' " 
CO 



< oi c- in X t-. 



xoinin-* cDO^teo 
cDcD-^eoi-i ^ineoeo 
CO CO 



>> t 

a; 
o 



o o ^ 
E £ 



0) 

c _ 



CO £ 



C 0) o 



01 

ICQ ecu 



_ — -f- COJOcfl^ 
e< cs ojX O £: rt « O s; 



■ « CO 



is 1^1 

w I- 3 ^ O 



5 c - 

ill I 



142 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 71 



Number and Per Cent of Teachers New* to Maryland Public Schools : 1960-61 



Local Unit 


All Teachers 


New Teachers 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elementary (1-6) 


High (7-12) 


XT 1 

Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


24,101 


12,587 


11,514 


t4,492 


tl8 


6 


t2,265 


tl8 





t2,227 


tl9 


3 


Allegany 


638 


302 


336 


45 


7 


1 


20 


6 


6 


25 


7 


4 


Anne Arundel . . 


1,675 


893 


782 


453 


27 





205 


22 


9 


248 


31 


7 


Baltimore City. 


6,156 


3,221 


2,935 


822 


13 


3 


422 


13 


1 


400 


13 


6 


Baltimore 


3,654 


1,930 


1,724 


789 


21 


6 


397 


20 


6 


392 


22 


7 


Calvert 


175 


95 


80 


48 


27 


4 


25 


26 


3 


23 


28 


7 


Caroline 


195 


90 


105 


42 


21 


5 


18 


20 





24 


22 


9 


Carroll 


455 


226 


229 


98 


21 


5 


39 


17 


3 


59 


25 


8 


Cecil 


391 


206 


185 


86 


22 





39 


18 


9 


47 


25 


4 


Charles 


297 


152 


145 


51 


17 


2 


26 


17 


1 


25 


17 


2 


Dorchester 


237 


113 


124 


27 


11 


4 


9 


8 





18 


14 


5 


Frederick 


627 


323 


304 


130 


20 


7 


69 


21 


4 


61 


20 





Garrett 


188 


98 


90 


22 


11 


7 


11 


11 


2 


11 


12 


2 


Harford 


677 


342 


335 


163 


24 


1 


76 


22 


2 


87 


26 





Howard 


314 


163 


151 


86 


27 


4 


45 


27 


6 


41 


27 


1 


Kent 


148 


75 


73 


29 


19 


6 


15 


20 





14 


19 


2 


Montgomery . . . 


3,268 


1,757 


1,511 


835 


25 


5 


467 


26 


6 


368 


24 


3 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 


2,857 


1,488 


1,369 


769 


26 


9 


402 


27 





367 


26 


8 


168 


84 


84 


23 


13 


7 


8 


9 


5 


15 


17 


9 


St. Mary's 


245 


127 


118 


80 


32 


7 


45 


35 


4 


35 


29 


7 


Somerset 


181 


89 


92 


26 


14 


4 


12 


13 


5 


14 


15 


2 


Talbot 


175 


91 


84 


34 


19 


4 


18 


19 


8 


16 


19 





Washington .... 


745 


384 


361 


81 


10 


9 


31 


8 




50 


13 


9 


Wicomico 


398 


216 


182 


72 


18 


1 


38 


17 


6 


34 


18 


7 


Worcester 


237 


122 


115 


53 


22 


4 


20 


16 


4 


33 


28 


7 



* Teachers are considered "new" if they were not teaching in Maryland units the preceding year. 

t Transfers between units are included in individual unit totals and percentages but excluded from State total. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



'C 05 <M M 

« (N f«5 O 

o O "0 ic 

t>- CO »C CO C<5 



.-I 05 I C O 
CO to 00 <N 



00 o cr. 

00 to (M 

CO to tcs'TjibT 

OS »-< 1— ' 05 C<3 



>0 MO COOS 

(M 05 to 1^ ro 

COC^^OOIN-it 

lO lO (N C3 
l>00O(NQ0 



■-o o 
o "»< CO o; to 

OlOto'fN lO 
O ^ '-I 05C0 
>0(NO<NeO 



(N « ' O lO 
(N ^ O CO to 

05 00 c; co_^^ 

OOTf (M'to"-^' 

»o o o CO 

t^(N lOOOO 



'NCOCOCO t^OSC^'^'O 



t X t 



C^.C^XOl-^ 05 



■*Tt<-<fO.-i 05t^-OiCiN OO-^OOCOM 
odo'i-HrH (NC^fNCO-^ Tf-^eO-'fiO 



0> Oi C^lC^l o 



i-HCO>-oo:iO oioot^co- 



to (N coot- 



OOtOt^COO CO^0'^O0 00 i-OtCt^J^lO 

rH(NC0»OtO >C-t<r4rH-f< fOCOCOMC^l 



Tj< rH UO 05 0> 

O >-0 f CO '-O 

05 r-.*lC-H"05 

>-0 0> to CO 

co_oq_L': o_^co_^ 
oT cico Tfco 



C^l 35 lO 05 lO 

^^ to -f< CO 

O O O CO 
O5"05 0''oo''co" 
O M (N to 
CO 05 CO lO 00 



(M to 05 CO 
M '-O CO TP 

O -r 00 CO :q 
o t>."od to 
coo •-I — I 

to <N 05 i-O CO 



tooo5c<it>. 

to »0 CO <N 00 

05 .-H .-H t^l^ 

cdoso 03 lo" 

■'J'COOOO 



OOC^OOC^-H 
O>0t^00(N 
(N(>liO00CO 
O'l^-IN 'O'OO" 
OOiOCOO.-i 
CO CO O 



^ »0 05 t>. 05 
to T-H ^ CO lO 
t>.00<NtO^ 

^"i^-t^o-oo" 

O 'O -H O "O 
OCOCOtOIN 



(M W lO 05 (M 



lO to O 00 

coot^-i CO 

(M Tt^t^Ot* 



■*005COO 

eoiO'^oOTji 

CO t>. 00 (NO 

>ca5T}<*tCc£5 

tOiMCOIN'-c 
C0C0OC0 05 



eoco'»t*coco 



OOiTfr^to 
»cooi>. to 

N CO 00 CO 
■^'t^ CO CO CO 
CO -"t 00 i-O CO 

N CDodo'co" 
'H ^ (N (N 



iCt- 00 05 CO 
--I 00 Tji 05 
05_0 0_'^_CO_ 

osio'cD cor>." 

tO-^t^CT>tO 
CO uo O >.0 



t^ — 05 05IN 
^ 05 « >.0 
Tj<_O5O5C^_00_^ 

(M 050-^ 00 

CO 00 CO r-'^ 

tCiCOO't-* 

'J- tOOSr-H CO 



oo«cooo?o 

OIC^COCO'^ .... 
0505050505 0505050505 



>C O: J^l C^l 
iC 00 OJ CO o 
CO»Ct>.iN 00 
CDO"«C 'O'i'" 
t^COiOCOCO 

t^rroscooo 



00 t C o 

00 to t 
oqiNC-.'C 05 
tc'co to -r r>r 

05 rH .-H 05 CO 

lO i-O CO O t>^ 

O CO ^"^"o 



10C0OCC05 

(N o: to CO 



CQcq(Noq<>i_ co_^c^ioq CI -^^ 

05<-<'(N C5 to" •-< c"co"t>rcO 



■«CCOt^!.. 

, . . -: T-( 05 

l*^.*^ t>-_^00 O (N 00 
N CO Co' Co" t-" 05 (N 'O" 



00 CO t CO 



Oi t>. ^ 

CO CO coo 

o CO a to 

CXO'O (M-'-O 

O -I rH a CO 

i-O N O CO 

rHTf coco 05 
lO CO to to to 



W 00 >-0 10 
^ O CO to 

O5oq^c--co^_^ 
odt'c^i to'Tji- 
'Ct^ooco 
C>< '^ ooo_ 

C> i-^'0"05im" 
C^l W M (N CO 



OOO'-i'-i COC^iNCO-"** 



.-I 00 (N 05 to 
lO Tti ■Tf -"J* lO 



0-. a.oo'OM oot^—itoo C-. ooo;oi' 



t-t^OOiM CO 
CO 00 00 



CO N O >-o -r 



oooc toco ^ocott^ otoo-. 

'-I ^^1 ^^ >.~ ^ CO >0 CO IM >-0 t t rf ; 



lO 05 05 
O 'O rf CO '.O 

r-< -fi O -^^^Oi 

1.0 t>. 35 to CO 
CO 00 'O O CO 



IN 05 lO 05 >-0 
I^C^COrrCO 

o to <.o CO 
oios'o'oo'co" 

O C^l TP !N -0> 
CO 05 CO lO 00 

odto"(N o'co" 

Tp lO tCt-r- 



iM to -H 35 CO 
(N CJ LO M Tp 
O TP W CO -o 
O' t>.' X to -r 

CO C TP . i 

CO (N 05 



0005Nl^ 

m »o rv^ nri 



X M » (N -H 
O ' O In. X 

c>i ic X CO 



M CO 'J' CO < 



-M o\ Tp i.o 



TT 1.0 35 1>. 0> 

to — I — CO >-o 

X IN to 

o CO co§ o5 
t>-' r>.' t-T 35" of 



OXXXCO 
X X (N 05 'O 

r-< O COIN -H 

x't-To-o'os 

■0 05 too 

oiN iq^_t^ 
cococo">oVo" 



O O CO IN O 

05Tj«eO'-i TP 

05 Tj<^tO(N to 
CO* 00 to TP 
IN O X CO o 
05 CO IN X 05 
o'tCosfN O" 
IN M CO Tj* 



X M CO O) 

IN TP TP O 

CD CO 35 TP 
COO'OfN 
CO CO CD CI l-O 
CO 1.0 CO CO —< 



O 35 35 35 

UO X O 35 
w lO TP X_ 

Tp"t»"t>r-H"TP" 

to to CO TP 
-1 IN TP .-o 



O to to CO Ti 

N TP o 
tot>.x_tqco_ 

— 35tOOX 
to 35 (N Tp 



-I CO CO CO TP 
— X -"O LO 
TP_L-:X_35 N 
lO'lo'to'o: Tp" 
a 35 (N CO N 

35 tot- r- 

lo"tp"iCCO X" 
CO «0 35 



coxcoxeo weoTPLOto r»X350-* 

CO CO TP 10 i« O LO LO lO lO lO CD to 
C5 0505O5 05 0505353535 0S 35 35 O5 3; 



.s >. 



5 g 



C 4J ». 



00 

c £ o 
« Si 3 

— wo 

111 



£ S ^ 



r as 

ca M 



144 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 73 — Source of Current Expenses: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 
30, 1961 (Includes the following programs: day school, including kindergarten; handi- 
capped children; Federal funds for school lunch and special milk; junior college; adult 
education; and Teachers Retirement and Social Security for teachers paid direct by 

State.) 













■ 


'er Cent from Each Solt?ce 




Total 






Local Levy 




State 








Local Unit 


Current 


State 


Federal 


and Other 














Funds 






Local Funds 








Fed- 


Local 












Equal- 


Other 


Total 


eral 


Funds 












ization 










Total State 


$237,488,842 


$91,916,040 


$12,258,159 


$133,314,643 


12.0 


26.7 


38.7 


5.2 


56.1 


AllpflriitlV 


5,645,854 


3,336,906 


189,563 


2,119,385 


30 9 


28.2 


59.1 


3.3 


37.6 


Anne Arundel 


14!213.'415 


7!240',814 


1,102!091 


5!870!510 


22^0 


28.9 


50.9 


7.8 


41.3 


Baltimore City ... 


62,480,932 


18,438.297 


770,880 


43,271,755 


1.5 


28.0 


29.5 


1.2 


69.3 


Baltimore 


36,023,490 


9,610,219 


856,858 


25,556,413 


0.9 


25.8 


26.7 


2.4 


70.9 


Calvert 


1,527,358 


1.114,191 


91,980 


321,187 


44.6 


28.4 


73.0 


6.0 


21.0 


Caroline 


1,775,194 


1,214,784 


31,413 


528,997 


41.2 


27.2 


68.4 


1.8 


29.8 


Carroll 


3,730,732 


1,948,159 


66,336 


1,716,237 


23.3 


28.9 


52.2 


1.8 


46.0 


Cecil 


3,619,428 


2.058,624 


268,732 


1,292,072 


29.7 


27.2 


56.9 


7.4 


35.7 


Charles 


2,868,875 


1,908,028 


274.870 


685,977 


39.7 


26.8 


66.5 


9.6 


23.9 


Dorchester 


2,174,499 


1.272,474 


29,655 


872,370 


31.7 


26.8 


58.5 


1 .4 


40.1 


Frederick 


5,859,774 


2,698,099 


291,716 


2,869,959 


19.6 


26.4 


46.0 


5.0 


49.0 


Garrett 


1.747,531 


1,338,216 


37,104 


372,211 


49.3 


27.3 


76.6 


2.1 


21.3 


Harford 


6,623,940 


3,363.519 


832,742 


2,427,679 


24.5 


26.3 


50.8 


12.6 


36.6 


Howard 


2,861,414 


1.402.866 


199.191 


1,259,357 


21.6 


27.4 


49.0 


7.0 


44.0 


Kent 


1,301,440 


765.778 


46,491 


489,171 


30.1 


28.7 


58.8 


3.6 


37.6 


Montgomery 


38,444,149 


11.869.846 


3,245,885 


23,328,418 


7 2 


23.7 


30.9 


8.4 


60.7 


Prince George's. . . . 


26,524,149 


11.457.456 


2,876,598 


12,190,095 


16'3 


26.9 


43.2 


10.8 


46.0 


Queen Anne's 


1,520,711 


884.386 


28,602 


607,723 


31.7 


26.4 


58.1 


1.9 


40.0 


St. Mary's 


2.185,914 


1,302.225 


405,310 


478,379 


33.4 


26.2 


59.6 


18.5 


21 .9 




1,511,485 


1,184,264 


19,526 


307,695 


48.8 


29.5 


78.3 


1.3 


20.4 


Talbot 


1.495,358 


821,489 


28,483 


645,386 


26.0 


28.9 


54.9 


1.9 


43.2 


Washington 


7,733,988 


3,531.766 


465,101 


3,737,121 


20.4 


25.3 


45.7 


6.0 


48.3 


Wicomico 


3.478,093 


2.021,490 


49,494 


1,407.109 


29.4 


28.7 


58.1 


1 .4 


40.5 


Worcester 


2,141,119 


1,132.144 


49,538 


959.437 


25.3 


27.6 


52.9 


2.3 


44.8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 74 — Source of Current Expenses: Maryland Public Sch<M>ls: Year Ending June 
50, 1961 (Includes the following programs: day school, including kindergarten; han<li- 
japped children; Federal funds for school lunch and special milk; junior college; and 

adult education.) 













Per Cent from Each Source 




Total 






Local Levy 




State 








T 

Local Unit 


Current 


State 


Federal 


and Other 














Funds 






Local Funds 








Fed- 


Local 












Equal- 


Other 


Total 


eral 


Funds 












ization 










■'otal State 


$218,724,254 


$73,151,452 


$12,258,159 


$133,314,643 


13.1 


20.4 


33.5 


5.6 


60.9 


Allegany 


5,225,047 


2,916,099 


189.563 


2,119,385 


33.4 


22.4 


55.8 


3.6 


40.6 


Anne Arundel 


13,227,195 


6,254,594 


1,102,091 


5,870,510 


23.7 


23.6 


47.3 


8.3 


44.4 


Baltimore City .... 


56,955,978 


12,913,343 


770.880 


43,271,755 


1.7 


21.0 


22.7 


1.3 


76.0 


Baltimore 


33,336,189 


6,922,918 


856.858 


25,556,413 


1.0 


19.8 


20.8 


2.6 


76.6 


Calvert 


1,419,378 


1,006,211 


91,980 


321,187 


48.0 


22.9 


70.9 


6.5 


22.6 


Caroline 


1.641,567 


1,081,157 


31,413 


528,997 


44.6 


21.3 


65.9 


1.9 


32.2 


Carroll 


3,459,513 


1,676,940 


66,336 


1,716,237 


25.1 


23.4 


48.5 


1.9 


49.6 


Cecil 


3,342,562 


1,781,758 


268,732 


1,292,072 


32.1 


21.2 


53.3 


8.0 


38.7 


Charles 


2,655.931 


1,695,084 


274,870 


685,977 


42.9 


20.9 


63.8 


10.4 


25.8 


Dorchester 


2,026,901 


1,124,876 


29,655 


872,370 


34.0 


21.5 


55.5 


1.5 


43.0 




5,439,117 


2,277,442 


291,716 


2,869,959 


21.2 


20.7 


41.9 


5.4 


52.7 


Garrett 


1,621,083 


1,211,768 


37,104 


372,211 


53.1 


21.6 


74.7 


2.3 


23.0 


Harford 


6,135,975 


2,875,554 


832,742 


2,427,679 


26.5 


20.4 


46.9 


13.6 


39.5 


Howard 


2,648,254 


1,189,706 


199,191 


1,259,357 


23.3 


21.6 


44.9 


7.5 


47.6 


Kent 


1,201,785 


666,123 


46,491 


489,171 


32.6 


22.8 


55.4 


3.9 


40.7 


Montgomery 


35,237,173 


8,662,870 


3,245,885 


23,328,418 


7.8 


16.8 


24.6 


9.2 


66.2 


Prince George's. . . . 


24,501,972 


9,435,279 


2,876,598 


12,190,095 


17.6 


20.9 


38.5 


11.7 


49.8 


Queen Anne's 


1,414,356 


778,031 


28,602 


607,723 


34.0 


21.0 


55.0 


2.0 


43.0 


St. Mary's 


2,065,427 


1,181,738 


405,310 


478,379 


35.3 


21.9 


57.2 


19.6 


23.2 


Somerset 


1,394.872 


1,067,651 


19,526 


307,695 


52.9 


23.6 


76.5 


1.4 


22.1 


Talbot 


1,378,391 


704,522 


28,483 


645,386 


28.2 


22.9 


51.1 


2.1 


46.8 


Washington 


7.191,749 


2,989,527 


465,101 


3,737,121 


22.0 


19.5 


41.5 


6.5 


52.0 




3,222,403 


1,765,800 


49,494 


1.407,109 


31.8 


23.0 


54.8 


1.5 


43.7 


Worcester 


1,981,436 


972.461 


49,538 


959,437 


27.3 


21.8 


49.1 


2.5 


48.4 



146 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 75— State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Day Schools — 
Grades 1-12: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



T 

LiOCAL Unit 


Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


1 otaiT 


• 

Minimum 
Salaries 


Utner 
Current 
Expense 

Cost 


1 rans- 
portation 


Amountj 


Per Cent 


Total State 


$136,169,688 


$101,053,928 


$25,263,482 


$9,751,604 


$67,689,163 


49 


7 


Allegany 


4,189,499 


3,036,487 


759,123 


385,367 


2,827,721 


67 


5 


Anne Arundel. . . 


9,476,260 


6,868,851 


1,717,213 


889,644 


6,005,682 


63 


4 


Baltimore City. . 


33,230,548 


26,489,346 


6,622,337 


118,865 


11,075,096 


33 


3 


Baltimore 


19,150,582 


14,257,969 


3,564,491 


1,327,676 


6,081,393 


31 


7 


Calvert 


1,187,321 


763,800 


190,950 


232,448 


976,264 


82 


2 


Caroline 


1,335,960 


890,785 


222,696 


220,187 


1,045,917 


78 


3 


Carroll 


2,760,344 


1,946,728 


486,682 


317,123 


1,622,416 


58 


8 


Cecil 


2,527,542 


1,771,745 


442,936 


312,861 


1,723,450 


68 


2 


Charles 


2,071,872 


1,401,869 


350,468 


318,859 


1,646,171 


79 


5 


Dorchester 


1,673,800 


1,128,120 


282,030 


263,484 


1,097,030 


65 


5 


Frederick 


3,631,311 


2,590,526 


647,631 


391,712 


2,160,600 


59 


5 


Garrett 


1,479,496 


898,190 


224,547 


343,057 


1,179,172 


79 


7 


Harford 


4,237,085 


2,816,215 


704,054 


716,555 


2,733,771 


64 


5 


Howard 


2,001,911 


1,371,804 


342,951 


286,236 


1,140,890 


57 


6 


Kent 


950,824 


643,518 


160,880 


143,666 


629,341 


66 


2 


Montgomery. . . . 


16,885,502 


12,867,369 


3,216,842 


795,556 


7,594,437 


45 





Prince George's. 


15,308,555 


11,624,811 


2,906,202 


772,766 


9,093,230 


59 


4 


Queen Anne's. . . 


1,093,134 


713,535 


178,384 


199,599 


743,202 


68 





St. Mary's 


1,514,525 


1,004,283 


251,070 


257,495 


1,143,448 


75 


5 


Somerset 


1,246,445 


839,975 


209,994 


196,476 


1,040,040 


83 


4 


Talbot 


1,149,058 


787,554 


196,889 


164,579 


671,215 


58 


4 


Washington .... 
Wicomico 


4,841,722 


3,503,893 


875,973 


461,471 


2,838,887 


58 


6 


2,669,986 


1,812,010 


453,003 


362,724 


1,709,226 


64 





Worcester 


1,556,406 


1,024,545 


256,136 


273,198 


910,564 


58 


5 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: 

(a) total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State 

law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction 

other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and 

(c) the cost of approved transportation to public schools. 

t iTuition applicable to Bylaw 11 included in those columns only. 



Maryland State Department of Education 147 



TABLE 76 — Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Current Expenses 




Local Unit 


Adminis- 
tration 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Principals 
and 

Teachers 


Books, 
Materials, 
and 
Other 
Costs of 
Instruc- 
tion 


Oporation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Other 
School 
Services 


Fixed 
Charges 


Capital 
Outlay* 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



'ot al State 


2 


3 


1 


9 


65 


7 


8 


7 


8 


6 


4 


1 


7 


5 


1 


2 


25 





Allegany 


1 


8 


1 


7 


68 





4 


1 


8 


7 


3 


1 


11 





1 


6 


1 


4 


Anne Arundel . . 


2 


1 


2 


2 


66 


9 


7 





7 


7 


2 


5 


9 


6 


2 





29 


8 


Baltimore City. 


2 


1 


2 


3 


69 


2 


8 


2 


9 


4 


4 




3 


9 





8 


20 


2 


Baltimore 


2 


2 


2 





66 


5 


8 


4 


9 





4 


6 


6 


4 





9 


30 


7 


Calvert 


3 





1 


8 


60 


2 


4 


9 


6 





4 


6 


18 





1 


5 


31 


9 


Caroline 


2 


7 


1 


6 


62 


5 


6 





6 


4 


4 


3 


15 


6 





9 


21 


5 


Carroll 


1 


4 


2 


1 


68 


4 


4 


2 


6 


1 


4 


9 


12 


2 





7 


8 


6 


Cecil 


2 


1 


1 


7 


64 


2 


5 


7 


9 


4 


4 





11 


5 


1 


4 


6 


9 


Charles 


1 


8 


1 


2 


63 





7 


2 


8 





3 


1 


14 


6 


1 


1 


15 


9 


Dorchester 


2 










62 





3 


8 


8 


8 


5 


8 


14 


9 


1 


7 





2 




2 


1 


2 


1 


63 


1 


9 


1 


6 


9 


5 


9 


10 








8 


24 


5 


Ciarrett 


2 


3 


1 


4 


61 


3 


3 


9 


5 


1 


2 


7 


22 


3 


1 





2 


3 


Harford 


2 


2 


1 


9 


62 


3 


7 


7 


7 


1 


3 


5 


14 


4 





9 


26 


3 




1 


8 


1 


4 


66 


7 


4 


9 


5 


6 


5 


1 


14 








5 


22 


4 


Kent 


3 





2 


6 


63 


4 


5 


2 


7 





3 


5 


14 


4 





9 


12 


3 


Montgomery . . . 


3 


1 


1 


9 


61 





15 





9 





3 


5 


5 





1 


5 


31 


3 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 
St. Mary's 


1 


7 


1 


3 


67 


7 


6 


9 


9 





5 


1 


6 


7 


1 


6 


25 


4 


2 


5 


1 


7 


62 


6 


5 


5 


6 


1 


4 


8 


16 


2 





6 


14 


3 


2 


3 


1 


4 


56 


8 


7 


6 


7 


3 


8 


2 


15 


3 


1 


1 


18 







1 


8 


1 


8 


65 


8 


3 


8 


6 


5 


3 


8 


15 


6 





9 


21 


7 


Talbot 


2 


9 


1 


6 


66 


3 


4 


7 


7 


5 


2 


4 


14 


1 





5 


2 


2 


Washington .... 


t2 


7 


2 





61 


5 


9 


9 


8 


7 


3 


8 


9 


8 


1 


6 


11 


9 




1 


9 


1 


5 


65 


8 


5 


2 


7 


1 


3 


5 


13 


8 


1 


2 


19 


2 




1 


9 




9 


62 


7 


6 





6 


7 


3 


4 


16 


3 


1 


1 


7 


1 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



2.4 

1.9 
2.3 
2.1 

2 3 
3.5 

3.1 
1.6 
2.3 
2.0 
2.3 

2.3 
2.9 
2.5 

2.0 

3 3 

3.3 
1.8 
2.8 
2.7 
2.1 

3.3 
t2.9 
2.1 
2.2 



2.0 


68 


9 


9 


1 


9 





4 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


33 3 


1.9 


73 


7 


4 


4 


9 


4 


3 


4 


3 


6 


1 


7 


15 


2.4 


72 





7 


5 


8 


2 


2 


6 


2 


8 


2 


2 


31.3 


2.3 


69 


4 


8 


3 


9 


5 


4 


1 


3 


5 





8 


20.3 


2.0 


69 


1 


8 


7 


9 


3 


4 


8 


2 


8 


1 





31.5 


2.2 


72 





5 


9 


7 


2 


5 


4 


2 





1 


8 


35.9 


1.8 


72 


4 


7 





7 


4 


5 





2 


3 


1 





24.1 


2.3 


75 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


5 


5 


3 


2 





8 


9.4 


1.8 


70 


8 


6 


3 


10 


4 


4 


5 


2 


4 


1 


5 


7.6 


1.4 


71 


7 


8 


2 


9 




3 


6 


2 


7 


1 


3 


17.7 


1.1 


71 


4 


4 


4 


10 


1 


6 


7 


2 





2 





0.2 


2.2 


67 


9 


9 


8 


7 


4 


6 


3 


3 


2 





9 


25 9 


1.8 


76 


8 


4 


9 


6 


3 


3 


3 


2 


7 


1 


3 


2.8 


2.1 


70 


7 


8 


7 


8 


1 


4 





2 


8 


1 


1 


28.8 


1.6 


75 


1 


5 


5 


6 


2 


5 


8 


3 


3 





5 


24.5 


3.0 


72 





5 


9 


8 





4 





2 


7 


1 


1 


13.7 


1.9 


62 


6 


15 


4 


9 


2 


3 


6 


2 


5 


1 


5 


31.8 


1.3 


70 





7 


2 


9 


4 


5 


3 


3 


4 


1 


6 


26.0 


2.0 


73 





6 


5 


7 


1 


5 


6 


2 


3 


? 


7 


16 3 


1.6 


65 


1 


8 


7 


8 


4 


9 


4 


2 


9 




2 


20.1 


2.1 


76 


6 


4 


4 


7 


6 


4 


4 


1 


7 


1 




24.4 


1.8 


75 


4 


5 


4 


8 


5 


2 


7 


2 


3 





6 


2.5 


2.1 


66 


1 


10 


7 


9 


3 


4 


2 


3 





1 


7 


12.6 


1.7 


74 


2 


5 


8 


8 





4 





2 


8 


1 


4 


21.1 


2.2 


73 





7 


1 


7 


8 


3 


9 


2 


5 




3 


8.2 



♦Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding 
debt service. 

t Excludes Ford Foundation TV project. 

Note: Expenditures by State and Baltimore City for retirement of teachers and expenditures by State for Social 
Security for teachers are not included. 



148 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 77 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — K-12: Current Expenses* — Including 
Transportation: Maryland Public Day Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1961 















All Schools 
























Total including 


Total excluding 




























Teachers' 


Teachers' 


























Local Unit 


Retirement 


Retirement 


Elementary 




High 


Adminis- 




Fixed 




and Social 


and Social 


(K-6)t 




(7-12) 


tration! 


Charges r 




Security tt 


Security tt 




























Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 




$389 


07 




$357 


34 




$301 


22 




$405 


85 




$8 


31 




$4 


47 






347 


89 


21 


321 


39 


21 


284 


97 


17 


335 


99 


24 


5 


87 


22 


5 


13 


6 


Anne Arundel 


335 


53 


23 


311 


85 


23 


266 


16 


22 


345 


35 


21 


6 


75 


16 


6 


46 


2 


Baltimore City 


376 


08 


12 


341 


83 


14 


282 


19 


18 


409 


02 


8 


7 


24 


14 


3 


30 


17 


Baltimore 


408 


53 


3 


377 


23 


3 


325 


62 


3 


415 


85 


5 


8 


56 


8 


3 


63 


12 


Calvert 


352 


90 


19 


327 


72 


19 


264 


13 


23 


400 


23 


10 


9 


72 


6 


4 


94 


7 


Caroline 


399 


87 


5 


369 


35 


5 


292 


15 


12 


443 


88 


2 


10 


21 


3 


3 


13 


19 


Carroll 


345 


61 


22 


319 


98 


22 


255 


27 


24 


382 


86 


15 


4 


78 


24 


2 


24 


22 


Cecil 


380 


79 


10 


351 


35 


10 


289 


43 


14 


412 


67 


6 


7 


54 


13 


4 


83 


8 




378 


58 


11 


349 


61 


11 


308 


45 


8 


383 


90 


14 


6 


45 


18 


3 


97 


10 


Dorchester 


355 


17 


18 


330 


77 


17 


285 


98 


16 


357 


09 


20 


6 


70 


17 


5 


87 


4 




402 


16 


4 


372 


55 


4 


325 


20 


4 


403 


83 


9 


8 


16 


9 


3 


18 


18 


Garrett 


363 


91 


15 


337 


13 


16 


317 


77 


6 


336 


05 


23 


7 


98 


11 


3 


58 


14 




390 


57 


7 


360 


86 


8 


320 


28 


5 


387 


10 


11 


8 


11 


10 


3 


57 


15 


Howard 


370 


42 


14 


342 


28 


13 


300 


78 


9 


380 


41 


16 


6 


15 


19 


1 


71 


23 




387 


75 


9 


357 


53 


9 


295 


38 


11 


409 


43 


7 


10 


77 


2 


3 


48 


16 


Montgomery 


472 


54 


1 


430 


80 


1 


352 


12 


1 


494 


19 


1 


14 


56 


1 


6 


84 


1 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


371 


65 


13 


342 


54 


12 


291 


47 


13 


385 


55 


13 


6 


04 


20 


5 


62 


5 


412 


72 


2 


383 


47 


2 


328 


50 


2 


432 


72 


3 


9 


51 


7 


2 


27 


21 


St. Mary's 


357 


39 


17 


337 


40 


15 


286 


71 


15 


385 


95 


12 




97 


12 


3 


59 


13 


Somerset 


351 


67 


20 


324 


34 


20 


269 


85 


20 


377 


27 


18 


5 


79 


23 


2 


97 


20 


Talbot 


359 


28 


16 


330 


75 


18 


278 


19 


19 


376 


91 


19 


9 


90 


5 


1 


66 


24 


Washington 


390 


37 


8 


360 


93 




317 


57 




377 


78 


17 


10 


13 


4 


6 


01 


3 




334 


30 


24 


309 


36 


24 


269 


29 


21 


344 


26 


22 


5 


97 


21 


3 


93 


11 


Worcester 


391 


54 


6 


362 


02 


6 


298 


98 


10 


428 


77 


4 


7 


05 


15 


4 


05 


9 



* Excludes home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, veterans' training, and Federal funds for school 
lunch and special milk. 

t Expenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary and high costs. 
I Half-time kindergarten pupils, where applicable, are expressed in full-time equivalents in arriving at per pupil costs. 
° State payments for Teachers' Retirement and Social Security are not included in this column. 
Note: Excludes per pupil costs for Ford Foundation TV project in Washington County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 78 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — K-12: Current Expenses* — Excluding 
Transportation: Maryland Public Day Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1961 





All Schools 


Adminis- 
tration J 


Fixed 
Charges+° 


Local Unit 


Total including 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Securitytt 


Total excluding 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Security t J 


Elementary 
(K-6)t 


High 
(7-12) 




Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Pntnl iStatp 


$372.20 




$340.47 




$286 


51 




$385 


93 




$8.31 




$4 


47 




Allegany 


322.37 


15 


295.87 


15 


261 


46 


11 


308 


44 


22 


5.87 


22 


5 


13 


6 


Anne Arundel 


313.44 


19 


289.75 


18 


248 


61 


16 


316 


71 


20 


6.75 


16 


6 


46 


2 


Baltimore City 


374.93 


4 


340.68 


4 


280 


66 


6 


408 


47 


2 


7.24 


14 


3 


30 


17 


Baltimore 


393.85 


2 


362.55 


2 


315 


47 


2 


395 


33 


3 


8.56 


8 


3 


63 


12 


Calvert 


298.67 


23 


273.50 


23 


220 


48 


24 


327 


18 


18 


9.72 


6 


4 


94 




Caroline 


348.64 


8 


318.13 


9 


243 


42 


19 


389 


24 


4 


10.21 


3 


3 


13 


19 


Carroll 


315.39 


17 


289.75 


19 


227 


05 


23 


350 


21 


12 


4.78 


24 


2 


24 


22 


Cecil 


347.66 


9 


318.21 


8 


256 


91 


12 


378 


63 


6 


7.54 


13 


4 


83 


8 


Charles 


334.40 


13 


305.43 


13 


263 


72 




340 


52 


14 


6.45 


18 


3 


97 


10 


Dorchester 


311.24 


20 


286.84 


20 


245 


76 


1? 


308 


69 


21 


6.70 


17 


5 


87 


4 


Frederick 


375.19 


3 


345.58 


3 


298 


71 


3 


376 


30 




8.16 


9 


3 


18 


18 


Garrett 


294.64 


24 


267.85 


24 


249 


48 


15 


265 


46 


24 


7.98 


11 


3 


58 


14 


Harford 


346.23 


10 


316.51 


10 


273 


97 


7 


345 


34 


13 


8.11 


10 


3 


57 


15 


Howard 


331.67 


14 


303.53 


14 


264 


34 


9 


338 


51 


15 


6.15 


19 


1 


71 


23 


Kent 


343.92 


11 


313.71 


11 


251 


56 


14 


365 


61 


10 


10.77 


2 


3 


48 


16 


Montgomery 


461.21 


1 


419.47 


1 


342 


25 


1 


480 


70 


1 


14.56 


1 


6 


84 


1 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


359.82 


6 


330.72 


6 


283 


13 


5 


368 


89 


8 


6.04 


20 


5 


62 


5 


357.61 




328.35 


7 


272 


05 


8 


379 


51 


5 


9.51 


7 


2 


27 


21 


St. Mary's 


313.43 


18 


293.45 


16 


245 


16 


18 


337 


88 


16 


7.97 


12 


3 


59 


13 




305.53 


21 


278.20 


21 


228 


18 


22 


325 


09 


19 


5.79 


23 


2 


97 


20 


Talbot 


318.85 


16 


290.32 


17 


241 


55 


20 


331 


15 


17 


9.90 


5 


1 


66 


24 


Washington 


363.86 


5 


334.42 


5 


291 


26 


4 


351 


03 


11 


10.13 


4 


6 


01 


3 


Wicomico 


298.75 


22 


273.81 


22 


237 


21 


21 


303 


55 


23 


5.97 


21 


3 


93 


11 


Worcester 


339.77 


12 


310.25 


12 


254 


73 


13 


365 


73 


9 


7.05 


15 


4 


05 


9 



* Excludes home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, veterans' training, and Federal funds for school 
lunch and special milk. 

t P^xpenditurcs for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary and high costs. 
+ Half-time kindergarten pupils, where applicable, are expressed in full-time equivalents in arriving at per pupil costs. 
° State payments for Teachers' Retirement and Social Security are not included in this column. 
Note: Excludes per pupil costs for Ford Foundation TV project in Washington County. 



150 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



I— I 1— I r-H t>. t>. OJOl— 1050 

ooeccococo eococcccco 



CO CD Id 

ooeccococo -"tcocococo cocoeoco 



i-H i-H 00 f-l Tj< -rji 00t^O(NTt< eOOSlOTjHt^ 
CO ^00^-<t^ ■^OCOCO'-H ■*rH(N'-ICO 

00 ooeccococo COCOCOCOCO COOOCOCOCO 



lOOii-icoa) 

Oi-icOi-iO 
CO CO CO CO 



Tft^l-lOO 

M-^oieo 

CO 00 (N CO 



CO CO CC CO CO CO 



eOOlC^liMO OO^—iOfN 
COINCOCOCO COCOOOCOOO 



c<i05(Neoio o-^coco 

COINCOCOIN COOOINCO 



COOOCCM (M00OiO3<© t^OOOOSl^ CDt^OJiCiC COt^iC(N 

oo'oosooo i-Hi-oososoo t>.05t^r^o cc ^ oioscoos 

(NCS(NCOIN 00<NIM<N<M iM(N!NiNCO COWCOCCCl (NCSCSCS 



t>. 00--iTf*O'-i iCOt^t^i-i 



00 CO CO 00 
(N M (N IN 



TfOOCOO COcO»OI> 
O'COrficO COOOiOt^ 
00<NeO(N(N IN<N<N(N 



(M (N IM 



CO 00 -I CO 00 
(N C^l CC (N 



INt^OCOCO 
IN 'C Tji lO O 
IN CC (N <N (N 



CO "-1 CD >C rt< 
t>» ^ ts, CO ^ 

(M W <N (N (N 



'do 00 CD 

(N (N IN C^l 



t^T-irtW(N CDOOWCOt^ OfO— <tN.o lOWOt^'l* 00O5 00 CO 
01.-I10COCO COOCOOOIN OCOINCOCO 'O(NCD00iN CO-H-nrJ* 
C^J C^l IN (N (N C^l C^l (N (M CI C^J !N (M (M CC (M (N C-l IN C) IN (N Ol M 



iNTfHOOOOO TfcDOlOOIN OOO-^'OOO IXDC0COO5 OSCOCO'O 
(N 05 i-t >— I C0050'— iiN 00 00 05 i-i COO'^'-iO <-( i-H 05 CC 

(NrHiNINCS (NrH<N(N<N i-HC^i-KNIN (N IN N IN IN (N (N i-H <N 



cococoeoo 05-*05«oo 
'-HOOTfO'-i ^Oi050'-i 

(NrHiNININ IN>-i'-i<N(N 



icDTfoo-"** oocoosco iC'Ooor^ 

)IN05-HC0 -^OiNOOJ OOOOO 
I (N f-* (N IN (N IN IN IN rH iM .-h (M 



OS OO-^O-^CO 



»-l005'-ICO 



t^OlOCO'O CD'Oi-iOO-* 
OSb-iNOSOO O000505O 

r-H-HNr^—l (N r-H r-H r-l (N 



O5t>.->**00t^ 00>OTfl>.'*< 000305 "O 
t--.O0i05lN COOOt-iOSOO OOOt^Ol 

T-IINrHr-KN INt-IC^1-(i-H I-IIN>-t1-l 



(O S p 
M 2 « 



• >> 



M a ; a -a 2 2 
fl c6 ^ §^ S a S3 



« S S 
W Sen 



S a OS es'^ 



OOOOQ 



« 4) o ca ^ 



^11 



1:^1 i 



Maryland State Department of Education 151 



3 



^« 

3 
s 

I 

(A 

hi 
O 



s 

u 

tn 




3 5 



a. M 



CD O to CD 



COOCOO'^ 



o a> o — CO t-50<c_ _ _ 

OO^CDOO •«ti 03 1-1 lOCCOi 

i~-i'^ooeci-< oc<iO(r«5t^ oeot^ooic 



CO to 00 5© 



»c e<i ooc^oicc^ o>t>.coe«s. 

o>'^t^<Dec c<io>eot^t^ oot^c^iosi 



O CO CD CO 00 
CDiOCOOOOO 



0> CD ■<»< CD 



<N CD C<5 CD 



-a- rt< 05 .O 



<M CO O OC •<1< »C 00 05 CD Tt" — I ^ IC 



eo »opo 



■^CC't'C^^ l^(M»0>OTt< »CTf<CC»0'^ 



■ CO 05 (N 02 



oooou:> cOt-hojco 

COt~->OCOO 050CDCC 



lOCOOOt^t^ i-cO(MCOO 
)lf505 CO (M (M C<I O CO CO CC 

l(NC^1C^--< (MC<1<MC<IIM C<|(M(M<NC<1 



I CO CO c 



■ CO OS CO -H . 



<M ' 

o" d d d d 



(N CO eo O 
d d d d d 



c00C<»>O OCO'^OSOS (MCOOO' 



<M_e<i^co»o Tjieoeocoeo eoc^.-<eo 
d d d d d d d d d d d d d d 



05 (M lO-^ 



iccooor^ifs iccoiCTfeo Tf co ■>4< as 



OO CO CO CO • 



coo »ot^ . 



<M05eoeoT»< o OS ^ CD < 



OO lOOCOCOCO C^CDOCO»C 00 M -"tl T 

(M^COeO^ CJCO'^dcO OSOOMlCt^ 

•»}<'<tit^05C<l CDTf<if5»Ci(M t^C<lCD»OlCl 

(M<M1M(M(M C^(M(M<MM iM <M IM IM 



O CO CO 



O O CO o 
(Mooeooso 

d t-' Tt" >o 



^ OS C<J OS CO t- <M 



COb-OCOO(M 



. lO o ■ 

00 im' 



■ oocD cococDooira c^or-T-it- or^t^ocoo 



^2 



CD OeOOO-fCD QCOt^OOO Or~l>.C<«00 OOOOOTfOO OOOOt^^ 
»0 TficOtMOO OOSOSr-i<M iMiC^-^C^l -tiOOCOOOlC t- ^ OS 



eoc^ieoeoeo cocopococo cococoeoco 



OSO — «««5 CJS'^CSO 

ocot^c^-H — "*> a: >c 

^ CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 



-<CQCQO OOOOQ 




§0< ^-S 



a> P. 



"Si o ^ 



WW « 



152 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



«3 



-2 o 2 



IM IC 00 C<1 »«IM«OJOO 



QC oo — — . eo 



05 O «0 C«5 



■ C o o — ■ 



OC C C5 C<I O CC »« »ft I 

»cccos-. oc c — t- 

cc cc CC C<1 C<) C : 



icio 05 e<i CO 



CC (M — — 



— tC OO <M (M C (M CO 

t~ «o O ift coco«oco 

O IC CC ifS »- O OC l« 



>fl e<5 CO 



iC iC ^ — 



c «c 00 



CO CO C<I 



i« <M lO »0 C<l 



' CO (M <M 



CO O CO 
<M — CO O: CO 



c<i O "5 C5 
CO CO »c o 



o — o — oit^ico 
lO — — CO oc oc-^ooo 
(M (M — — — (M ^ 



lO CO o 05 CO CO — o CO C5 oc Oi — co o 05 co co coict^^ 

— e<I — — M CO (M l>> — C» Cvl — <M »C CO CO (M CO coc^^eo 

socoo oocoo coooo oc'o'co occo 



OSCOOOOiC IftCOOOlMlO <M OO CO »0 



l^t^C>«-^t^ OC Tj< t 

'•"fOCt^lC ■'J'UilMCO- 



OS C<» CO 05 00 
CO ifl CO CO OC 



00 •«»< — C5 
CO CO CO >ft ■«»> 



oo .— »c 

t— ■»»■ iC 



— — »C lO TP 00 



lO »c 00 

O O <M 
lO t-^Tf CO 



1 — — O CO 



Oi lO 00 CO 
— . CO IM — 
(M (M (M IM <N 



CO CO — 



OO TP CO CO 



O — IM — O 
O »0 <M CO »0 



O CO Tf CO 



• (M >C C5 cooococod 



1_ — o 

5i 



, 3 a 



lO t-cOcO(Mt- CCCO — c: 

00 CO O CO CO >ft — ' — CO oi — 
— c^c<i — lOcorOTfM' 



CO (M c: CO 00 

C»t C<1 OC lO CO 

— — l« TP TP 



(Ml^C^t^CO 1— TPiOt^QC 



— TP CO (M IC ■ 



(M >fl 05 00 



<M — oc CO C-. 00 r~ 00 
lOOiC^ccco r^ — ccc; 

CO <M CO C<l <M CO (M 



5 ca o 
■i o o ^ 



^ ^ 5 — • 



S3 



o O S m 

ii1J| i^iil 

OCOOQ Sp.O'^x 



Maryland State Department of Education 153 



a 

I 



O «1 CO O O C<) 
caotco'ccco — •^r^' 



>oc<o-ve<ico o". CJZ-i- 
'C o 0-. o 



1 C<I O CO — 



CO « S o 

5D »0 »C U5 OO 



— »« O -"J" : 
■ ^ r- — ' <M »c — — _ e<, _ ^ 



I CO 00 OC C5 

I oo ^ o; Tj" 



1 ift 05 — IM 



f CO o — 



«o o ^ to CO tM >o c. — 
iM ic o ""t" o CO i« 



05 CO O 
»C CO »« C5 



lO (M «0 C> CO CO lO >C 



lo ar> 



»/5 CO 
(M CC I- I- 

iC CO «o 



CC C: O M CO 



cc c: CO 



■OC0>0(M CO>fl05COC5 



o oc <M o 



IM ^ — CO 

o o o o o 



(M IM «C ■<»■ O 

d d c o d 



ooooo oocoo oooo 



ro o i« cs CO OS 



r~ to o t— ifs c: — 



oo CO «n 05 



' o to 

< <C CO o 



O (M lO 05 



IC lO — CSlflCO O >C — 1 
— l~COCO»OCO 0:CCO=0' 



CO 00 O O ! 



>C c: «0 c: 



O2cooit-co c; — rj< 
CO C O OO ic — CO c: a: — 
CO CO CO CO C<1 (M CO 



O CO Cvl «o 
OC CO 05 t- <M 

■V CO (M 



es <u « 
"o t o 

""I 



O «^ OC ■i*' CD 



— M o; U5 

(M O so (M 
CO d X CD QC — ' 



O «5 — C<l OO 
CD »0 CO — 

OC CS C75 CO 



CO CO — 00 t~- 



<M — (M — 



00 »« O «o 



«5a5iCOC>J — CO "5 oo < 
CO CO «5 CO C^— »«CD- 



(M — ^ ^ O: C M 



(35 »C M IC CO 

o; CO O oo <M 



00 CD r-- C 05 CO c ■ 



oc oc CD o; o 



I «M CO I 

1 — OC I 



00 O — •«»> — ICI 

CO CD O OS ■>»' >o N ic 



CO oc 



^- 3 e 
^ , a e 

cc =: c rt ?s 
-2 -<<252: 



c c o Q u. c 



N'T- Se -S c 



- C o 

:2: 



i I 



■5 o £i 



IP 



154 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 83 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1961 



Year Ending 


Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 


June 30 










Total 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$1,243 


$1,156 


$1,671 


1928 


1,408 


1,320 


1,830 


1933 


1,453 


1,398 


1,659 


1938 


1,556 


1,487 


1,784 


1943 


1,775 


1,648 


1,994 


1952 


3,886 


3,858 


3,919 


1953 


3,947 


3,891 


4,019 


1954 


4,093 


4,020 


4,186 


1955 


4,163 


4,104 


4,237 


1956 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 


1957 


4,719 


4,684 


4,760 


1958 


4,944 


4,821 


5,092 


1959 


5,247 


5,079 


5,447 


1960 


5,493 


5,436 


5,556 


1961 


5,852 


5,715 


5,999 



Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 84 — Average Salary* per Teacher and Principal: Maryland Public Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 


All Schools 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalst 


X oiai 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalst 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalst 


Total State 


$5,852 


$5,714 


$8,830 


$5,715 


$5,531 


$8,477 


$5,999 


$5,90 


$9,799 


Allegany 


5.494 


5,403 


7,174 


5,436 


5,325 


6,708 


5,545 


5,467 


8,405 


Anne Arundel. . 


5,069 


4,937 


8,093 


5,035 


4,857 


7,664 


5,107 


5,025 


10,005 


Maltimore City . 


6,183 


5,999 


10,181 


5,837 


5,593 


9,893 


6,577 


6,448 


10,809 




5,931 


5,802 


10,470 


5,829 


5,648 


10,208 


6,044 


5,968 


11,275 


i Calvert 


4,814 


4,649 


6,872 


4,759 


4,586 


6,428 


4,882 


4,722 


7,873 


Caroline 


5,205 


5,097 


7,200 


5,360 


5,273 


6,780 


5,083 


4,961 


7,620 


Carroll 


5,206 


5,091 


7,348 


5,000 


4,800 


7,241 


5,382 


5,325 


7,650 


Cecil 


5,368 


5,244 


7,275 


5,415 


5,273 


6,883 


5,317 


5,215 


8,450 


Charles 


5,541 


5,434 


7,573 


5,719 


5,662 


6,900 


5,357 


5,194 


8,163 


Dorchester 


5,263 


5,139 


6,700 


5,331 


5,200 


6,331 


5,203 


5,088 


7,500 


Frederick 


5,403 


5,274 


7,805 


5,307 


5,108 


7,483 


5,496 


5,425 


9,200 


Garrett 


5,267 


5,188 


6,257 


5,244 


5,132 


6,310 


5,297 


5,255 


6,125 


Harford 


5,597 


5,501 


8,200 


5,653 


5,544 


7,741 


5,540 


5,459 


9,314 


Howard 


5,513 


5,374 


7,971 


5,508 


5,342 


7,658 


5,518 


5,409 


8,720 


Kent 


5,117 


4,978 


6,687 


5,117 


4,923 


6,489 


5,118 


5,028 


7,283 


Montgomery. . . 


6,592 


6,469 


9,984 


6,448 


6,273 


9,527 


6,744 


6,667 


11.675 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


5,779 


5,626 


8,831 


5,732 


5,526 


8,443 


5,829 


5,729 


10,128 


5,299 


5,166 


6,865 


5,412 


5,287 


6,428 


5,188 


5,055 


7.850 


St. Mary's 


4,714 


4,575 


7,021 


4,703 


4,584 


5,973 


4,725 


4,605 


8.150 


Somerset 


5,040 


4,910 


6,387 


4,965 


4,847 


6,011 


5,113 


4,969 


6.871 


Talbot 


5,190 


5,065 


6,748 


5,103 


4,904 


6,484 


5,279 


5,210 


8,200 


Washington 


5,686 


5,581 


7,293 


5,563 


5,432 


6,899 


5,812 


5,725 


8,400 


Wicomico 


5,205 


5,100 


7,027 


5,232 


5,109 


6,659 


5,176 


5,091 


8,280 


Worcester 


5,191 


5,071 


6,850 


5,170 


5,034 


6,417 


5,213 


5,107 


8,150 



* Grades 1 through 12 only; kindergartens and junior colleges are excluded. 

t Includes all principals having two or more assistants without regard to division of time between teaching and 
dministration. 



156 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





cn 

2 

H 



0. 
3 



« On 

a « 
is 

-•a 

5 a 



a 



t-OMOOOi CON'^'^iO 



t-ost-osi-t «£>eooot><o 

t-Ot-iCU3 t-Oii-HOsO 
Ot-rH<DO TtOOt-OOO 



CO 05 o eo t> 



t-* t-" l> 00 CD 



oi ^ OS CO o mc-asoJN 



CD 05^3 05 05 
.-I C~ 00 IC 
lO O lO 00 



cDoi-^iceo 
(M CD T-i a> CO 



t- lO 00 t-l w 
OOOOiCt- 

o^oooo__t> 



oot>eoooQO 

1-1 00 OS N 

o^t-__a5_ai_cD 
o'cd'o ifi" 

01 00 (M t- -.f 
O O 00 

pi" ■^•*"•«a<■ 



eo m t~ t~ i» 

OOO Oi_CD__0 

Tjrr-rc--'"icoo 
m-*oeocD 



CD^OlOOTi* 

eocJCDi-H^ 

1-H 1-1 tH 1-1 Tjl 
CO CC ^ ^ 



OOlflOOt- 
(N CD OJ 00 (M 
(NO_00^-5l<__00_ 

irro"o"oo'"ar 
oi ca CD N eo 



'd'OONCDN 

Tf e<3 irt »H (71 
Tj<_a>N a5_o 

(N t- 00 05 e«3 
O 0> CO 00 OS 
00-^C^t-t- 



Tl< -^t irt ITS CD CDt-O0O0a> 



t-00 050.-l 
LOlOkACOCD 

cisti-oodio 

VO U5 lO lO CD 
d 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 



o -x ffi 



o-^oatr-^ iooooo«D imooeceo-^ 0(Mt-«ot- t-^^t- 

Tfco' eC-H ^"to CJCJ— * -rf— 'liOcf incxT — 'n'^" — *rf!^^.-^ 



© 

CO 

3 



X -I 



•• 

& ^ 

a -2 



3 fl 
a S 

X 3 



1 





H 



p J 



5- o 
W 



O 



o 



50 ec ^-^ccnr-* 



t- ^ ^ ^ ^ 

« o in N 

t> (TO O^t- (N 



eg t£) t~ Oi m X t- ^ t- 

-^xO(M-<t in as in ec 

t>-_^;D_x__-^__in <N05cg^_^ 

(N eg — ' cc ^ >-<' so eg" 



cgm in CO t-<;ccc50» --i^asc; t> scmcgo— egocg^ 



eg a; a; in 
X a: CO a: eg 
X eg t> X eg 



egx-^uneg mect-Tf 
in t> o o in to Ti< 05 cc 
rrcc-iTrt- eoxX'" 



eg a; m Tf 



t> eg !o t- 1> 

CO CO • O CO 

O^X --H 

'-iXCO«C>-i 



CO ^ CO X 

i-H X inx X 
t-_^__^_x_^«o 
©"x'x'areg" 
oinegcgco 



xegcgcgx 
xegocgo 
o^eg^^in ^_^t> 
OS eg' to" -^"o" 
t- ai CO o 
^ ^ eg 



t> Tj< 

X eg -<t «D oi 
t- «D th eg t- 

t-"-"* o'co"'^* 
X X '— I 05 



X in in 1-H 

Oi m CO in 

X i»_0 

c-"cg"x'"«D' 
t- eg !r> CO 

eg -H rH 



o OS «£> eg o 
o ineo ^ o 
eooocoos 



oxoinso 
eg t- «D eg Oi 
cDinxxo 



^ X ^ m 

Oi «D C£> CO 
05_t> «D x__ 

c X CO m X 
eg — ( 



X 05 ;d o: 5r> 
oi o «-! in 05 
in t~_cg_^t- 
eg' to" c"'-" eg" 
m CO eg m c 
CO — 



C--i)<XX 

^cgxx 
x__«)_-^^in 
t-'in'^o'co" 

X to 05 Tf 

eg —I ^ 



t-rHCg05t- 

co Oi in —I CO 
co_^x__— <_co_^in 
in Oi"in"o"cg" 
o — X to CO 
Oi ^ eg eg 



Tf ^ rH X 
CO tO^ OX 

CO t^,^.t-,t> 
Troi'-Trfin" 
eg —I eg to 
eg CO CO CO eg 



Oitoocoeo 

t- X t- X 

o oi ^ in m 
co"tc"x"co"-^" 
X eg eg o; 
CO CO eg 



eg m o to o 
X 00 to eg Oi 
CO CO CO o X 
o"— "o"uo"tc" 
eg o -X o: 
X X eg eg 



in OS CO OS 
-^oegeo 
t- eg m o 
in" x"t!<"o" 
to X to X 
-"*eocg 



• >> 

- Ol.tJ 

3 0) 0) 

c < ? ? « 



<D a; C « ^ 
CS O 01 



O O C CO 

bf 0. c 
= 2 Is 



C/3 SCcttrtrt SrtSJSO cw™^* b^'uS^ 
- <<;CQP5U UOUOQ CiHaffiKisi So-o"^ 



^ c 



K ? C 



158 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



C30 

'> s 
S 

es 

= 1 

B3 



o 2 

Si CA 

u ® 

h 



Kg 

OA. 

I 
O 
X 

o 



73 T! 

c c 
OH 



go 



ec o 

(M N 



cc a; ic • 



3 0) a; 
r t- t. 

S C 05 rt sj 



O C3 



0) o c 
C 1' C V ■ 



i3 C 

fog 



73 .S 

2 1 



1^5 

ill 

SCO'S 
tec «= 

:S o c 

a; 

o fi 
3 3 3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



TABLE 88 — National Defense Education Act: Expenditures l>y Local Units an<l 
State Department of Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Expenditures Under 


National Defense Education Act 


Local Unit 
















Title 


Title 


Title 


Title 


i 


Funds 


III* 




VIII* 


X* 


Total State 






"59^4 807 


<p X AO, 


$5 842 


State Department of Education . . 


34,142 


16,509 


4,631 


7,160 


5,842 


Allegany 


24,346 


13.589 


10,757 






Anne Arundel 


172,433 


146,402 


26,031 








148,320 


47,188 


41,620 


59",5i2 




Baltimore 


119,484 


82.822 


25,885 


10,777 




Calvert 


21,588 


17,508 


4,080 






Caroline 


10,995 


7,213 


3,782 






Carroll 


9,770 


8,396 


1,374 






Cecil 


14,663 


7,162 


7,501 








9,949 


9,949 










5,844 


1,079 


4,765 






Frederick 


33,903 


24,348 


9,555 






Garrett 


6,788 


3,094 


3,694 








65,650 


44,782 


11,679 


9,189 






11,577 


7,690 


3.887 






Kent 


12,385 


9,599 


2,786 


: : ; : 




Montgomery 


136,532 


88.360 


28,554 


19,618 




Prince George's 


88,792 


59,147 


29,645 






5,564 


2,240 


3,324 








19,049 


14,865 


4,184 






Somerset 


2,822 


2,822 








Talbot 


11,861 


8,733 


3,128 






Washington 


30,448 


11,018 


12,632 


6,798 




Wicomico 


18,653 


11,370 


7,283 






Worcester 


22,943 


18,913 


4,030 







* Title III — Science, Mathematics, and Modern Foreign Language. 
Title V — Guidance, Counseling, and Testing. 
Title VIII — Area Vocational Education — Technical. 

Title X — Improvement of Statistical Services of State Educational Agencies. 



160 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 89 — Federal Funds Alloted and Expended in Maryland: 
Vocational Education: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Type of 


Balance, 


1960-61 


1960-61 


Balance, 


Vocational Program 


July 1, 1960 


Allotment 


Expenditures 


June 30, 1961 


Total 


$30,235 


$572,323 


$558,173 


$44,385 


Agriculture 


1,118 


114,524 


114,718 


924 


Trades and Industry 


24,349 


304,596 


285,859 


43,086 


Home Economics 




104,253 


104,253 




Teacher Training and Supervision . 




15,566 


15,566 






4,768 


33,384 


37,777 


375 



TABLE 90 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher 
Training in Vocational Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 

30, 1961 



Type of Vocational Program 



Source of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trad^ and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 












State and University Funds. . 


$43,556 


$16,345 


$12,025 


$14,497 


$689 


Federal Funds 


47,856 


16,345 


12,025 


18,797 


689 


State Administration and 












Supervision 












State Funds 


31,947 


10,145 


10,779 


10,334 


689 


Federal Funds 


36,247 


10,145 


10,779 


14,634 


689 


Teacher Training 












University of Maryland 












Funds 


11,609 


6,200 


1,246 


4,163 




Federal Funds 


11,609 


6,200 


1,246 


4,163 





Maryland State Department of Education 



161 



TABLE 91 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in INIaryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Type op Vocational Program 



Type of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 


$558,173 


$121,756 


$288,986 


$109,654 


$37,777 


Instruction in Schools 












Day Schools 


244,445 


97,750 


108,378 


38,317 




Adult Education 


105,926 


7,661 


49,537 


46,500 


2,228 


Cooperative and Continuation 


121,920 




88,278 




33,642 


Supervision 


33,206 




25,948 


6,040 


1,218 


Instruction by the University of 












Maryland 












Volunteer Fireman 


4,820 




4,820 






Teacher Training and 












Guidance 


11,609 


6,200 


1,246 


4,163 




State Administration and 












Supervision 


36,247 


10,145 


10,779 


14,634 


689 



162 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 





i 



2 S 



S 2 



" S £ 2 



O C 



^ weoec 

U5 CO 

o lOt- CO 



• tC • OJ 

in 05" 



05 t> tH 
th (M 



00 00 

00 



CO (N 
>0 (N 



to m m • • in oi 
00 CO »C • • 



o ■«a< lo • 10 c- -co 

00 U5 10 -r}< • IfiKfi ■ t> 
O to to (N • -rf • N 



O to CC t- N iC CO 



t-O -00 00 -rfC^TfO: 00 

IMC- t-O Nt-ooeoo 



N to 
as 10 « !0 
(N OS t- CO 



CO a: 10 to >f5 
to CO 00 X 
eo_-*_^t> eo__eo_ 

COM ^'-H -h" 



osto -t--* o-^-*eo-* 
(Nio -(Nto oieo-tfino 

TfO •»-H(M 00«-^Ot- 



t- O IN 

t-iO'<j<eo(N 

01 o 00 m ix 



N OS N »0 
M to M ^ 
OtXMOtO 



t- >o 
t- (N 



00 05 (N to 
M T)< t- 10 



ec o 10 iffl oi 

OS 01 00 J5 
C<I i-H ^ 



•^intooioo Nireeo^ 

tO-rfOSC^JOO f-lr)<i-(iO 
tH rH ^ <N 



as CO i-i i-i to ict-oom 
00 •^'-H in CO 10 00 a> t-__T}< 
to''t-''>oi-rc<f 10 1/; CO* to" co" 



Tt< ,-1 ,-1 to CO 
(N 00^-<J<^O^.H 



"•tOitOt-^ iOOC-rl< 

ooooeoooos -"SiON^ 

Co'to'-^'lN C<r -^'"■<S'''iN 

CO ^ 



• 3 <D a; 
=! C cS 03 



>-i y « t 
rt ca OJrC o 



0. 0) o rt _ 



S Oh 72 73 



> ii 



iiS-l- 
TS o 00 J:3 

€/3-«^eo 
I I to 
■t^ I I 00 

•2 bfS 

S 2 S 

m M CO en 

0) a> a; a! 
3 3 3 3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



163 



TABLE 93 — Adiill Education: Receipts and Expenditures: Slate of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 


Receipts for Adult Education from 
Sources Other than Local 


Expenditures for 
Education 


Adult 


Total 


Federal 


State 


Fees from 
Attendance 


Total 


Salaries 


Expenses 


Total State . . 




!)>194, (by 


$111,018 






$040,^00 


$52,334 


Allegany 


14,516 


6,109 


5,520 


2,887 


10,476 


10,476 




Anne Arundel 


6,170 


779 


3,479 


1,912 


4,201 


3,987 


'2i4 


Baltimore City. . . 


273,391 


*142,329 


34,301 


96,761 


618,699 


585.915 


32,784 




55,352 


14,924 


25,103 


15,325 


70,487 


58,514 


11,973 


Calvert 


575 


204 


371 




70 


70 




Caroline 


1,597 


527 


617 


453 


1,194 


1,144 


50 


Carroll 


3,821 


542 


2,674 


605 


3,493 


3,126 


367 


Cecil 


3,335 


856 


1,283 


1,196 


1,738 


1,621 


117 


Charles 


1,395 


168 


1,227 




1,443 


1,443 




Dorchester 


1,247 


604 


629 


' 14 


1,232 


1,232 




Frederick 


8,009 


2,817 


3,902 


1,290 


5,178 


5,130 


48 


Garrett 


535 


127 


408 




474 


474 




Harford 


5,809 




2,556 


3,253 


8,298 


8,298 




Howard 


569 




569 




1,055 


1,055 




Kent 


1,907 


'ioi 


1,071 


435 


1,627 


896 


731 


Montgomery. . . . 
Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


79,834 


16,725 


8,370 


54,739 


88,191 


83,483 


4,708 


20,734 




6,074 


14,660 


48,247 


47,277 


970 


369 




369 




2,076 


2,076 






336 




336 




978 


978 




Somerset 


280 




280 




280 


280 




Talbot 


576 




576 




3,722 


3,350 


372 


Washington 


17,711 


6,918 


10,148 


645 


17,292 


17,292 






1,822 


637 


951 


234 


2,166 


2,166 




Worcester 


306 


102 


204 











* Fees received for Korean Veterans. 



164 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 91 — Adult E<lucalion Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment by 
Subject: State of Maryland: 1960-61 



Local Unit 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Trades and 
Industry 


Business 
Education* 


General 


Total State 


1,297 


46,548 


542 


8,113 


4,315 


9,298 


24,280 


Allegany 


26 


968 


32 


540 


132 


191 


73 


Anne Arundel .... 


17 


375 




24 


33 


146 


172 


Baltimore City . . . 


590 


23,637 




2,183 


2,047 


4,480 


14,927 


Baltimore 


208 


7,035 




944 


760 


1,151 


4,180 


Calvert 


1 


21 








21 




Caroline 


7 


150 




58 




51 


41 


Carroll 


10 


260 


20 


41 


'4i 


158 




Cecil 


10 


176 


24 


32 




120 




Charles 


6 


208 


12 


61 




135 




Dorchester 


6 


124 


30 


25 




69 




Frederick 


19 


706 


42 


45 


35 


261 


323 




4 


61 


11 






50 




Harford 


48 


1^31 


34 


160 


loi 


434 


502 


Howard 


4 


m 




13 


16 


32 




Kent 


6 


171 


15 




16 


97 


43 


Montgomery 


148 


5,991 


131 


2,927 


95 


775 


2,063 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


90 


3,809 




781 


435 


719 


1,874 


11 


263 


80 


100 


30 


38 


15 


St. Mary's 


6 


147 


48 


45 




54 




Somerset 


2 


43 






12 


31 




Talbot 


6 


93 


31 


17 




45 




Washington 


61 


784 


17 


61 


562 


144 




Wicomico 


11 


234 


15 


56 




96 


'67 


Worcester 

















* Includes Distributive Occupations. 



Marvlam) Statp: Department of Education 



165 



TABLE 95 — Adult Education Program : Title of Courses Offered : 
State of Maryland: 1960-61 



Title of 


Number of 


Title of 


Number of 


Course 


Classes 


Course 


Classes 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Arc Welding 

Vocational Agriculture 

Young Farmers 

Other Agriculture 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing 

Cooking 

Crafts 

Family Living 

Flower Arrangement 

Furniture Upholstering, Repairing 

Home Economics 

Interior Decorating 

Millinery 

Nursing 

Rug Making 

Self Improvement 

Sewing 

Slip Covers 

Other 

Total 

Trades and Industry 

Apprenticeship Training Course . . 

Auto Mechanics 

Barbering 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Cosmetology 

Electric Code 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Food Service 

Industrial Safety 

Machine Shop 

Mathematics 

Mechanical Drawing, Drafting . . . 

Plumbing 

Printing Trades 

Radio and TV 

Related English 

Steam Fitting 

Supervisory, Management 

Training 

Tailoring 

Welding 

Woodworking 

Other Trades 

Total 



14 



29 



181 
7 
3 
6 
5 
3 
4 
13 
19 
13 
9 
28 
37 
5 
3 

336 



210 



Distributive Occupations 

Business Education 

Real Estate 

Supervisory Management . 

Total 



Business Education 

Accounting and Bookkeeping. . 

Business English 

Commercial Arithmetic and Law 

Investment Planning 

Office Machines 

Office Practice 

Shorthand 

Typing 

Total 



General 

Americanization 

Apprentice Training 

Art, Arts and Crafts 

Boiler Operation and Safety. 

Ceramics 

Driver Education 

Elementary Education 

English, Writing 

French 

General Industrial Training. 

German 

Greek 

Home Furnishing 

Italian 

Mathematics 

Music, Singing 

Navigation and Seamanship . 

Parent Education 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Russian 

Secondary Education 

Sewing 

Spanish 

Technical 

Woodshop 

Other General Courses 



Total 



916 



166 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



2 
2 

JS 
3 
"o 






4» 
s 

fl .. 

C3 ID 

8 « 

i> 5 



« -0 



a 
a 

a 



-<f N <N ec --H 
00000 

t- ec 00 (N 
;c 10 <N 00 (N 

t-*'* o'■t-'■a5■ 
t-l^5lf5lOo^ 



wat-Oi 00000 



t- o in 00 1- 
«D o t> i-<_« 

0>^<-H 0_^(NTf 

-^-rjTcooo'o* 
rH r-l ^ rH 



1- oi 00 
o t- t- 

05 o »n ^ 

10 O O 

NecccTooo 



© o to O (» 
— I -i' t- 01 
x^in o__'t 
^ CO ^ ^ cc 

M OS Oi C- 

NX » N "^^ 



t- t- 35 00 1" 
O t~ Oi 
O^t-_^00_^(N 05 

ar-^'"oo''N">-<" 

OlN «£i iC ^ 

in 55 o ^ «o 



Per Cent 
of Total 
Average 
Number 
Belonging 
Partici- 
pating 
in 

Program 


Tf<t~t-int> t-ooosON 


Average 
Daily 
Partici- 
pation 


122,488 
139,585 
152.050 
111,396 
124,489 

136,639 
146,441 
156,507 
170,286 
186,533 


Per Cent 
of Total 
Schools 
in State 
Partici- 
pating 
in 

Program 


oc<!inTj«o cr. oininco 

t-XM-^tc t--^-*int- 
o:£>t>to«£ --s c- t- t- c- 


' Number of j 

Approved 
i Schools 
1 Partici- 
pating 
in 

Program 


t>*-OC<JcrO 3". rtinXrt 

iNccc-t-cQ ■^3:ccin35 



o X a-, o 
lOioiOinm mmmino 
c". a-- Oi 01 cr. Oi 05 



If 



. 

c c 
•r c 



1, t3 



O u 
«« c 

O I- 



-q-a 



■5 '5 



c c 

'E's 

o o 
a a 

O O 

4J -t^ A 



m 



— — "^ 



t- O M O 
O N X t> 

« (X. Tf O 

x-t-'eJeo-N 
X to N t o 
N in o t> i-i 



I to X 

' OS N 



3-. o in 05 
© OS o in X 
t- CO in cc oi 



C: -"t X 

X CO t- TJ" 
©'<l<'*C-tO 



m © to CO i;c 
eo 3-. X •>* ci 
in X rr x_^©_^ 
o'co'^'-^'t-* 

a: ic eo in (N 
m m 



3: —1 1- to 
o «c t> t> CO 
in to^^eo^N ©_^ 
:c o^x't-'t-' 
m eg CO 'S' 
•sC X to t> t- 



to 35X03© 
X to r-H X 35 
t> ^ Tf CO to 



in ooi-t^in 35_^ 



--iNtOcOC<I 

^ t- to X m 

©^ 3: 3; in -rf 
X-Ni-'Tt to* 
CO © CO CO 

•>* 35 cc X •«< 



o CO ^ in © 
© to X 35 

©__IN OS^rH^^tO^^ 

c^Ti-H co'to^in 
in in in ^ X 
1-1 1- o X X 



xinr-xo 

T-^ N N CO O 
tT 35 t-^in ■<3< 

CO 1-1 X t> 

in in »H x^t-_^ 

t-''x'"3r35''©'' 



— ' in o to 
CO to to -H t- 
so_^©__ 00 

in©'"'^'"©*eo* 

•q* CO 03 X CO 
35 © to X CO 



X X t- t- 

C0(NtO35X 

35^in©^eo_^oo 
t- X 35 

to © © 35 



in t-'t-'x"©' ^'co'-^'in to' 

«^ ^ ^ l-H 



t-©xcoTi< --00 3-. in 



si 



, ^ I ©coeot-t- tot-co-^35 
«-^? I ©t-xcoo3 TftotomTt 

• OJ !N 



<5£ S! 



H £ 



1-" in X i-i 
CO to 35 o in 
to_^eo^N oi^in 

x'"©*35'"©'"3r 

t- X 35 — 

CO to to t- 



to 3i in 33 

inc^rrxto 

rH 35__tO__X_^C0_ 

x'ln eo'oo 
in © © -rr CO 
t> 35^<N eo_^Tt 



1 © m 
) 3; 
■ 3: X 



N ^ to 35 OJ 

(N N —1 in in 

X to to X 
^ to CO 35 
— — 35 tO_^ 



© CO © CO CO 
X C<J OJ OJ in 
35__C0 ©__35_CO__ 
O"'io'c^t-"(N'' 

35 in t> CO o- 

0_^^5_X_^35_'t 

co't-'t-'x*©" 



c- c- m CO to 

eg .-I X 1-1 X 
C- 1-c 33 O 35 

eo"©''o'"t>in 

OJ 33 CO 05 X 

33 CO in CO X 



I CO Tj- in 

I o in in m 

35 3-, 33 35 35 



O t- X 35 O 

m in in o CO 
35 35 35 33 35 



Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



TABLE 97 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



Year 
Local Unit 


Number of 
Approved 
Schools 
Participating 
in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Total Number 
of One-Half 
Pints Milk 

Reimbursable 


Reimburse 
ment 
Paid 


1955-56 


772 


82.2 


21,833,604 


$ 820,471 


1956-57 


818 


85.6 


26,390,908 


983,689 


1957-58 


874 


89.5 


28,715,326 


1,080,048 


1958-59 


914 


92.7 


36,390,152 


1,286,797 


1959-60 


943 


94.2 


35,555,378 


1,354,115 


1960-61 


960 


93.5 


37,398,754 


1,436,752 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1960-61 



Allegany 


32 


94 


1 


1,015,887 


40,635 


Anne Arundel 


72 


100 





3,298,396 


130,052 


Baltimore City 


183 


98 


9 


8,749,509 


318,992 


Baltimore 


98 


96 


1 


6,512,117 


248,506 


Calvert 


14 


87 


5 


166,452 


6,096 


Caroline 


10 


100 





198,174 


7,144 


Carroll 


23 


100 





479,152 


19,315 


Cecil 


20 


83 


3 


427,264 


15,639 


Charles 


13 


86 


7 


468,299 


18,442 


Dorchester 


18 


62 


1 


220,090 


8,322 




35 


100 





392,101 


15,350 


Garrett 


15 


83 


3 


274,003 


10,581 


Harford 


25 


100 





1,186,665 


46,374 


Howard 


18 


100 





731,769 


29,073 


Kent 


13 


100 





208,346 


6,965 


Montgomery 


104 


89 


7 


6,209,982 


246,226 


Prince George's 


134 


99 


3 


4,703,467 


185,698 


13 


92 


9 


160,588 


6,193 


St. Mary's 


13 


68 


4 


285,312 


11,092 




13 


68 


4 


98,778 


3,198 


Talbot 


11 


78 


6 


160,955 


6,438 


Washington 


48 


94 


1 


676,051 


26,691 


Wicomico 


22 


100 





524,768 


20,879 




13 


72 


2 


250,629 


8,851 



168 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



c rt oa-r 
"5 o o c 



i-totr-ect> f^inc-miD ocoo^»-Js^ t>ot-cr>o w^oirt 

05!Cccoocr. (NiN'i'c^it- o;ccot£i'<s' ot-ootooi uot-— 

f-H^-Tco^T^"' oro5"eo"t-''o" ooec-^'o^* eooj t-'t-'oc c<roioo"kf5 

i-H t-i N N N 



t- Csl W OiX>«0 



x«DX!oa> (j;eoNei5« c~Tfaja>o> w^'^otj' 

-^-q-Mr-KN t-X50t-0 C^jTj-t-t-US t> CO -!)< i-l 

o^o_iat>o^ Oi^ooecoia '^^"^.^'"l."^. 

« t> r-reo'x' o"co"?oec x* cJiNo'ic^o -^(^^(^oo 

i-iecasai i-it-i <m n cod 



t- eo ec t> 
1-1 OS c- «c 



in o to ^ 

X t- X O 1-1 

« eo 00 <o in 

o in X in 
■t O CO t> 



^ t- CO :o CO 

tOXC0(M-tl< 

XXOtTM 
<N N 1-1 



■>a<xin!£>o ^r}<a>««o 

xc<i!Ct-«r> -^co^eoc- 

tOT)i_t>in;D cooi-<^N«o 

tS^-^cciS o'l-Tcqtcx* 

to^Tfom oMxa-* 

eo t> c~ 



CO «c in 
in CO CO 

C; in^ o> 



C c 



S £ 



t- CO N «o X 
<N N Oi "vD 
■«r X X^tM X 
o"T5rx''t>t-* 

in CT! o tD t- 
IX ^5 in X 



1-- N CO Tji 
O CO X X X 
CO ^ OS o X 



a>T)<<cin-* cotooscoeo 

oooai^t>x__ o^!Dt>cQcc 

G^-^i^Soc x^o'cTaro" 

OOCCt-O". X XCl-HCOt- 

in— ixc<i cot?^^ 



Tj- 111 m o 
in !£; c<i in 
o^Tt in 



o o o «c o 
X --H o ^ 
in X -^^in t> 
oT CD* CO* in 
t- Tf m 5C ^ 

CO C<1 t> 



in t> ^ o in 
t- in in t> in 

CO O X X CO 



CO O rr c — 

m X m a: 

Vt-''c<rx''«o 

^ CO m ^ 



c: CO 3i X in 

t- Tj- O CO t- 
<C CO CO CO o 



o 1-1 unco 
■»f in CO in 
co^co__o^x^ 

■<t O CO 



xcocx-^ cO'Hxcoin mio-^t-^ co-^como «c eo 

t>aieocox co-^cot-c- -^tcicomx Tttct-cco mxxco 

o_co_^x^co__o_ ^.^.'1^.'-'. ■^.'^.^.'"1,'^ ^."I'^.'^l 

co*!0 oTco'i—*" x'cj'crrx'co' cTin x'-^'co" o c't-'co'cT •x'"co''eo''x'" 

ox— 'co-^ — mcococo xcoav un^ ciuo'^co — c;-*^ 

— CO CO CO 



DC 

^^£ 



CO ;c X X 

m X — t- o 

t 

x" co^o'in co'o* 
a> c- in m 
in 55 n 



— < C5 CO CO 

in in o t> t- 
co_^C3^a>^t> t>-_^ 
■^'"-^''co'"'^'~x'" 

CO — I 55 — I 

CO CO 



CO CCS CO 1-1 
CO <X X o 

eo^t- Tf-rf 
o'"t>x*t-*t-'" 
t- o CO X in 



CO X X X CO 

in T}< C5 ;d 
co^c^i> -rr c;_^ 

in «o X a 
in in 



vn in Tf t- 
CO t- 
CO t> o x^ 

t> I* t- X 



Tt ^ X CO CO 

■># m o o 

CO O «D X_^C5_^ 

in 05 X in t> 
co'co* 



05 1- in in CO 
in !0 05 1-I o 
un CO x^o^eo^ 
T-'t-."' x'l-Tin 

rr tH ^ 05 05 
— < CO 1-1 1-1 



CC0OX05 

CO — I in 
■^.^.'^.^.'^ 
•^"©"oTin t-" 
in CD X 05 X 
m — ' CO 



inco©i-<x cDcoeo-* 

t-ineooeo eocD05CD 

co^,-H 05^05^ co_^ t-_^i;D in «5_^ 

oTx^x'in oT t-'c-*'* t-' 

05X^C0C£ coxco-<?> 

;C ^ ^ _ ^ -2 {,« „ 

co"co* 



S C C9 « cfl 

^ < m w u 



■ 0) to . 

b^'S : 

CJ C C tt 



Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



TABLE 99 — Participation and Types of Lunches Served: National School 
Lunch Program: Maryland Puhlic Schools: 1960-61 



Local Unit 


Number of 
Approved 
Schools 
Participating 
in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Average 
Daily 
Participation 


Per Cent of 
Total Average 
Number Be- 
longing in State 
Participating 
in Program 


Total 
Number of 
Type A* 
Lunches 
Served 


Total State 


793 


77 


2 


186,533 


32 


2 


30,611,974 


Allegany 


32 


94 


1 


10,071 


63 


4 


1,644,222 


Anne Arundel .... 


67 


93 


1 


9,935 


23 


9 


1,626,044 


Baltimore City. . . 


88 


47 


6 


14,894 


9 


7 


2,505,945 


Baltimore 


92 


90 


2 


32,639 


38 





5,272,909 


Calvert 


9 


56 


3 


1,053 


24 


5 


169,934 


Caroline 


8 


80 





2,150 


49 


4 


348,646 


Carroll 


23 


100 





5,477 


51 


8 


908,673 


Cecil 


20 


83 


3 


3,825 


40 


7 


632,712 


Charles 


12 


80 





1,721 


23 


4 


277,353 


Dorchester 


18 


62 


1 


2,295 


37 


9 


374,963 


Frederick 


32 


91 


4 


9,185 


64 


7 


1,491,153 


Garrett 


11 


61 


1 


2,583 


54 


7 


425,877 


Harford 


25 


100 





8,652 


52 


7 


1,414,461 




17 


94 


4 


3,674 


48 


5 


605,566 


Kent 


10 


76 


9 


1,290 


39 


1 


214,596 


Montgomery . . 


96 


82 


7 


25,477 


35 





4,197,224 


Prince George's 


118 


87 


4 


28,324 


40 


8 


4,708,190 


Queen Anne's. . 


10 


71 


4 


2,028 


55 


8 


333,850 


St. Mary's 


12 


63 


1 


2,074 


34 


4 


322,673 


Somerset 


8 


42 


1 


1,106 


25 


9 


187,109 


Talbot 


11 


78 


6 


1,563 


38 


1 


260,952 


Washington 


45 


88 


2 


11,115 


61 


3 


1,791,148 




20 


90 


9 


3,579 


34 


9 


584,430 


Worcester 


9 


50 





1,823 


34 





313,344 



* Type A — H pt. milk, 2 oz. protein, ^ c. vegetables and/or fruit, 1 serving bread, 2 tsps. butter or 
fortified margarine. 



170 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 100 — Capital Outlay Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 


i otal 


Expenditures for Capital Outlay 


Elementary 


High 


Administration 
Buildings 


Total State 


$69,335,601 


$25,493,085 


$42,374,401 


$1,468,115 


Allegany 


72,383 


18,672 


51,561 


2,150 


Anne Arundel 


5,608,033 


1,374,184 


4,233,849 




Baltimore City 


14,422,910 


4,887,549 


9,475,424 


59,937 


Baltimore 


14,787,495 


4,646,107 


10,126,169 


15,219 


Calvert 


663,608 


264,786 


390,228 


8,594 


Caroline 


449,507 


38,114 


411,393 




Carroll 


326,297 


87,332 


238,965 




Cecil 


248,360 


13,566 


232,684 


2",ii6 


Charles 


501,060 


137,734 


354,704 


8,622 


Dorchester 


3,284 


894 


1,745 


645 


Frederick 


1,765,866 


577,368 


1,188,498 




Garrett 


37,408 


37,127 


281 




Harford 


2,192,647 


800,058 


1,392,589 






763,603 


693,866 


69,737 




Kent 


167,784 


111,083 


56,701 






16,030,974 


6,833,892 


8,113,164 


1,083,918 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


8,330,516 


3,264,552 


4,792,656 


273,308 


236,693 


81,364 


155,329 






452,334 


303,838 


148,496 




Somerset 


385,996 


308,049 


72,151 


5,796 


Talbot 


31,684 


12,981 


18,215 


488 


Washington 


939,138 


774,433 


161,211 


3,494 


Wicomico 


766,759 


195,182 


571,523 


54 




151,262 


30,354 


117,128 


3,780 



Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



TABLF] 101 — Value* of Marylaiitl Public School Property per Pupil Belonging: 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Total 


Elementary 


High 


Local Unit 




















Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 




Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


Total State 


$682,258,728 


$1,131 


78 


$327,233,791 


$914 


32 


$355,024,937 


$1,449.53 


Allegany 


18,096,821 


1,139 


57 


6,079,126 


763 


14 


12,017,695 


1,518 44 


Anne Arundel . . 


48,959,252 


1,175 


95 


20,778,751 


845 


99 


28,180,501 


1,650.66 




146,962,613 


873 


35 


70,617,595 


667 


26 


76,345,018 


1,222.67 


Baltimore 


103,969,094 


1,210 


39 


48,813,156 


1,008 


93 


55,155,938 


1,470.19 


Calvert 


3,648,600 


850 


75 


2,031,600 


739 


62 


1,617,000 


1,048.71 


Caroline 


3,782,000 


858 


10 


1,700,026 


662 


96 


2,081,974 


1,129.60 


Carroll 


11,431,149 


1,080 


48 


6,072,927 


1,047 


76 


5,358,222 


1,120.12 


Cecil 


16,478,150 


1,752 


53 


6,252,400 


1,111 


95 


10,225,750 


2,705.51 


Charles 


8,350,089 


1,136 


00 


3,727,769 


855 


80 


4,622,320 


1.543.60 


Dorchester 


8,200,800 


1,355 


39 


3,345,300 


1,011 


00 


4,855,500 


1,771 .05 




17,337,405 


1,220 


43 


8,095,655 


1,051 


22 


9,241,750 


1,420.76 


Garrett 


4,712,160 


998 


25 


2,412,000 


891 


45 


2,300,160 


1,141.69 


Harford 


23,940,540 


1,457 


97 


11,877,584 


1,274 


31 


12,062,956 


1,699.10 


Howard 


4,784,640 


631 


52 


2,431,065 


555 


61 


2,353,575 


735.29 




3,322,900 


1,007 


46 


1,560,687 


815 


83 


1,762,213 


1,272.08 


Montgomery . . . 


104,563,094 


1,292 


16 


59,600,963 


1,193 


28 


44,962,131 


1,451.61 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's. . . 


84,220,673 


1,212 


30 


38,307,506 


948 


84 


45,913,167 


1,577.83 


3,686,875 


1,014 


10 


1,566,150 


735 


49 


2,120,725 


1,408.00 


St. Mary's 


5,799,459 


961 


88 


3,549,050 


971 


84 


2,250,409 


946.58 


Somerset 


4,347,618 


1,018 


94 


1,501,475 


612 


75 


2,846,143 


1,566.91 


Talbot 


6,253,415 


1,525 


41 


3,498,015 


1,459 


33 


2,755,400 


1,618.44 


Washington .... 


24,754,181 


1,323 


58 


12,363,631 


1,191 


12 


12,390,550 


1,488.62 


Wicomico 


16,916,200 


1,650 


04 


7,681,860 


1,254 


22 


9,234,340 


2,237.43 


Worcester 


7,741,000 


1,418 


75 


3,369,500 


1,023 


63 


4,371,500 


2,019.63 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



172 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 102 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation: 

June 30, 1961 





School Bonded Indebtedness as op 


1960 Assessed 


Assessed 


Per Cent 






June 30, 1961 




Valuation 


Valuation 


School 


Local 








Taxable at 


per Dollar 


Bonded In- 


Unit 








Full Rate for 


of School 


debtedness 






County 


State 


County 


Bonded In- 


is of Assessed 




Total 


Bonds 


Loan* 


Purposes 


debtedness 


Valuation 


Total State 


$414,335,626 


$330,897,249 


$83,438,377 


$8,777,767,742 


$21 


4.7 


Allegany 


5,128,807 


1,919,000 


3,209,807 


tl75,772,230 


34 


2.9 


Anne Arundel . . 


34,935,367 


31,818,000 


3,117,367 


t435,951,832 


12 


8.0 


Baltimore City . . 


86,695,000 


86,695,000 




t2,839,186,688 


33 


3.1 


Baltimore 


90,497,715 


75,219,000 


15,278,715 


1,629,118,265 


18 


5.5 


Calvert 


2,768,293 


2,074,000 


694,293 


27,286,770 


10 


10.1 


Caroline 


3,017,061 


2,360,000 


657,061 


36,587,657 


12 


8.2 


Carroll 


2,643,386 


400,000 


2,243,386 


143,360,452 


54 


1.8 


Cecil 


7,307,002 


4,720,000 


2,587,002 


103,484,435 


14 


7.1 


Charles 


2,013,296 


325,000 


1,688,296 


52,117,802 


26 


3.9 


Dorchester 


3,591,982 


3,075,300 


516,682 


71,697,280 


20 


5.0 


Frederick 


10,207,891 


6,855,000 


3,352,891 


189,068,183 


19 


5.4 


Garrett 


1,619,437 


1,075,000 


544,437 


38,881,135 


24 


4.2 


Harford 


12,806,216 


12,139,000 


667,216 


189,328,746 


15 


6.8 


Howard 


4,225,639 


1,963,000 


2,262,639 


105,904,527 


25 


4.0 


Kent 


1,432,837 


850,000 


582,837 


40,582,398 


28 


3.5 


Montgomery ... 


65,181,449 


42,586,949 


22,594,500 


1,252,138,455 


21 


5.2 


Prince George's 


52,004,625 


38,141,000 


13,863,625 


814,019,105 


16 


6.4 


Queen Anne's .... 


1,567,127 


1,040,000 


527,127 


43,350,101 


28 


3.6 


St. Mary's 


1,575,239 


1,575,239 


48,075,079 


31 


3.3 


Somerset 


2,253,612 


1,650,000 


603,612 


26,465,319 


12 


8.5 


Talbot 


2,548,124 


2,015,000 


533,124 


61,319,480 


24 


4,1 


Washington 


11,962,914 


8,075,000 


3,887,914 


1244,968,175 


20 


4.9 


Wicomico 


6,006,597 


4,742,000 


1,264,597 


125,513,608 


21 


4.8 


Worcester 


2,346,010 


1,160,000 


1,186,010 


83,590,020 


36 


2.8 



* General School Construction Loan. 

t Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



173 



TABLE 103 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest 
Payments per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



Local Uxit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. 
Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . . 

Frederick 



$687 


33 


$18 


92 


Garrett 








Harford 


322 


96 


7 


46 


Howard 


839 


11 


23 


44 


Kent 


515 


20 


12 


69 




1,053 


55 


33 


30 


Montgomery 


645 


49 


19 


71 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 










684 


54 


17 


60 


St. Mary's 


249 


85 


5 


72 


Somerset 


777 


13 


21 


08 




273 


90 


8 


61 


Talbot 


593 


67 


15 


01 


Washington 

Wicomico 


718 


56 


21 


93 


Worcester 



$543 


07 


$ 8 


05 


779 


90 


16 


28 


557 


74 


13 


77 


434 


42 


12 


04 


805 


49 


21 


30 


748 


57 


21 


32 


431 


05 


11 


87 


261 


26 


5 


54 


528 


17 


14 


21 


621 


57 


17 


74 


639 


65 


18 


46 


585 


89 


15 


64 


429 


97 


11 


24 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



174 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 104 



Calculated School Tax Rates and Published Tax Rates: State of Maryland : 1960-61 







Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 






Additional 




















Published 


Rates in 


Local Unit 


















Tax 


Districts and 








Current 


Capital 


Debt 


Ratest 


Incorporated 




Total 


Expenses 


Outlay 


Service 






PlacesJ 


Trifol Qfofo 


$1 


79 


$1 


46 


$0 


04 


$0 


29 








A 11 AcTQ r\\T 


1 


36 


al 


14 





01 





21 


$2 


20 




Anne Arundel" 


1 


73 


al 


29 









44 


b2 


16 


1.25— 1.55 


Baltimore City° 


1 


60 


1 


46 









14 


3 


60 




Baltimore" 


1 


88 


al 


46 





03 





39 


2 


54 




Calvert 


2 


09 


al 


37 





07 





65 


2 


17 


.75—1.25 


Caroline 


1 


84 


1 


33 





05 





46 


2 


35 


.25— 1.15 


Carroll ° 


1 


67 


1 


29 





17 





21 


1 


95 


.50— .85 


Cecil 


1 


72 


al 


20 





03 





49 


2 


42 


.35— 1.33 


Charles 


1 


59 


ol 


33 





13 





13 


1 


65 


. 50— . 65 


Dorchester ° 


1 


38 


1 


13 









25 


1 


85 


.10— 1.50 


Frederick" 


1 


61 


al 


31 





02 





28 


1 


88 


.10— 1.65 


Garrett ° 


1 


23 





97 





02 





24 


2 


35 


.40— .90 


Harford" 


1 


52 


al 


26 









26 


1 


61 


1.00— 1.15 


Howard ° 


1 


45 


al 


14 





03 





28 


1 


85 




Kent° 


1 


56 


al 


15 





11 





30 


2 


00 


.20—' .85 


Montgomery 


2 


32 


al 


90 





10 





32 


2 


53 


. 06— . 80 


Prince George's 


2 


06 


al 


49 





16 





41 


2 


42 


.25— 1.77 


Queen Anne's" 


1 


55 


1 


22 





04 





29 


2 


00 


.20— .74 


St. Mary's 


1 


26 


aO 


91 





08 





27 


1 


80 


.90 




1 


41 


1 


15 





06 





20 


2 


25 


.70— 1.45 


Talbot 


1 


38 





98 





01 





39 


2 


10 


.95— 1.15 


Washington" 


1 


74 


al 


40 





05 





29 


1 


89 


.35— .85 


Wicomico 


1 


63 


1 


10 





05 





48 


1 


96 


.40— 1.23 


Worcester 


1 


49 


al 


11 





10 





28 


1 


80 


.90— 1.40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by Local Boards of Education by total assessed valuations as used in 

calculation of State aid payments, 
t Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service levies are excluded. 
t Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau. 
° Calendar year fiscal period. • 

a Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874 as amended. 

b Average rate of eight election districts which vary from $1.95 to $2.34. 



Maryland State Departmf:nt of Education 



175 



TABLE 105 



Local Revenue Appropriations: Maryland Public Schools: 1960-61 



Local Unit 


Local 
Revenue* 


Appropriations for Public ScHOOLst 


Per Cent of Total Revenue 
Appropriated for Public Schools 


All School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


All 
School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


Total State 


$363,509,513 


$158,238,615 


$128,301,925 


$4,702,953 


$25,233,737 


43 


5 


35.3 


1 


3 


6.9 


Allegany 


6.941,433 


2.459,338 


2,067,322 


15,100 


376,916 


35 


4 


29.8 





2 


5.4 


Anne ArundelJ 

Baltimore City J 


15,393,036 


7,480,052 


5,541,533 




1,938,519 


48 


6 


36.0 






12.6 


150,341,682 


45,109,778 


41,326,299 




3,783,479 


30 





27.5 






2.5 


Baltimoret 


57,097,494 


31,692,702 


23,825,363 


1,305,491 


6,561,848 


55 


5 


41.7 


i 


3 


11.5 


Calvert 


1,112,036 


588,217 


385,107 


20,000 


183,110 


52 


9 


34.6 


1 


8 


16.5 


Caroline 


1,594,459 


713,520 


513,086 


21,000 


179.434 


44 




32.2 


1 


3 


11.2 


Carrollt 


4,344,752 


2,219,995 


1.721.841 


190,775 


307.379 


51 


1 


39.6 


4 


4 


7.1 


Cecil 


3,668,366 


1.841,630 


1,285,059 


29.380 


527,191 


50 


2 


35.0 





8 


14.4 




2,054,928 


904,771 


754,980 


75,754 


74,037 


44 





36 7 


3 


7 


3.6 


Dorchester t 


2,563,392 


1,019,720 


839,065 




180,655 


39 


8 


32.7 






7.1 


Frederickt 


6.451,760 


3.109.991 


2,584,667 


27,200 


498,124 


48 


2 


40.1 


•• 



4 




Garrett t 


1.876.256 


471.549 


348,856 


14.900 


107,793 


25 


1 


18.6 





8 


hh 


Harford t 


5,236.806 


2.843,492 


2,253,553 


1S,096 


571,843 


54 


3 


43.0 





4 


10.9 


Kent: 


3,067,052 


1.547.999 


1,206,788 


35.647 


305,564 


50 


5 


39.3 


1 


2 


10.0 


1,382,369 


! 613,456 


464,759 


26,344 


122.353 


44 


4 


33.6 


1 


9 


8.9 


Montgoniorv 

Prince deorgc's 


40,982.656 


! 28.798,429 


23,579,409 


1.292,005 


3,927.015 


61 


3 


50.2 


2 


7 


8.4 


32,013.430 


17.085.7SS 


12,370,363 


1,326,558 


3,388,867 


53 


4 


38.7 


4 


1 


10.6 




1,544,951 


702.557 


549,275 


14,945 


138,337 


45 


5 


35.5 


1 





9.0 


St. Mary's 


1,913.439 


621,776 


449,256 


39,769 


132,751 


32 


5 


23.5 


2 


1 


6.9 


Somerset 


1,137,076 


386,798 


315.750 


16,363 


54,685 


34 





27.8 


1 


4 


4.8 


Talbot 


2.145.792 


SS2.64S 


621,337 


9,500 


251.811 


41 


1 


29.0 





4 


11.7 




7.335.429 


3,773,090 


2,936.774 


70.407 


765,909 


51 


4 


40.0 


1 





10.4 




4.446.670 


li 2.087,106 


1.406,580 


63,719 


616,807 


46 


9 


31 .6 


1 


4 


13.9 


Worcester 


2,864,243 


1 1,284,213 


954,903 


90,000 


239,310 


44 


8 


33.3 


3 


.1 


8.4 



* Figures from State Fiscal Research Bureau: include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t Figures from annual financial reports of Local Boards of Education adjusted to conform to county's fiscal period. 

X County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1960. 



176 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 106 



1960-61 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County Purposes: 

State of Maryland 



Local Unit 



Total 

Assessable 
at 

Full Rate* 



County Commissioners 



Total 



Real Estate 



Personal 
Property 



Federal 
Housing 
Authority 



State Tax 
Commission t 



A through J 
Motor 
Vehicles t 



Total State . 



Allegany 

Anne Arundel" 
Baltimore City 
Baltimore". . . 
Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll" 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester ° . . , 

Frederick" 

Garrett ° 

Harford" 

Howard ° 

Kent° 

Montgomery . 
Prince Georgc't 
Queen Anne's'' 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington". . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$8,832,905,932 

175,812,040 
436,226.634 
2,893,688,528 
1,629,118,265 
27,286,770 

36,587,657 
143,360,452 
103,484,435 
52,117,802 
71,697,280 

189,068,183 
38,881,135 
189,328,746 
105,904.527 
40.582,398 

1,252,138,455 
814,019,105 
43.350.101 
48.075.079 
26,465,319 

61,319,480 
245,289,913 
125,513,608 

83.590,020 



$6,863,597,452 

125,584.630 
365,050.032 
1,996.037.988 
1,348,442,035 
23,428,590 

29,202,087 
109,077,292 
74.663,585 
42.268.912 
52,782,170 

137.744,833 
26,612,085 

140,254,066 
84.337.767 
32,534.048 

1,088,817,675 
694,108,635 
36,656,121 
37,661.289 
20,863,879 

51.234,740 
182,848,475 
92,918,338 
70,468,180 



$6,665,265,029 

120,160,230 
358,820,207 
1,951.844.958 
1,330,138,840 
22,170,970 

26,748,201 
99.429,215 
68,641,475 
39,644,372 
47,597,910 

114.151,148 
22,818,242 

131.884.629 
80,562,837 
28,612,833 

1,075,716,780 
685,115.445 
32,946.945 
35.176,939 
19,318,937 

47,319,875 
171,687,015 
89,061.542 
65.695,484 



$198,332,423 

5,424,400 
6,229,825 
44,193,030 
18,303,195 
1,257,620 

2,453,886 
9,648,077 
6.022,110 
2,624,540 
5,184,260 

23,593,685 
3,793,843 
8,369,437 
3,774.930 
3,921,215 

13,100,895 
8,993,190 
3,709,176 
2,484,350 
1,544,942 

3,914,865 
11,161,460 
3,856,796 
4,772,696 



$55,138,190 

39,810 
274,802 
54,501,840 



321,738 



$1,914,170,290 


$266,832,194 


50,187,600 
70,901,800 
0843.148,700 
^^280,676,230 
3,858.180 


7,461.000 
19,358,206 
50,234,778 
47,226,752 

1,615.392 


7,385,570 
34,283,160 
28,820,850 

9,848,890 
18,915.110 


2,589,425 
7,261,410 
4,116,426 
4,620,879 
3,474,824 


51,323,350 
12,269,050 
49,074,680 
21,.'i66.760 
8,048,350 


8.207,726 
2,062,787 
9,801.801 
5,338,838 
1,889,813 


163,320,780 
119.910,470 

6.693,980 
10.413.790 

5.601.440 


33,664,071 
28.988.017 
2.079,550 
3,746,105 
1,487,727 


10,084.740 
62,119,700 
32,595.270 
13,121.840 


2,636,131 
9.823,108 
5,765,803 
3,381,625 



* Excludes classes A through J motor vehicles. 

t Data are for the year ended December 31. 1960, adjusted as of October 1961. 

t Estimated by dividing net receipts after distribution to incorporated towns and places by the county tax rate. 
" Fiscal period ends December 31 ; all others end June 30. 

a Includes assessment for tools and machinery and inventories of manufacturers as required by Baltimore City Ordnance number 643. 

Ordnance number 1340 provides that this assessment be removed over a four-year period beginning 1959. This figure also includes 

assessments for some government property which is in litigation. 
h Includes assessments for some government property which is in litigation. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



O'. X I- 
—■(N (30^00 
00 N !D »H (M 

t~C0O5(M(N 
00 ?D 



00 o 00 
00 ?o X — a: 
ifS CC ^ 



00 ■-< a-. ifMN X a: o lO m 

'nD X o X ec ^ in t- 

o_oocca;__io ^ o eo o 
X oi lo o x'trT 



o o t o 
iM ai ^ a> 
« IN in ic 

—I in in ec 
to X 



O N .H M ,H 
i-lTtXmrH 

ineoco 00 «o 

«o t- CD in N 
<-! ffO oi in 
++++..* r 



inp5 N 05 ec 
xoasr-io 
05 ec oi t~ 1— I 



eoeoNi-tM 

X«>OSr-l(N 

in in lo in OS 



osoxweo 
xa>«Doeo 
CO 00 •<j<^t- oi 



X OS o o 
05 CO in m 
o;cor-( 



CC ^ t~ X 
0> OS 

a5X<nTi<N 



CO oi a> oj 
i-ic^iecxiM 

"a* --H o X o 



X «D X eo CO 

«£> IN X Ol (M 

oi (N eo t- CO 



OJ CO in ->1< -rf 
I- t>(N CO 
tH O o> O 

N ooo aTi"" 

C<I CD CO CO 
O CD 



M-tXCO 

o CO X in 
X_CO >-H o_ 
co" in 05 CD* 
in CO o t- 

CO ^ 



X CD CO 
CO 05 t~ CO 
CO 00 CD 

i> co'cToTco* 
in o t-H CO 
"-Hcooeo 

CO I-H 

I I I I 



X CO CD O X 
X CD CO 
CO CO 05 X 

i-TTt in o'cD 

CO -H X t CD 



CD.-H,-lt-a5 

r-< i-H inco CO 
•^00 oos^co 
00 in 00 1> CO 
"S'c^eoeocva 
OS in 



CO CO in 1 
o oeo < 
inoiCD t 



in CO [- in t- 
CO in CO CO CO 
05^0 CO CD in 

C0'"x'"00rH CD 

ininoeoco 
1-1 CO in CO 



in o T-i X 05 

X 05 O iH 
-S'COOCDOl 



o r-ico int^ 

CD -"i" CD coo 

rH ,-1 0> X 



COCOOrHTjl 
CD 05 rH O Ol 

«£>CDC0C0O 



X o in o 
CT> 05 05 in 
t-coin^ 



O O CD X —I 

CO in o X 

--H t> O Oi ^ 

co'in '-roTco" 
xmco OS 
c-i ^ 



CO CO CO m CO 

'-lC0O-<^<O 

XCO-<trHTl< 



x^cococo 

CD 05 X CO 

incOfHcoo 



in o X Tf o 

CO CD X CO 
COCOOOO) 



CO X X -<f 

ogTteox 
CD CO in o 



in T)< X in 
^ Tj" t> in o 
t-^in oi cD_^co 
o t-'in t-'in 
X in in 

CO r-l 



CO in X X X 

Xt-OCO'-l 

cox->i<a5 0i 



CO CO CO CO 

CO in CO CO CD 

COCOt>OrH 



OCOCOOSCO 
X'H 05X01 

x^co^cD__co^eo 

m rH ,-1 



xxco^ 

O 05 
•^05 05 



«0 CO X CO 

XOlOCOCO 

X^CD_CO^CO_^Tt 

oToco"-'}!" TjT 
CO CO o o 

05 1-t 



CO 05 Tt t- 
C0XXO5X 

oeo "-teo CJ5 



XC00005 
■<i"OXt-^ 
CO co__in CO in 

■—I CD X in in CO ■^t-'cT 
inrHco.-i.-i -^co^ r-i 



o in S S o 
in CO t- ^ CO 



t>OrC05 
C0t-O5b- 

05 in CO in 



T3CJ 
§ £ £ 



s B ca c« c« 



I. V CD 

UOOUQ 



<u a; o 

2 cfl cfl o a> 



0) o c 
c a> c ' 



C 'c cn 



g<t:<j 



m 0) (V 
a) ■>-) *j 
cfl O o 
m C C 



til C 

I A (U CI 0} 01 

■(J I, c ai 0) 

* ++ CO 



178 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 108 

Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging: 

1959-60 





Total Basis Assessable at 


Number of 




Local, Unit 


Full Rate for County 


Pupils 


Wealth per Pupil 




Purposes 


Belongingf 




— „ . — 

Total State 


$8,832,905,932 


579,841 


$15,233 


Allegany 


175,812,040 


15,880 


11,071 


Anne Arundel* 


436,226,634 


41,611 


10,483 


Baltimore City* 


:2,893,688,528 


154,288 


18,755 


Baltimore* 


°1,629,118,265 


85,844 


18,978 


Calvert 


27,286,770 


4,289 


6,362 


Caroline 


36,587,657 


4,352 


8,407 


Carroll* 


143,360,452 


10,580 


13,550 


Cecil 


103,484,435 


9,403 


11,005 


Charles 


52,117,802 


7,350 


7,091 


Dorchester* 


71,697,280 


6,051 


11,849 


Frederick* 


189,068,183 


14,206 


13,309 


Garrett* 


38,881,135 


4,720 


8,237 


Harford* 


189,328,746 


16,420 


11,530 


Howard* 


105,904,527 


7,576 


13,979 


Kent* 


40,582,398 


3,298 


12,305 


MonlKomerv 


1,252,138,455 


72,727 


17,217 




814,019,105 


69,472 


11,717 


Queen Anne's* 


43,350,101 


3,636 


11,922 


St. Mary's 


48,075,079 


6,029 


7,974 


Somerset 


26,465,319 


4,267 


6,202 


Talbot 


61,319,480 


4,100 


14,956 


Washington* 


245,289,913 


18,127 


13,532 


Wicomico 


125,513,608 


10,252 


12,243 


Worcester 


83,590,020 


5,363 


15,586 



* Calendar year (1960). 
t Excludes kindergarten pupils. 
t See footnote "a" on TABLE 106. 
° See footnote "b" on TABLE 106. 



MarylAxND State Department of Education 



kOr-<eoicoo 1-1 •«*" 00 00 OJ 
o 03 00 1- eo-^-^c-io 

^ .H tH i-H 1-1 



ot-ooio«r> ■<d< -<a< <x> Oi t- 

(M^^^^ C<l(N(NCOC<I 



CD 



I 



oiMt-toeo ooi-iocot- 
THecHcOTj" -jj" «D lo 



eC00U5I>Tl< rJtittOOOr)* 
<D00 00iO00 000300503 



o o e «j "e o c 



9 J 

z < 

asp 
OH 



>ra 03 1- ?D (N c^ecor-^-^ 
CO DO ec ec ■«^' lO ic ire m >f5 



o -J 



(Nec-^ire«o t~ooo30i 
lo lO ire lo lo ire ire ire 5c ! 

Ol 03 03 03 03 O: 05 03 0> < 



•5" 



«J O 

c . 



180 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



o 



o IN -rtoot- • -se- 

as lo ec • in ■ 

N N 1-1 



eo IN N 00 ^ 



rt o 
to 



JS o 



t- ■ ec IN — I 



O 3 



Wc3 



to 



i« 00 tr- 
ie ->1< 



it 

o 3 



1^ 



ll 



IN INN^ MIN-^'-'CC 



cc w cr. t- I 



<C CO (N N 



5« 



:C lO 



O C- IN tXN 



^ 3 £ 
5 So;! 



=2 C C3 



.5=: 
l> It 



o o a ^ 
£ rt cs o <D 



£ O C 
So; C « £ 

' o 



|8| 

0? fl 



Maryland State Department of 



Educatio 



am iiiii 



iiiii iiiii 



liiii MsB 



i 



iiiii mm 



182 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 112 



Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 

FaU of 1960 



Class 


Grand 
Total 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 



Teacher Training 



Total 


3,504 


389 


351 


907 


352 


1,505 


Freshman .... 


1,328 


180 


75 


363 


149 


561 


Sophomore . . . 


913 


66 


109 


268 


98 


372 


Junior 


725 


79 


89 


181 


56 


320 


Senior 


518 


56 


69 


95 


49 


249 


Fifth Year.... 


20 


8 


9 






3 



Arts and Science 



Total 


245 






105 


57 


83 


Freshman .... 
Sophomore . . . 
Junior 


175 
66 
4 






74 
27 
4 


41 
16 


60 
23 


Senior 




























Other Students 


Total 


142 






54 


36 


52 


Extension : 
Graduate .... 
Undergraduate 


31 
21 
69 






■ 45 
9 


■ 24 


31 
21 


Other 


21 






12 








1 






Campus School 


Elementary . . 


783 


120 




215 


213 


235 



Maryland State Department of Education 183 



0^ 



< O IN 00 ( 



> .-H O OO I 



00 00 Oi CO 



,-1 iO • QO >0 



J3 



1 «S| 05 • 

.-1 • U5 



CO • • • 



^ ■ ■ C-i T-i • CO I 



O <N — I , 



CO • »-H ( 



■ O -H • TJ< CO -05^ 



<M 00 C<1 O CO CO e<l CO >C -OOlOOO t - CO — t-- Tt< ^ IN 



CO e<j 00 «o • o5 >f5 — ■ lo — — 

IN . „ „ «0 ^ CO .-I I 



OC «0 OOCOOOOOCO Ot-C'S"'«ti — CO'^lOifl OSOOt^lftlN Or-^IN 
CO COCO-^-^ (NcqiN coco C^l — iCtDCM 



5>CO5C0 OOCOINCO— < O(N-He<IC0 05b-«0»C»0 t~e^M'^ 
5«5<M-H ^ CO — ' ^ ^ »0 ^ C<1«00" 



M< O ■»t" — 1- QC OO-^CO-^O QO IC CO — ICIOOOS ^COOt^ 

O t— c^t--.ioa5»-i <M CO CO CM cocooe^^ — c>— <coco cm t~ co 



I I 

1 1 

c o 



_ a* O) 



57 cii 

S C c« « S! 



• -5 J<a • . . 
■^-c £ aj c 



S o c 



^ o 



§5 
s £ 



184 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Table 114— Enrollment in Arts and Science at Maryland State Teachers Colleges 
by County: Fall of 1960 



Area 


Grand 
Total 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


Total State 


245 






105 


57 


83 


Out-of-State. . . 


7 






3 


4 




Allegany 


88 






88 






Anne Arundel 


5 






2 




' 3 


Baltimore City 


32 










32 


Baltimore 


47 






■ 2 




45 


Calvert 
















6 








6 




Carroll 


1 






' i 






Cecil 














Charles 














Dorchester 


10 








io 




Frederick 


3 






3 






Garrett 


3 






3 






Harford 


1 












Howard 














Kent 














Montgomery 


1 






1 






Prince George's 














1 








' i 




St. Mary's 
















6 








■ 6 




Talbot 














Washington 


' 1 






"i 








22 






1 


21 




Worcester 


11 








9 


" 2 



Maryland State Department of Euucation 



18 



613 

3 

u 

© 



pd)BinOIJ!)t!UJUO>^ 



p3;)Binoij)Buiuox 



pa^^inotj^Bj^ 



po)B[nou')t;nmo\- 



pa^BjnDU'jBj^ 



pojBjnoiJjKnmox 



pa^BinDU^Bj^ 



pa'jBinouiBj/^ 



pa^BinouiBinuo^ 



paijBinoujBrauo^ 



pa^qnouit;!^ 



pa^qnotj'jBoiuoN^ 



p3'}qnou')Bj\^ 



>f5 O 00 



CO CO <>J O 



00 o to 



1 ^ 

1 1 

c o 



o . — 

5 a* - 



I " ^ 



is 



<<aacao ooooQ fcosasiac; Sa-o-iJ?-^ 



e9 e« O ' 



•3 ci - 

ll'ii 



186 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 116 

Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1952-1961 







Current Expenses 


Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Year 
Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees* 


To 
State 



BOWIE 



1952 


262 


$261,264 


$32,810 


$228,454 


$997 


$125 


$872 


1953 


331 


316,737 


59,506 


257,231 


957 


180 


777 


1954 


343 


351,712 


72,599 


279,113 


1,025 


211 


814 


1955 


338 


363,046 


75,092 


287,954 


1,074 


222 


852 


1956 


321 


388,296 


71,585 


316,711 


1,210 


223 


987 


1957 


301 


435,714 


70,800 


364,914 


1,447 


235 


1,212 


1958 


305 


454,809 


72,839 


381,970 


1,491 


239 


1,252 


1959 


330 


472,120 


91,132 


380,988 


1,431 


276 


1,155 


1960 


346 


513,573 


92,985 


420,588 


1,484 


269 


1,215 


1961 


380 


580,229 


98,844 


481,385 


1,527 


260 


1,267 



COPPIN 



1955 


267 


$172,823 


$9,625 


$163,198 


$647 


$36 


$611 


1956 


295 


199,662 


9,148 


190,514 


677 


31 


646 


1957 


289 


238,292 


10,352 


227,940 


825 


36 


789 


1958 


317 


262,896 


11,179 


251,717 


829 


35 


794 


1959 


347 


286,047 


13,584 


272,463 


824 


39 


785 


1960 


352 


332,064 


12,529 


319,535 


943 


35 


908 


1961 


354 


410,974 


12,982 


397,992 


1,161 


37 


1,124 



FROSTBURG 



1952 


338 


$318,342 


$42,462 


$275,880 


$942 


$126 


$816 


1953 


373 


402,258 


88,372 


313,886 


1,078 


237 


841 


1954 


394 


418,682 


58,716 


359,966 


1,063 


149 


914 


1955 


458 


459,180 


57,667 


401,513 


1,003 


126 


877 


1956 


564 


484,506 


65,589 


418.917 


859 


116 


743 


1957 


548 


585,568 


63,651 


521,917 


1,068 


116 


952 


1958 


533 


660,283 


75,669 


584,614 


1,239 


142 


1,097 


1959 


659 


741,680 


114,939 


626,741 


1,125 


174 


951 


1960 


799 


865,201 


163,727 


701,474 


1,083 


205 


878 


1961 


1,002 


1,054,647 


203,947 


850,700 


1,053 


204 


849 



SALISBURY 



1952 


174 


$282,935 


$22,765 


$260,170 


$1,626 


$131 


$1,495 


1953 


234 


349,424 


54,129 


295,295 


1,493 


231 


1,262 


1954 


250 


343,124 


41,983 


301,141 


1,372 


168 


1,204 


1955 


338 


386,826 


64,918 


321,908 


1,144 


192 


952 


1956 


362 


416,580 


68,945 


347,635 


1,151 


191 


960 


1957 


313 


450,320 


51,424 


398,896 


1,439 


164 


1,275 


1958 


337 


494,967 


49,515 


445,452 


1,469 


147 


1,322 


1959 


343 


510,803 


62,672 


448,131 


1,489 


183 


1,306 


1960 


381 


543,933 


85,709 


458,224 


1,428 


225 


1,203 


1961 


393 


617,078 


99,357 


517,721 


1,570 


253 


1,317 



TOWSON 



1952 


855 


$757,257 


$92,816 


$664,441 


$886 


$109 


$777 


1953 


851 


842,915 


121,076 


721,839 


990 


142 


848 


1954 


893 


962,662 


135,050 


827,612 


1,078 


151 


927 


1955 


1,033 


1,024,421 


173,733 


850,688 


992 


168 


824 


1956 


1,170 


1,120,202 


180,904 


939,298 


957 


154 


803 


1957 


1,233 


1,239,538 


196,399 


1,043,139 


1,005 


159 


846 


1958 


1,232 


1,370,552 


210,037 


1,160,515 


1,112 


170 


942 


1959 


1,345 


1,483,923 


278,001 


1,205,922 


1,103 


207 


896 


1960 


1,434 


1,605,057 


283,139 


1,321,918 


1,119 


197 


922 


1961 


1,563 


1,833,698 


310,910 


1,522,788 


1,173 


199 


974 



* In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945, tuition for teacher training students at the Teachers 
Colleges was eliminated as of September, 1945. Beginning in 1957-58 board is $266 at Bowie, Frostburg, 
Salisbury, and Towson, for teacher training students planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college 
students who are residents of Maryland pay $150 additional; out-of-state students pay $400 for either 
junior college or teacher education curriculum. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



TABLE 117 — Source of Expenditures*: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 







Total Expenditures for Current Expenses Paid by 


Statk 
Teachers 
College 


Grand 
Total 






General Adminis- 
tration 


Instruction 


Dietary Services 


Plant Operation 
and Maintenance 






State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


Total 


4,406,626 


$ 

3,770,586 


$ 

726,040 


% 

534,326 


12,124 


$ 

2,250,569 


$ 

168,402 


1 

248,853 


$ 

387,929 


1 

736,838 


$ 

157,585 




580,229 


481,385 


98,844 


76,190 


277 


240,911 


2,657 


35,110 


62,776 


129,174 


33,134 




410,974 


397,992 


12,982 


58,121 




257,437 


245 


17,263 


12,017 


65,171 


720 


Frostburg . . 


1,054,647 


850,700 


203,947 


109,769 


6,727 


511,106 


36,939 


61,017 


115,696 


168,808 


44,585 


Salisbury. . . 


617,078 


517,721 


99,357 


81,591 




284,671 


32,541 


31,136 


47,597 


120,323 


19.219 


Towson .... 


1,833,698 


1,522,788 


310,910 


208,655 


5,120 


956,444 


96,020 


104,327 


149,843 


253,362 


59,927 



* Current year cash disbursements and encumbrances less budget credits. 



TABLE 118 — Inventories of Maryland State Department of Education, Teachers' 
Retirement System, and State Teachers Colleges: June 30, 1961 



Departmrnt or College 


Total 


Land and 
Improvements 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 


$20,277,268 

390,726 

29,468 

3,515,691 
2,064,347 
4,901,462 
3.332,998 
6,042,576 


$2,269,204 


$15,189,020 


$2,819,044 

390,726 

29,468 

326,726 
264,225 
444.114 
475,332 
888,453 


Slate Department of Education 


Teachers' Retirement System 






State Teachers College, Bowie 

State Teachers College, Coppin 

State Teachers College, Frostburg 

State Teachers College, Salisbury 

State Teachers College, Towson 


281,257 
397,451 
733,013 
180.615 
676,868 


2,907,708 
1.402.671 
3.724,335 
2,677,051 
4,477.255 



188 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 119 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System : Members in Active 
Service and Their Contributions: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



County or In'stitutiom 



Grand Total 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 

Total Schools and Departments 

Teachers Colleges 

Bowie 

Coppin 

Frostburg 

Salisbury 

Towson 

Departments 

County Libraries 

Education 

Forests and Parks 

Research and Education 

Other Colleges and Schools 

Barrett School for Girls 

Md. School for the Deaf 

Md. Training School for Boys 

Montrose School for Girls 

Morgan State College 

Rosewood State Training School . . . 
St. Mary's Seminary-Junior College 
University of Maryland 



Amount Contributed 
Year Ending 
July 31, 1961 



$10,390,090 

$9,327,897 

201,728 
450,260 
2,611,016 
50,513 
65,018 
127,175 
134,682 
103,598 
68,889 
199,962 
61,089 
235,269 
104,541 
47,617 
3,204,605 
986,219 
54,365 
52,888 
55,912 
56,022 
256,037 
123,073 
77,419 

$1,062,193 

$140,218 

13,660 
18,539 
30,520 
15,800 
61,699 

$97,297 

55,191 
38,589 
3,143 
374 

$824,678 

1,384 
10,244 
11,453 

3,848 
68,778 

4,476 

9,556 
714.939 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



TABLE 120 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 







Number Having 


Per Cent 


Having 


Local Unit 


Total Number 


Parent-Teacher 


Parent-Teacher 




Schools 


Associations 


Associations 


Total Counties 


842 


832 


98 


9 


Allegany 


34 


30 


88 


2 


Anne Arundel 


72 


72 


100 





Baltimore 


102 


102 


100 





Calvert 


16 


16 


100 





Caroline 


10 


10 


100 





Carroll 


23 


22 


95 


7 


Cecil 


24 


24 


100 





Charles 


15 


15 


100 





Dorchester 


29 


29 


100 







35 


35 


100 





Garrett 


18 


18 


100 





Harford 


25 


25 


100 







18 


18 


100 





Kent 


13 


13 


100 







116 


116 


100 





Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


135 


135 


100 





14 


14 


100 





St. Mary's 


19 


17 


89 


5 


Somerset 


19 


19 


100 





Talbot 


14 


14 


100 





Washington 


51 


50 


98 







22 


21 


95 


5 


Worcester 


18 


17 


94 


4 



190 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 121— High School Equivalence: State of Maryland: 1952-1961 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 
of 

Certificates 
Issued 


Completed 
Examination* 


Earned 
Certificate 


Earned Certificate 
through USAFIt 


1952 


779 


527 


580 


1,107 




1,005 


700 


613 


1,313 


1954 


1,377 


887 


837 


1,724 


1955 


1,495 


885 


717 


1,602 


1956 


1,476 


854 


967 


1,821 


1957 


1,603 


954 


740 


1,694 


1958 


1,802 


963 


837 


1,800 


1959 


1,681 


867 


722 


1,589 


1960 


1,850 


951 


712 


1,663 


1961 


1,940 


1,002 


833 


1,835 



* Indicates re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



1900 
Popuhi- 
tion 


3,027,259 

84,169 
206,634 
939,024 
492.428 

15,826 


19.462 
52,785 
48.408 
32,572 

29,666 
1,369 

21,744 
1,998 

20,420 

76,722 
36,152 
3,602 
340.928 
"16,799 

357,395 
16.569 
38.915 
3.540 
1,351 

21,578 
91,219 
49,050 
23,733 


Circula- 
tion 


11,697.299 

319,251 
560,796 
4,535,535 
1,145,0')9 
34,248 


85,534 
128,152 
79,190 

17,941 


87,186 
8,239 
59,085 

180,516 
162,168 


2.609,347 
125.133 

711.979 
55.548 
73,170 
6.799 
5.609 

1 10.655 
409,174 
150,478 
36,557 


So § 

z 


,258,350 
74,024 

1 Jl),48o 
,726,466 
216,487 
4.278 


Tf> 05 OS -H 
— ' CO O CO 
•«l^CO O C5 

00 ciTj^ao" ic 


25,450 
3,995 
21,266 

50.388 
21.896 


421,400 
31.137 

156.190 
1 8,233 
24,558 
6,028 
5,171 

52,713 
122,991 
32,310 
16,617 



Oi t£-0 



• O CO 

• 00 05 

•05--^ 


i ; ; ;i ; 


. -o • 
. .in • 
• (M • 


§ : : : 


. . . 


l«o«^ ! ; 

<M 


i ! ! ! ! ! '. 


! ; ; 
• -S • 


CO ; ! ! 





< S 



e3 _g.2 



O »c c; 



— 00 CO — 

O QO 



»0 00 OO ■ 
■xS^CO 



Cil CO C<5 C«t CO 



O (M OC If 



M o — 



CO o; CM oc 
o e<j CO CO 



00 »0 C5 I--. 

o C5 



CO i« — O 
•O OC O — CO 
— lO IC — (M 



c>i" f 

(M t- CO — 



«5 CO CO 00 

05 05 f 

00 CD • _ 

oc'co 



05 05 eo O 



C<) CM »o 

I Tf< — 

• CM O 



CM I~ C: — — 



CM 05 CO •<*< 

CO O CO o 

CO CM IC iC 



. CM 03 CM CM 



oc O 
30 C5 CM CO — O IC CM 
t~ CM — t^^ .»»<COC5C5 



c C ao 
S O " 



O "50 
OOO 
US CO >o 



5 CO 



CO O 
c: CO 

t^oo" 



iOO — 
OOO 
OC CO— ^ 



O O CM 



O CO 
O CO 
co'o* 
CO CM 



00 o CO o o 

CS O CO o o 
-^>C CO "5 

CO o'co 



CO CM C5 
CO — CM CO 
•>S<_CO CO_l~^00 

co'c'co'ic e^f 



o 

□c to 

CM O 



— o o 



g2 



C5 ^§ 

V >o oc* 



OC O 00 
CO o ^ 

oc ic c; 



o o 

C5 co" 



O CO U5 CM CO 

a> oo o o o 
o o •v»< 



) 00 ^ 



CO CO CO U5 CM 
CO C5 0_ t— _ 

— coo"«; 



CM ^ CO -xf 



• CMt^ 

: — " lo 

. «5 CO 



•^lOCOCMt^ I-- 00 00 »0 

CO ^ CO CD CO 05 ^ 

OOOOCUSCO ifl — — 

oo"-^oo"-r — cor^'uf 

C: CM CM — IC CO 



3 OJ O) 



II 



aa u a p 



.ox' 



I's-;.- silit: iit^i- 

: al§.|^ lllrr-S ll'^Js ^|t.f§ J:|ig 

H iiSg^ fel"^53 53 I Soil -cSii^ ^J:^J 



§2 



T3 3 

sli- 
ce 3 o : 

oH o ! 

X is J 



192 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE 123 — Vocational Rehabiliation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1961 



T 

Local Unit 


Total 




Being 




Being 


Surveyed: 


Closed: 


Number 


Kenabili- 


Followed 


Training 


Prepared 


Under Ad- 


Other 




Cases 


tated 


on Jobs 


Completed 


for Jobs 


visement 


Services 


Total State 


5 925 


1 491 


140 


963 


1 211 






Allegany 


142 


47 




29 


26 


28 


12 


Anne Arundel 


221 


52 


' 2 


28 


54 


70 


15 


Baltimore City .... 


2,505 


586 


71 


460 


518 


554 


316 


Baltimore 


541 


115 


12 


60 


154 


106 


94 


Calvert 


47 


11 


2 








q 
o 


Caroline 


64 


12 




8 


8 


19 


17 


Carroll 


170 


42 


' 5 


11 


28 


72 


12 


Cecil 


108 


34 




22 


21 


20 


11 


Charles 


85 


31 


" 6 


12 


10 


22 


4 


D or Chester 


94 


18 


2 


17 


20 


23 


14 


Frederick 


160 


73 




9 


30 


29 


19 


Garrett 


34 


6 




7 


13 


4 


4 


Harford 


74 


24 




7 


19 


19 


5 


Howard 


40 


14 




3 


8 


11 


4 




34 


9 


3 


7 


4 


7 


4 


Montgomery 


355 


99 


17 


64 


76 


79 


20 


Prince George's .... 
Queen Anne's 


408 


86 


10 


70 


94 


96 


52 


31 


14 




5 


4 


6 


2 


St. Mary's 


92 


22 


■ 3 


20 


16 


22 


9 




54 


15 




4 


12 


15 


8 


Talbot 


55 


17 




10 


7 


12 


9 


Washington 


364 


107 


' 3 


66 


59 


105 


24 


Wicomico 


200 


46 


4 


30 


22 


54 


44 




47 


11 






4 


14 


11 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Total 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


Characteristic 


Total 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


5,925 


1,491 


4,434 


Race 








White 


3,989 


1,105 


2,884 








Negro 


1,928 


384 


1,544 


1,547 


349 


1,198 


Other 


8 


2 


6 


1,117 


293 


824 










1,294 


358 


936 


Sex 








1,136 


278 


858 


Male 


3,879 


976 


2,903 


831 


213 


618 


Female 


2,046 


515 


1,531 








Marital Status 








71 


11 


60 


Single 


2,735 


588 


2,147 


340 


70 


270 


Married 


2,174 


661 


1,513 


910 


214 


696 


Other 


1,016 


242 


774 


2,084 


538 


1,546 








1,563 


400 


1,163 


Employment 








520 


153 


367 


HLstory (at Survey) 








192 


49 


143 


Employed 


443 


214 


229 


96 


35 


61 


Unemployed 


5,482 


1,277 


4,205 


34 


13 


21 


Never Worked . . . 


1,233 


266 


967 


115 


8 


107 


Worked at Some 














Time 


4,249 


1,011 


3,238 








Number on Welfare 








3,625 


834 


2,791 


(at Survey) 


697 


173 


524 


705 


190 


515 








498 


143 


355 










435 


146 


289 










275 


81 


194 










165 


45 


120 










222 


52 


170 











Characteristic 



Total Number 

Age 

Under 21 

21—30 

31—40 

41—50 

Over 50 

Education 

None 

1—3 

4—6 

7—9 

10—12 

H.S. Graduate 

13—14 

15—16 

College 

Unknown 

Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

Over 5 



* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,491). 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (4,434). 



Maryland State Department of Education 193 



TABLE 124 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered : 
State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1961 



. 


XT K f 

w um Der oi 


Average 


Total 




Clients 


Cost 




Expenditures 


Total Expenditure 


5,494 






$563,211 . 14 


Diagnosis 












1,731 


$19 


77 


34,216.73 


Psychiatric 


56 


46 


07 


2,580.02 


Psychological 


181 


45 


43 


8,223 15 




33 


68 


71 


2,267.55 


Surgery and Treatment 












94 


45 


05 


4,234 . 64 


Psychiatric 


28 


298 


25 


8,351.00 


Surgical 


135 


153 


27 


20,692.00 


Dental 


78 


131 


85 


10,284.08 


Physical and occupational therapy 


77 


112 


09 


8,630.58 


Prosthetic Appliances 










Artificial appliances 


161 


291 


89 


46,994.38 


Braces 


78 


71 


90 


5,608.06 


Hearing aids 


66 


199 


69 


13,179.63 


Glasses and artificial eyes 


120 


24 


29 


2,914.68 


Surgical appliances 


132 


77 


23 


10,193 79 


Wheel chairs, hand and power operated . . . 


26 


119 


76 


3ill3;71 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 










Hospitalization 


161 


312 


14 


50,254.73 


Convalescent home care 










Nursing care 


"io 


423 


07 


4,230^75 


Training and Training Materials 












95 


67 


98 


6,457.79 




firm 


250 


86 




Employment 


12 


228 


26 


2,739.08 


Correspondence 


40 


96 


57 


3,862.92 


Tutorial 


114 


64 


21 


7,320.38 


Training materials 


322 


34 


67 


11,163.19 


Maintenance and Transportation 










Maintenance 










Training 


394 


281 


13 


110,765.18 


Medical or physical restoration 


16 


63 


30 


1,012.77 


Placement 


35 


33 


78 


1,182.17 


Medical care 


6 


32 


17 


193.00 


Transportation 










Training 


384 


63 


60 


20,582.93 


Medical or physical restoration 


109 


18 


20 


1,983.44 


Placement 


75 


6 


51 


488.05 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) . 


113 


64 


05 


7,237.87 




6 


38 


48 


230.86 



194 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



■i 



Us 



Oh 

Q 

4^ 



0< 


ft 



if 



i1 

P30 



a> a 
a 3 



c cc o o 

§2§8 

— -H C<I 05 



O I- • S 



•CO lO 

• cc o 



O O »0 CO oo 



O IC (M 
CO CO O 
O 00 l>. o 



^00 t-_ <M_lO_-^_^(M__'»J< ^.CO 

•^jJt-Ccoco-H-u^od^'od cc-co" 



I CO in oi CO oo 



CO »C ■ C5 



(M CO CO 



CO lO ''S CO 

CO 00 02 05 

co-^'ooci 



COO" 
— < !>. C 

^ °^ ' 

l-^C^T'^CO— TlOOC'-^-HCOCC 
(MiOlOC^OCJiO C<t>OCO 
•^OOiOiCCO ^ CO 



! 03 <-< OO 

lo t~-r i>r oo 00 

oo-^t^oco-— com 

C2(MlO-^OCOOOOO 



TjH^io t^co lO -.j*^!--. >q-- r-.' _ 
oTodcoco^iood^ooosco 
r~ CO o CO CO CO t-~ 



oc CO 00 c^j^e^^- 
co CO 00* oc" r-T o" 00 

CO05O5t-<COC0'^CO 
OC^iO-^OCOOOOO 



o o S S 

»-*«5 oTco 
O o o 
cr. ^ 



■^OOOOOOlCCOt^O 
<MC5O<MC0C^0C»- 
t-»0->»<0: — COCO'- 



C <M 00 CO 



CO c «« CO CO in CO 

— u:5 CO CO <M 1^ 



CO CO 

co'co 
CO >o 



' -^ec to "5 
o 1-1 lOO oo 



o o t>- r>- »o »o 

oocor^ 00 <M ^ 

CT>0_oqoo (M_t^t^ 

c^Tt^t^od oo'o't^ 

>OC^COI^ l-lOO 

t-.MOico cao_-^ 
1-^ — ' (m" 
1^ (M CO 



OiCOOOOC<li— lOCO 
03 00 -q" CO 00 UO lO 00 



• o • ^< 



Ci — "C^ <N ^ OS 



§ 

MO 



a a' § 



o ft 3 



.ii^i-:!^ ill? jiiiIh-^Ih-^ii »ii 



■.s s I s ••- 

•I si " i a1 

oso^O^O 3 
r/1 „ . t; "O 

I'' 



_ 2. 57" 



' rn 7fj zn (-/:■ W 



I 



Maryland State Department of Education 



195 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1959-60 
General Fund Appropriation. . . . 

Special Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations and 

Additions 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Total Funds Available . . . 


$305 
488,970 
103,509 

* (1,366) 
3,408 
12,630 
7,399 


$2,100 
399,478 
13,215 

968 
928 
2,835 
3,393 


$2,494 
823,031 
205,894 

(1,775) 
10,135 
52,359 
27,669 


$11,098 
511,108 
107,570 

*(7,033) 
2,322 

23,076 
8,110 


$29,156 
1,503,531 
317,039 

1,222 
8,386 
80,376 
20,240 


$614,855 


$422,917 


$1,119,807 


$656,251 


$1,959,950 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Administration 












Salaries and Wages 


$67,832 


$45,212 


$96,095 


$72,721 


$178,516 


Technical and Special Fees .... 




2,024 


1,211 




3,000 




2,804 


2,160 


6,446 


2,43 i 


11,554 


Travel 


130 


352 


382 


640 


1,360 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 












Maintenance 


440 


810 


714 


644 


331 


Contractual Services 


1,907 


1,697 


6,138 


2,799 


5,256 


Supplies and Materials 


1,670 


1,325 


2,679 


1,453 


8,722 


Equipment— Replacement . . . . 


150 


842 


1,134 


340 


401 


Equipment — Additional 


466 


2,243 


555 




1,525 


Grants, Subsidies, and 












Contributions 


789 


1,242 


1,740 


371 


2,820 


Fixed Ch&r^es 


319 


190 


1,082 


663 


1 181 




$76,507 


$5o,097 


$1 18, 17b 


$8^,062 


$214,666 


Instruction 












Salaries and Wages 


$218,253 


$215,441 


$469,279 


$287,380 


$876,136 


Technical and Special Fees .... 


1,650 


1,895 


25,665 


7,620 


85,123 










50 


1,053 


Travel 


440 


1,047 


2,178 


1,129 


3,311 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 












Maintenance 


3,196 




1 ,493 


398 


2,130 


Constructual Services 


702 


937 


2,709 


1,694 


7,335 


Supplies and Materials 


5,524 


9,615 


16,250 


6,055 


19,586 


Equipment — Replacement. . . . 


4,270 




4,935 


3,336 


5,426 


E Quipment — \ dditionnl 


6 636 


27 955 


27 089 


10 145 


52 180 




$iS40,D71 


(fOCZ? OAA 

$^5o,o90 


$549,598 


$317,807 


$1,052,280 


Dietary Services 












Salaries and Wages 


$40,458 


$15,540 


$64,583 


$36,616 


$112,347 


Technical and Special Fees .... 




4,518 




2,527 


Food 


55,269 


12",624 


108,014 


38,614 


129,754 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 






















139 


Constructural Services 


459 


1,665 




2,281 


2,948 


Supplies and Materials 


1,432 


640 


3,591 


2,376 


7,203 


Equipment — Replacement. . . . 


506 










Equipment — Additional 






3,335 




2,242 


Total 


$98,124 


$29,209 


$184,041 


$80,341 


$258,366 


Plant Operation and 












Maintenance 












Salaries and Wages 


$102,942 


$37,101 


$136,497 


$80,323 


$200,127 


Technical and Special Fees .... 




634 


1,483 


Fuel 


21,470 


5,155 


10,908 


13,597 


31,491 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 












Maintenance 


1,243 


148 


946 


670 


1,891 




28,282 


14,100 


43,695 


31,154 


43,800 


Supplies and Materials 


5,290 


3,336 


11,511 


6.732 


25,074 


Equipment — Replacement. . . . 


3,046 


3,050 


228 


956 


5,460 




127 


618 


6,715 


518 


4,218 


Total 


$162,400 


$63,508 


$211,134 


$133,950 


$313,534 


Total Program Expenditures. . . . 


$577,702 


$407,704 


$1,062,949 


$614,160 


$1,838,846 


Refunds 


1,981 




4,422 


1.221 


6.909 




6,137 


1,250 


25,455 


14,437 


23,200 




4,070 




20,450 




23.850 


.\pplication Fees 


tl30 






7,301 


15,740 


Other Expenditures 


t52 




356 


118 


12,192 


Total Disbursements 


$590,072 


$408,954 


$1,113,632 


$637,237 


$1,920,737 


Unexpended Balance Re- 












turned to Treasury . . 


$18,284 


$6,079 


$1,874 


$4,388 


$12,380 


Balance, June 30, 1961 


$6,499 


$7,884 


$4,301 


$14,626 


$26,833 



* Denotes red figure. 

• Transferred to Genonil Fund. 

Note: Disbursements for Summer School at Frostburg, Salisbury, and Towson aro included under 
appropriate items in Instruction and Dietary Services. 



196 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education : Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation ; Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


RECEIPT 


S 





Balance Forwarded from 1959-60 . 

General Fund Appropriation 

Federal Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available 



$34,460 
896,351 
87,291 

'=(17,513) 
2,721 
21,789 
65,122 



$51,245 
462,888 
810,642 
* (35,450) 
3,598 



,937 



$1,090,221 



$1,296,860 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance. 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Departmental and 
Financial 
Administration 
$212,866 
12,451 
7,314 
9,466 
1,902 
17,431 
6,232 
1,399 
4,775 
9 

3,002 



$276,847 
Supervisory and 
Consultative 
Services 
$305,988 
34,246 
8,639 
17,597 
4,851 
8,165 
6,617 
3,441 
4,826 
3,992 
1,200 



$399,562 

Administrative 
Services 
$174,550 
19,476 
4,929 
6,861 
2,242 
5,602 
3,738 
4,004 
995 



$222,397 
Library 
Extension 
Services 
$6,152 
50 



34 
75,025 
134 

5,255 
525 



$87,175 



Administration 

$50,842 
16 
1,567 
1,639 
423 
259 
525 
522 
361 
3,735 
398 



$60,287 
Placement 

and 
Guidance 
$331,130 
9,239 
10,853 
18,161 



193 
3,417 
740 
1,782 
22,372 
28,126 



$426,013 

Case 
Services 



$ 581, 



$581,693 
Disability 
Determinations 
(O.A.S.I.) 
$67,531 
85,771 
1,488 
2,386 
173 
1,498 
28 
1,054 
6,968 
4,800 



$171,697 



* Denotes red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 197 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT— (Continued) 

Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


DISBURSEMENTS 


Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Total Program Expenditures 

Other Expenditures 


$985,981 
$20,783 


Specialized 
Facilities for the 
Blind 

$8,258 

$1,247,948 


Unexpended Balance Returned to 

Treasury 

Balance, June 30, 1961 




$1,006,764 

$56,464 
$26,993 


$1,247,948 

$18,170 
$30,742 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Loans lo Students — Title II-National 
Defense Education Act: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


receipts 


Balance, July 1, 1960 

Receipts: 

State Funds 

Federal Funds 

Total Funds Available. . 


$5,472 $480 

! 

832 1 1,242 
7,366 : 10,910 


$11,806 

1,740 
15,255 


$1,054 

411 
3,335 


$9,147 

2,911 
26,107 


$13,670 1 $12,632 


$28,801 


$4,800 


$38,165 


DISBURSEMENTS 


Loans to Students $12,838 

Balance, June 30, 1961 $832 


$11,619 
$1,013 


$22,550 
$6,251 


$3,398 
$1,402 


$21,895 
$16,270 



Note : This program accounted for as "Miscellaneous Funds" by State Comptroller. 



198 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 



SouKCE OK Purpose 



Bowie 



Balance, 
July 1, 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1961 



COPPIN 



Balance, 
July 1, 
1960 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1961 



1 General Construction Loan of 1951: 

2 Boiler plant and steam distribution . 

3 Library building 



4 General Construction Loan of 1953: 

5 Extension of main bldg. and Newell Hall . 

6 Equipment for gymnasium 



7 General Construction Loan of 1954: 

8 Equipment for residence hall 

9 Equipment for library building . . . 



10 General Construction Loan of 1955: 

1 1 Supplemental residence hall for 100 women 

12 Supplemental residence hall for 75 men . . . . 

13 Supplemental residence hall for 75 women . 

14 Purchase of additional land 



15 General Construction Loan of 1957: 

16 Construction of parking facilities 

17 Construction of library building 

18 Site improvements, including roads 

19 Planning for gymnasium 

20 Convert old library to student bldg . . . . 

21 Refurbishing exterior of Newell Hall. . . 

22 Construction of laboratory school 

23 Construction of incinerator 

24 Construction of auditorium-gymnasium . 

25 Site improvement and utilities 



26 General Construction Loan of 1958: 

27 Acquisition of land and properties . 

28 Land 

29 P]quipment new library 

30 Site improvements 

31 Construction of playing field 

32 Equipment new laboratory school. 

33 Installation of showers and toilets. 

34 Site improvement 

35 Equipment new laboratory school. 

36 Site improvement 

37 pjquipment for student center .... 

38 Equipment new gymnasium 



39 General Construction Loan of 1959: 

40 Acquisition of land 

Remodeling of old laboratory school. 

Replacement of existing boilers 

Construction, laboratory school 

Remodeling of main building 

Construction of dining hall 

Site improvement 

Laboratory school 

Construction of gymnasium 

Construction — president's residence . 

Utilities — president's residence 

Construction of library 

Laboratory school 



General Construction Loan of 1960: 

Equipment for new laboratory school 

Site improvement, new laboratory school. . 

Improvements to athletic field 

Equipment — dining hall and student 

activities bldg 

Purchase of land and improvements 

Remodeling old laboratory school 

Construction of roadway, sidewalks 

Construction of women's residence hall . . . 

F-^quipment for new gymnasium 

Construction of roads, walks, parking areas 
Modernize and extend fire alarm system. . . 

Extend electrical distribution system 

Rewire adm. and old campus school bldgs. . 

Construction of two exits— auditorium 

Enclose stairways in women's dormitory. . . 

Plans and specifications for infirmary 

Plans and specifications for add'l dininghall 

Survey and plans for add'l athletic field 

Road widening, sidewalks 

Equipment for new library 

Construction of laboratory school 

Grading of athletic area 



TOTAL. 



$285 

'771 
7,505 

578 



10,350 
16,324 



6,280 
9,059 
3,230 



431,677 
8,840 



$494,899 



$19,300 
50,000 
35,000 



$104,300 $413, 



*$285 



*771 



*578 



10,350 
9,800 



$6,527 



,524 



1,111 
9,059 
3,230 



5,169 



359,437 
8,796 



5.095 
2.591 
1,898 



(2.240 
44 



14.205 
47.409 
33,102 



$185,220 



$59.87 



19,017 



$10,659 $49,21 
5,9" 



261 
4,328 



281,111 
7,040 



*261 
3,785 



$38,000 
615.000 
25.000 



$378,263 $678,000 



278.711 
7.040 



2,648 



543 



2,400 



32,431 
155,060 



5.569 
459,940 
25,000 



$510,283 I $545,980 



* Includes the following amounts reverted: line 2— $120; 5— $349; 6— $74; 11— $531; 12— $397; 13— $535; 23— $32; 
49— $1; total— $2,449. 



33— $194:37— $216; 



Maryland State Department of Education 199 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1961 





Frostuurg 


Salisburt 


TOWSON 




Balance, 
July 1, 
lyou 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1961 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1960 


Addi- 
tional 
Availabl6 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1961 


Balance, 
July 1, 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1961 


1 

3 


$247 




$247 




















4 



6 


















$2,699 




♦$2,699 




7 
8 
9 


















1,279 






$1,279 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 


l',i76 
1,175 




*l',i76 
♦1,175 




$2,490 




$895 


$1,595 






.... 




15 


























16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 


582 






$582 


6,666 
9,501 




6'.666 
439 


9,062 


9,382 
183!553 
177 




/,oOO 

183,547 
*177 


1,499 

6 


26 
27 
28 
29 


43,994 






43,994 


















30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 


12,966 
194 




12"424 
*194 


476 


12.954 




12.923 


"ai 


3l',i66 
32,944 




12.i52 
21.041 


18,948 
1 1 Mi 


39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 


305,63 i 
50,000 
8,156 




263, i 89 
41,520 
3,131 


42,442 
8,480 
5,025 


337,203 
44.947 
3,500 




332,66i 
♦44,947 
3,500 


5.202 


102 
50.000 
185.548 




3,469 
146.660 


102 
46,591 
38.888 


53 
54 
55 
56 


























57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 




$20,000 
60,000 
35,000 
60,000 

425,000 


13,831 
54,900 
5 

50,352 
101,938 


6,169 
5,100 
34.995 
9,648 
323.062 




$3,i66 

75.000 


2,969 
2.404 


isi 

72,596 




$25,666 
15,000 
40,000 
13,300 
22,000 
1 Ran 

3,000 
5,000 
25,000 


25.666 
736 

7.511 
10,290 
18.813 

1,034 

2.62! 
23.889 


14.264 
32,489 
3,010 
3,187 
566 
3.000 
2,979 
1,111 


76 


$424,055 


$600,000 


$544,082 


$479,973 


$416,595 


$78,100 


$406,078 


$88,617 


$496,784 


$149,900 


$466,862 


$179,822 



200 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



tZ}>- 



0.2 



oS 



1 I 



S (3 



2 o 
OH 



• O ^ 1-1 to OS 1-1 l« 



■"I'M -r-^TfeCCC 'tMCOC^C^l CO t -5j< CC 



in cc o Tj" CO 



I in ?c 01 >o ^ M T»< in (N 



CO OS t~ t- CO 



ec OS c- t- 



3 o a> 

«^ S S 

=3 c 05 ca 



01 <D O <Q 



CJ O C c« ■ 



ass 

■Hi 
sis 



«-i I- rt 

Tt lO <U 
rt C5 o ' 



ca c8 Qj ■ 



be bfl M be 

.S.SWW 
^^.2.2 



Maryland State Department of Education 



oaioooo ooooot-oo 

COt-Nt-a> C0(N«D00t- 



^ O 00 o 

05 1-1 in 



■t o ec CO 00 (N c~ 
i-nMOJOsoo cr. •"toic-* 



t- in c~ ;d o 

t- 00 iC ^ 
rl" O C~ t- 



•.t-^rioifsoi MOiioift 



rJ<Mi«05eO -^NasNiO 

00 00a>O(N (N^OOON 

oooo't-" »-r«*''-^''co <N 
^ «c ec 



Tl<O>N00;O lOt^OOOO OONOSOO 

t>o^ioecTf T-^ ic«D^in 05^ t> (n in 



eo oo'XJTrTi'io oo i-h oi lo ai «-! i> i-i co c- i-h lo t-i/5^oo 

05 cci-i^otDT}" 00500^00 OT}<ot-t~ irtco^DeO'-i t-«ioot- 

o_t>a^_eo_ec ^i_ooo^n«o oo__eo^a5_<N 05 «D_irtOo>c<i_ '"l.c^.®^. 

o> TTNco •"ji'tH (-Tnco'c^'-h ecrH-<te<f K5o"r-rrHr-r r-TineC'-r 



(NeO<D(NO OOrHOCC 



rj< if5 t- r-( 
O CD OS 05 
CO ^ O 



i-HOoecooec ONt-t- 

CCtHQOOOtJi ooooc- 

CO^(N --t^ODS^ CC 10 <N t- 
CO <N •"-Tci'T-r 



lOiOTf-Hoi ooeooo«cD eoa>ecc<ic£> (N'-hooj* t-t>ect- 

cDio(Mai-^ ooco^CJ— ( ^ootco; ^xm— iic t-cDt--<t 

(N-^__O_C0 00 CD O^i-H CD^Tt "^.00 ""it^.^i 

oocrrc"c"c^ (N CDCO'* ccc^^-^^ cSoSi>S^7i (No'co'cc 

(M ^ lO ^ 10 ^ 



T}<iftTf(Nio cDt-i— icDco xeocDOJC^ <Occim<N'<* ot-oocc 

t- t-O5«-^(r0 C<J00t-CCD OCOrfOliN '-<Ot--<1'C£) OOOiC—i 



' 

0_C£5^SC Ift ■ 

x'-H cc cc ! 

<N X Tl< 



VAJ L - ' — s*^ • ■ _ _ _ 

(N eo^ o_oo o .-H CO CO X 



ic N in X t> 
CO ic ec 
eo 05 ON ec 



CD^CO-fX 

X eo X 
c<f in Lneo'eo* 



t~ (N X 1 



m(NXeoN 
10 10 1- CO o 
X t> oi^eo eo 
(M't-'r-reo'iN 
eo 



N m M 



05t-a:0(N INiOt-O^ 

eo ^ o rH c<J o 05 Tj" 

r)-CO-<l>X-* COONt-M 



10 «0 txj; ■ 



1 ^ O t> CD 



o-.eoococD ^inomcD 
looec-^in t-ioinoco 

^"^*i>roo co" eo'eo'co" ■>!}<" 



N X 10 X 
CDX«0(N 

<M eo CD t- 



! -J a; flj 



o o _ 

£ e 



S o c 
g * c 



T »- 



^'fc-GrtJi 'gfc'S^c gc^^S £ 

=:Cojc<Jrt cats 5^=0 £ c9 rt o a; ^-CS^g rt 

<j«i;mpQO uoouQ feOWWti! Scuc^rg h 



202 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



o 
1-t 


Total 
Number 


of 

Different 
Teachers 


a> 




Combined 
Elem.-Sec. 


00 


Schools 


Secondary 


t> 


Number op 


Ele- 
mentary 


(£> 




Total 






Secondary 




•ILS 


Other 
Elementary 


CO 


MBER OP Pup 


Kinder- 
garten 


(M 


Nu 


Nursery 






Total 










LOCA] 





t- vn a> t- OS 

00 05 t- 
iH lO O 



(M CO 0? W (N ' 



CO in CO o CO 



00 CO iH CO • 



CO a> 10 05 0^1 

«C t> t- 05 



■rHOOl • 00 

O CO • iD 

th CO CO • eo 



05 Tj< -tf T)< eo oiOTtire 
ioocoooTt< ecoiTtTi" 
eoeoooO'-H coooeo 



eoooeot- • ?£>eoooio 
CO 1-1 a: co_^ • o_a5_ co__ 
vreco" co" 



t- 00 CO 
c- r-^ in 

CO a: CO 



■ t- 00 CO ire 00 

• ^ lO o 



■ OS 05 ire 

. ID ^ 

t- ire 



ire CO ire ire CO 

:£) <X> »-l O «£> 



a> 00 cTi » 
ooooox 

00rHi-lTj< 



OCO O 05 

CO O rH O 

05__'-i co_ 
05* ire 



'go 

3 (D aj 



fJJ i-N 



t-i y w ~ 



•3 e 

-Soy 



»-l 0> 00 05 CT5 
00 O l> «D 

i-H 05 ire 



ire ■«* 05 



OOCOTfO 
CO 0> CO 05 CO 
«£! 00 O 



05 CO 00 00 CO 

ire o «D t> 

CO 00 t- CO >— I 



■ T-i ire 05 

■Or-(T}< 
■--I CO 



o ire ire r-< 

CO 05 O CO 
CO t- CO 



CO coeooo5 



■o>co^ 

• t> CC «£> 

■ CO 00 



O5coo5'^eo ococDO 
c-c-t-eoixi eooirHoo 
C5irer)<«£>i-H rrooire 



3 <D 0) 

r 

o o 

- £ £ w 



s" c 2 5 i: fc- 1- w 



Maryland State Department of Education 



203 



«0 ■<i' a; to 



CO 
cccc 



eo 1-1 « 



X t~ CC • ?D N 
X C "-J- r: • iC CO 

N X '-^ ■ a:_^<N 



■ • uo o 

•35 • ICM 



• ^ LO • X a; 



X X >0 ■ X 35 -CM 

O -H CO ■ '-' ^. • X 

«c-^3;co__ ■ eo__o^ -^i 

r-T lo"-^"" Co" 



35 irt iC 

eo^eo 



o c 



a> 0) o ca ^ 



S Oh 0*73 0! 



X t- o 
uo m 



CO -r-IOt- 



ijoco ^co; 
IN ox 
CO 



CO CO OJ 35 

«5 o ,-Hcoeo 

T-l o o o 



^ ■— I 35 O 

- o — o 

O -co 35 35 



• O i.O o 

• irt c o 



«oa>35X 

OOrH lOr-l 

CO t> CO 



•O5C0VO 

• coo-* 
t- in 



«) O O 35 
X35C0 'O 



C — X- 
X X 

o cc 



X o 

CO X 



■^•^^ COCOOt- ■ «£!35«C! 
•XCDCO OO — CO ■ iffliftO 

■'-I'-i cox»-ico- i-HTt 



■ 3 <ii a> 



7) J .S: ij'p'p 



Et. •■Z! a;S u-t-i-i- 

:=> £fc-c«^ "S^H^c = 

ty; =:csso3ea esesojjso ■^''JS^.^^ <^ 

- <<2:«(j uuooQ &,cKls:id S 



■ W 05 



00 n S o 
&£ be b U 

£££££ 

« •»— H-O 



204 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



^3 tart 



a 
s 


u 

.a 

3 

I 

s 

PQ 



S >> 

o 



55 iniO Tl- ^ K 



o;£!-(^P3oa; • oo n« cc ec o « (N 'S- 



O O in CD 35 

cc CO a; a: o 



1-H OS 00 t> O 03 

ec Oi « J5 00 Oi o 



eg 
13 -25 
C »3 



z _^ 

^ I 5 

< : y 



■"SI ec 



;c o UCi o 
CO cc 1-1 ifl 

X eg u5 



O 05 t- rf 
XiOINOl 



»oa>-^c<ixo 



02'"' 



> 
S 

o 

• • 



C ?J 















s ■ 






till 


tal 






.To 


.To 


e2 



= S 



sSrtrtrt_,c-:=2j3a;c;J!nxr: 

OOOOwcwtzJtzit/^ccccwwc/jcc 
* 



c 

" s vfi; 'So 



rt 



O £ 

U 



J O O 



rt 

:2brt 



^^1 



-^1 

111 
SI'S 

rt 



fa 



005 

N in 



Nt-iOa5X-H X05 iflMNO 
X— 'OCCIN^ -thO •»-( Cg!£ 



o; o 

O (N 



• O krt 01 !£> • N 



05 •omx5D«oi«a5 
10 oeccdNeg-^irt 
CO •i-(Tteo'*'-iN«£i 



ec ec ec o c- 

O liC X 

x^MXin-^^ 
ec-T r-* 



ao -co -us -o • •->!}• X X t- o in 05 
«> -x -ta ■ -^ONC-ecosxt- 
t> •,-( -N • -.-HTtececo 



«5 o o 
•t- NOt- 

•■>* eoa5'-i 



■xxo 

CO o 
(NXO 



05 »n (N ' 

X 



asosovftxcjcoinTf 

t-ii5Oe0«Dr-IM-<tC0 

05(M.- (■^feom'-iecx 



woeomx O5t-t-05ec-^oxo505inr-(0i©ioa5t- 

t~X'^«Ct- t>Om^05Cg!OC-iOXC<IXO>OXt>N 

10 -*__x in 5D ■^^'-'^x CO ec -^^w ^ o^—i m 



«DtJ<,-I O C O «£> «C 0> N XCJ 
coot- inOt>^X(NC0Nt- 
COWJi t- OS ^ X -"t "-I t- X »-l 




Maryland State Department of Education 



205 



l; 3 te on 



« o a: X ^. ^ t r: 



73 



m ■ oo • -eoco -h 

oo- c<5ec- ot- 05 



e<5 eo lO irt 

O O N 



.;oo ■ -Tfooeooooeo^ocjoiecai O5aic-o->t c^Jt- -js 
•-^co • • oi w -"t ifl o eo o 1-1 TT im -"j* c<i as cc-^ c^i 



loio oo 



eot-a5000FHeox>ino-«i<aiet5t>eooooot-eo c<i«o-^o'.£c-oiC(mc; 
oO'-i^eoeo^oooTi'ooecooacecc-Mnccai xo-.t-o-^-^iMt-j; x 



u5 u5 mm 
00 W CO ?o 
a> 05 eo CO 



z _ 
P ! 2 



5 



;^ =^ g « ^ 




. o . c 



T5 ^ 5 R 



172 . 



^ ^ « 4^ « 

K c/: CO CO 



8^ 

2w 



o c o a' V 
~ t^r .« a; 



•x-^Tt;© eceo 



o eo 50 in t- ■'a< r-i o •«i< ?o u5 X o oi CO so i-H eoc 

— iMMi-l M'-l ri ,-1 COIN Ml 

eo 



•eo OS 
■xo 

•r-IM 



1< O ifl X 
X M T — I 



eo »rt X « OS eo 
oioooeojo 

r-< (N (M IN 



• ic o; O o • eo eo 

• (NX -OS »H 



■eoeo^xioxiiot-'-i'Hineoo 
-i-Ht-cDiaeoMXC^tooiifl-^t- 
■ ,-1 ^ a: ^. X otoMOJ 



O; M Tf M 



inicxxosiffl Xrf Tta5T}'i.oiot-oa>»-iOeoo-Hxio;omc~---Hia<cisb- 
eooooeot- ^ -^t lo as o lO as -h 50 eoeo x so useoM x t- « os io-h ,-i 
eoM'^MMM eo u5 eoNMX lOO .-H i-H M ""t ^ as a: eo X ^ eo in 



Si 



C b. u 

o s Ji -li 



in c 
No 

c u 
n bfi ai 

= 1.-= 

: S s 



> ^ J, j> ^ 

c C X X 7: c-" 



a >. >. 

E- r: 



5 ^ c 



a t >>— . . . < < K ^ O 



— ai: 
Jt;.— ■ 

C u >• 

ii'c'ii' 
CXT3 



3 3 3^ 



O 7: 7: 7: 7: X X X 7: X X 



:S •£ J 

xxxx^> 



03 



206 



s i c b 



«3 g o S3 



0- ' i >> 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



I 



O •••'?)<• • 

O ■ • (N • • 

«o in 

O lO 



lis 

P t; "oi .5 o t: 
PQ 



2-^ 

fit 



CAM 



0, i • 

3 o • : c 



<1 



33 O 



, a-0 

In a^i^ 

9' , 



c 



3-7 CO, " 




in w 



• in CO 'O 



• lo ^ N «o eo • • 00 1- 
■ c<J T-i «o in ■ ■ 05 in 



«oooooo oso • -in • -o inmann 

OONNW • rH • -in (N-H^t- 



■t>00 -CC -SD 



«o coowoo o o »-i ;o ^ r-( t> o in o as t- in t- r-( o 

« OONOJeO OS eg 05 — I 00 N in (M(N^(Nint-N(N 



«Nt-00^ 



inint>c<i"<s'<DNOinc<JC<i'Hininc<J©o 

00 00«ONt>r-(COiX>M00 05^'^N0500> 



rQ ^ ^ 



is 73 
3 - _ 

c 

° S P 



c5 



2.Sf 3 c.£o 
^g^S>§"c« 



■-go 



'Wh^z cos 



3 £ o; 

' 03 C « 



o ? 

la 



O 2 



lllli 



> c 



0) C o 



a „ - 

O^H g 



II 

wo 



III 

es o-a 



a; K . 



3Z O O O 

Z o 



>» 

1 S CO 



73. 



CJ a, L _r 

^ S3 e 'o T3 

t O O 

y rt i § C 

2 a> 0) 5 



ceo 



Maryland State Department of Education 



207 



! 1« lO CO r-f r-l 



o«Oeo 



oo ■ 
oo<o • 

ci 



oo V> 00 • -wo «OC^O'<J< O -oo • oo 00—1 • 
N<N ->i< iH • • IN O'itOJTf to -Wi-I ■ (M(N t-Ol • 
1-1 (N 



oo 'cj* O -CO 



00 -tccn 



3 6 °^ti-g <n 



OO 00 Tji«DN00 00 «D(N«O00 -"f O O tC O r-( r-l N r-l « «0 00 05 «> W W «l tJ" eO 00 

ecec m n—in «o oo-^ooio «otj<ioioc^ coeo ooo— irf «c »o o us r-i o ec i-i 



Eh 00 

: >» 



a y 01 



•u.g i>n3 

S o 2i o.s « 
fa 



Q a; JifH 

W 



O <D O CC 
- O M o 



•J5 



|§2 
2 > 



H 2 act: 
2 -s CO ee a; 
o<!<fQ W 



III- 



coo 

< M 

« S ? h - 



= :Si=^ £--5 £ c £ 

"<D3eJci3aiO>>n!c9 



•iHON 
•OOt-M 



• 01 t- in t- 



OJ (M O (M 

CO eo o •'It 
r-ieo 



rHOStOUJO 
»0 Tj" (M (N iCi 

(MrH 



rH M to imo c- Ti< 05 «c oowoomt--^ 
-a* 05 ifl CO 00 «o « eo 'i' Tj<cooa>(N 



03 c9 <D 
J3 bO-C 



0) O 



iSx: 



r-« 

5 CT3T5 



• D«~ TO c3 CO C 



O' 

w o, 

0; :« c; 



X ^3 j= . 



3 -C Ph 



3 3 

CIS pj 



i" o c bo's 



103:7:0 , ^ 



i_ c 3 =* 

^o^ t; 

S e C 

!5H «Ui 



208 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



OS feiS g g 
Eh 



21 fe? 



O u 



a> 00 WON «« 

o «0eC05 (N iM 

eo -ot- 00 - 00 TjiTit 

03 -Oj-I -Tf 

N 1-1 



•OCl ccoo 



9. «« 



<N O 00 t- O Tj< U5 1050005 <Ji y-i O t~ .-H O i-l in 05 O OO© t> t- «D 5D 05 CO O <0 N 

O O .-I rf Tf (N C<Jr-(OeO t-eC>0 CO -"t N C<1 'S' i-<eCOO IM (M ICiO VOMOeOO 

r-( r-( ,-1 (MM ,Hr-( r)< r-l ,-( (N 



H 3 

CIS 
O 

5U 



M • C C 

o c a> 0) 



Jill 



■ a; 

S mS_3 



: t c 



■Si, >> 
III 



=5 



_0! 



us 



>» 

O 3 

e o 

Eh 



o 



2 ^ - 

3 C -Kl 



O . o 

H • 2 



-COS 



N X m 00 <N in o 00 o: CO «o eo r-i co 



« r-l ,-1 ,H 



00 • ■ w 00 



OlOOSOO N 
00 



ict-o5ooot>c<i«o«Dm 
TtoMO(xinCTfi>r-i 

T-( -ct in rH 



C 00 t- 05 i-l O iH 

50 N t- ec ffo «£> 05 



N Tj" o in 
(M (M CO m M 



^ o 

.1 :^ «^ 



3 

s 

o 

•5 J3 c;E-i - o 



o . i^wx 2 
o .727^ c 2 

: W J; 5 



5J 0) 



o 




.SEh S 2 o 

M— a. o o 
rtWj2 o o 



c« w t: 3 

U CO O --^ 
^gTS C w a> 



121! 

■ < ° §^ 

?^=M 

'"''3 o rt"© 
PQP50U 



Maryland State Department of Education 209 



Tj" -^f o: t- -"T M 



T-i a; Tj" 05 ifl 



t-osecmec Ti<^;D-<t-<t mwoj^o; 
»a-!feOrHio Tf U5 Tj" Tf Tt Tj. ^ e<5 



e<5 o ci o 

-«1< lO -"t 



eclooot-o 50ecMt-0i osrHt-ooc- 



M «J 

t- Oi 



It-t-lflr-l I0«0 0i0 



' X c o eclrt • 



^ lO t- ec N ire >n 
^ ^ -T in 00 r-i 00 o o ^ 



050006-0 Ti-osnt^Dire osoiwojire t-wooooM irecco^ 



«5 0-. -H o 

ire '^s ec 
ire c ire 



ire o 05 ire ere 
ire o 00 ire 
'I' in C<l o: — 



Oi — "tfovto — oireirc^ -<t>Ort 
;cc---(NO xrcorto ^o-ho5 
CJire_^x^^_ac o__o__Tf_« no-j_x_o_ 



<M o^-j'-'^D ereoocc-u. ..-^^.^^ 
— ■ -~ ^ ^ ■'oo'^ec-^ eco5ireooo5 



CO O t— — w w i.'^ ^■ 

i-H05'*-*05_ NOt~t-t-_ 

inoooTo'cc o'oo'jo'ire 
1-H CO 00 



^rT0;c£05 T-iNtcocc^ 

, c- CO t- ^ 00 o 05 00 05 1- 

'V»o5ireooo5 O5^oeo^ 

_Ttio,-<_o t-.'-t"^<£>,o_^ 

fo'->*'ire t- D5 xoiamia-^ 



(N ■'t 05 
t- 00 (M 

00 00 1> '-^^ 
co*t-''orire 



i<£>^oire«o oot-^05cc oo5N-<t-* ireirewire 



^ c<J ^ 50 
N — . t- tT --I ^ 

o: 05 o 't ire ire 



CO cc 05 

-<t 00 1- a; i< 



05 o vre 
o 05 o 00 
ire o o i>j c<t 



t-050t-'^ ON(N«0 

osoireccoo t-cc^^ 



OS ere t- N 00 



05 05 05 Mt-ooireo (N-^-^05-rt< oo500t- 



ire ^ c<i 'H 
cfi to ec » 
osireooeoc- 



■<j< «c ire 00 
o5 N ire o 
ire c- <;o ere ere 



-^ireoireere t-ecoi'-'O 
ooc^t-rH -"^c-c^iirein 
t-t-cceco: o:ere — cc-^ 



! 00 <N (N ire ire ■'t ec 



oiONcoN c<io;oec 



CO •<i' !£> ^ -"t t- -J* t- ire ri< ire o Tj* Tj< ec cootoereoo 



o eo t- 00 
« ere t- o: 00 

00__!C (N 00_N 

ire-''"oo'"ire''i<" 
r-i ;o X 



t- 05 <N O O 

o t> o ire ire 
-1" ire -<t ec o 



CC0050X --iNireo5io 05(Nco?o 
o M (N t- cr. CO t- CO (M -vis o: o ire ire 
COt^-^iCM c-.t^oco ot-co-^ 



•go 



•OTJ 



3 i)X 



O i; J3 C4 C i) 



a) O C 

§a< bo 

Mo, e 2 



5 CO S I- 
3 o 



. c ire 




■= c .5 ire < .i: ..5 «^ z . = o 
--.c = c cc: cf c 



= ire D-^a 3 - = 



c c 



210 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



oooot- oioosooc ooooo ooino 
t£>i-It-OTj< t-eciMcn'* io(Neot-t- ooo>a>'* 

r-l«>(N ^i-H 



00(N0 



O 05 

t- lo OS o o CO 
o T-H CO eo t- 



o in o vf5 



irtOUiOCO OOiOCOO OrJ<Tj<0 



(N OOOOr-t O00t-Or-< -^ooot- 



t~ Tf-rftt-eON 
t- OOOSOOIO-* 
Ifi tH CO CO o 



iC CO Oi t- 



■>S"coOt-io toeoost- 



N ooooo ooNOco osoiftoo ooinNo moooo 

U5 (NOSOOSOOS OSCOOitOUi t- CO W r-l lO 0> <D CO 00 CO O 00 

lO -^OOCOmt- O 00 T}< N '-lOOCOlOt^ ifStOOOrHOs 00 t- 00 tH 

C0C-05t> ^(^^^r-^ CO CO rl lOCO ^ COi-Ht-I 



o o a: o «D 



ICMO OOOOt- 



00 ^00(MOCT> t^COOOOC^l -^^t-iCX> 
O t-OliOnt- t-00«^O 5I500C-CO«£i 



0000-* O3^C0Oira ^OOOX 

oot-'e<joo«D o^crxNO oirfcowio 

i-H CO CO 



OOOOO o»rtocr> 



vn -"t o o 

X00O5 1O 



000:00 iOOCO(Mlf5 COOOOU? OOOr-lO iCOSOOS 

O:iOTj<00Ci> t-OOtfNN OmeOt-N 0^<NMOi t-05U?C0 

Oi^OiCOOS <XO<Z>xOy-t ^0-»f5£>t- 0:!0»(NW OOOOr-IN 

(MOSinOi *C^N'-lrH CO'-HCO'-I t-Tf tH eON'-^ 



oooiOifl incoiflNvo iftoiaoo oolceoo oosTfo: 



05eococo«D t-t-coNX 

(MOSiOiC^ (MOlOOi-HO 



OOOOlO ot-oo«o 

(N^OS'-ioo o:eoo«£>05 

.-I r-( t- T)< lO CClO^X<£> 

CO 10 «5 rH r-l 



(Nt-os-^eo 
<-< ^ 1-i (=> 

--I -<t (N 1-1 



oooolO ooooo 



OOrfO 



>^(C-^-^ COOOO— tiO 10 (M 00 (M 
< t- N O i-H t- tT! C- 10 00 1-1 1- 

I N r-( 05 N iH 



000500 inomc<iiH usoioous ooifleoo oosooos 



•"tocooit- 

t- U5 CO ^ 



CD rH CO 00 00 
05 U3 05 05 CO 
-HrJieOCOCO 



OOOOiOOOt- 
(N 00 C- ^ 

CO rH CD CO 1-1 



OJCOUSCDrH 

T)<C0CD'4<00 

CO 00 ^ M rH 



r)< OSeO 00 

t>»rtoeo 

i-it-TjiiN 



-go 

^ Q> 0) 

tu £2 *^ 



(m «H y w t 



oj 0) o ca _ 
2 c3 03 o <u 



DOC 

oO<J 
M oi r- « c; 



6 ^ 



^ o w 



O Oi O i« O lO i-O 



r-l 10 



OOSOlOOlOm 



c o: o U5 o 1.0 u? 

' .-I 1-1 rH N M r-l 



o 05 o 10 o m in 

■<f 1-1 ^ (M (M 1-1 



-go 



t- Qj 5 
— S-s-S o « o 

M M Cv n M Sk. 



to CO 

a 



si 

«^00 



•p 



X o 



Maryland Statc Department of Education 



211 



Pi 3 



sic 



l-i §"1 

o 



2§.S2 
o M.ti 0) 

? g 

Oh 



CO 



00 OOOOlO 



inooo 

<C00rH 



ooooo 
eo o in T}< 



ooooo 



oooo 
■^f oi m t- 



oooot- 

00 o 00 OS lo 

OJ tH -.SI T}< r-1 

CO i-iNecoo 



eo o c- in o 



ooooo ooooo t-OkflO 



cc o o CO 

l> lO <N 

in in 



0000-* 



oocooo 
ini> CDC- 



ooooo 

Oi t- ;0 



ooooin oooo 



CO oooin^c oinooo 
in comT}<-^T-( T^cC'^'-^'H 



(NOinoo Nininoo ooooo 



ooooo 



ooooo 



ooooo 
CO CO — I 



ooooo oooo 
oo5Di-ica,-( r-in<NC<i 



oioinoo ineoovoo 

in00«O<Dr^ rH-rf'^lN.-l 



o o in o in 

>n r-l ,H 



^ in in iM o o 



m o o o o 



in o o o in 



05 in in in in 
'tinr-icq^ 



in in in o 

rl XI CO T-l 



in o o o o 

rH CO C- -rf ^ 



ooooo ooinoo ooomo oooo 



3 « « 

=3 c cs cs CIS es ca <y.c o 



r c4 es o o 



Joe 



i2s 

•SCO) 



.3 m.^^.^ . 

ft .5 g c 

1 Sill 

w m 

J ^-S $ 2 £ 

cms 'O'V'V 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



^35 



t- CO O O OS 

o CO CO T)< in 

t-^ 

00 OO^oTtN t>iN* 

CO o ?D t> 

iH (M ?D 00 



00 'sD T)< N in 

ifS O IC o 

o eo lo t- CO 

no CO CO ^ 00 



00 C<J i-l lO «5 
C- OiCDOl lO 

00!»-<t 

t-'ui i-T^D e^ 

00 C- CO OS Tjt 



e<i c- 

Oi 00 00 i-H 
00 tH C-^Oi^OO 

eo'"ooo"t>N'' 
CO t> if5 as t> 



00 »mrt 00 

O U5 O 



Eh 



CO r-IC<JC005Cg 

t~ e<ico«DrHoo 

lo t>o_-*o^eo__ 

ci (jTo'eot-'in 

lO OS <£> o C<1 

o c<i o CO 



CD lO CO « 



"30t-0t> 
lOCOOOOOt- 

'teocO'Ht- 



oeoeorf ^ 
o eo^Tij^oo Tt" 

O CD C<1 CO 



t> inoi^oo^^ 
CD oo'"r-^co■ 
e<^ CO CO CO 



^2 § s 



,015 


CD 00 X CO 00 
« 00 00 00 Ol 

o^.-i_^-<t eo_^io_ 


icco m o c- 

CD O CD O CO 

a> lo ^ 1-1 


CO 00 00 O 00 

o 00 1- 00 

C0_^O CD^^Ol^OO 


t> CO CO eo --1 

CD CO rt< O 

os^oo^^ai^^cD eo_ 


^00 CD CD 

in 00 1> X 

CO CO t> t-_^ 


CO 


.-H cD'i-To'eo" 
CO CO CO 00 00 
CO 


co'co"-* lo'eo' 
O' o 1-1 CO ^ 

T-^ CO eo ^ rH 


i-Too oo'co'cd" 

CO en t- CD t> 

CO CO ^ 


t-^oo"©*-^"©" 

OS lO 00 00 0^ 
lO lO 


o* CO* coco" 
oi '-i 03 eo 

T-H rl 




^"co" 






Co'rH 




&e- 












eo 

U5 
00 


• • i«eo • 


. . .t> . 
■ ■ ■'^ ■ 


o -co • • 

O -CD • • 
CD -(X • ■ 


oo • • • 
cot- ■ ■ • 

T)< 00 • • • 


• lO • • 

• 00 • • 

• in • • 


$391, 


: CO in ; 

. .COCO . 


; :oo"~ : 


oT :t> : 


123, 
27, 


'.^ '. '. 

.CO . . 



3 cs 
no cj 



O 05 rH CO T-l 

CO t> o o t> 
in Tj" eo th eo 



t— ^ eo t> oi 

•-(t-XCOCO 

CD CD CO CO CO 



COXCDO^iH 

ooincDt- 
oi Til in in o 



O 03 CO o 

t-t>cDeox 
eo_^o_eo eo co 
00 co' 



t- T)< ino 

inrHOiCO 



X eo CO CO t- 
in CO in CO r-i in 
c-__ 

a> aro'inx'rH 
CO eo • 



t- a; eo CO 

CO X CO o 

cocooeo 



CTJ 



in > 



o CO CO CO in 



iH OS rH (N 

in o> t~ CO CO 

Oi 00 CO 
-"ft-* Co't-h 



CD in Tj< X 
X OS eo in 
CO cr. o 



«.£^ CD 

Is o.> 



o in in o CO in 
X in in CO CD 
Tf t- CO ^ 1-1 CO 



omin^o ininooin oinoom oxmo 
incocDCDin com^eo-* co-'^'^oco aieoooi 
coinTtcoic in Tjt ,-1 Tf T-H cococoeoco coco-^co 



t: fi «^ c 



o eo o OS -<t eo 
.-I xinxcoco 

^"in t-'x^co 

O CO ^ CO 

in CO t- eo 



O t- 05 t~ t> 
O CO CD CD CD 

o Ti< CD CO 



eo CO t- eo t- 
eo CO CD eo CD 
rf CO in t- CD 



t-cooeo'* 
eo CO o eo 

Os^fH CO CO 

00 00 in CO*" in 
a CO CO CO 

CO ^ 



inoeoeo 
in in X eo 
■r}< in in in 
co'i-Tin in 
CO a> eo 



rj< in CO CO o CO 

eo rH in o rj< 

eo__ eo^^O'^oo rH rf 

t-" eo'eo^o'co'-H 

eo Tj" CO CO X 

lo t- Oi eo CD 



o in X »H CD 
.-H oi CO oi ^ 

X_^.-H -.t 

^'o'co'o'oo 
eo t- t- X 

t> X O ^ CD 



t> CD Ol 03 
CO CD CO CO 

O^O_-*_C0__rH 

^*rH eo^t-'co' 
in CD CO oi 

r-< X CD CO CO 



ot-oxco 
i-H in rj< eo 
ri<_in X a^^ 

in CO X CO CO 

t-_^CO Tt" t- t- 
CO'Tf 



r-( int- o 
03 1- ■<4' 
CO X c- 
oToTco''^'" 

X t- CO T)< 

eo in o in 



eo r-i CO 
CO in o t- -rr 
x_x_x^oo 

co'co'^'rir^' 
■*t^X^CO 

T-T'* co" 



^ in o in 
in eo in 'H ^ 
t-_^Tt t-^co_^in 
eo'oo 00 t-'o" 
CO Oi CD o c- 

rH CO CO CO 



CD o in CO o 
o; o in i-H CO 

C0__O_C0_^C0__rf 

o"'# -^""rfreo" 

O CO CD T-i 03 

r-( CO 



in o CO o X 
^ in CO ^ ^ 
o t> t- t> co_^ 
co'd'cc-T-r^'" 
CO in o CO 

O O: rH r-l ^ 



-Tf COXO 
t- -H -^CO 

CD CD CO 03 

in ^"oTco' 
.-( ^ X in 
.-Hinco^ 



t- o in o o o 

X o t- in o 

r-J_ 05__t-_^in K! o 

t-* x"co''o'"co'"in 

lO CO C CD X 

CO CD t> CD 



O CO o o o 
03000 

0__l> CO^^^rH 

in a3''i-rt-'"oo 
03 Ti< o3 03 eo 

r-l CO CO CO 



03 o oo o 
-rf o o in o 

C0_^O_^O^CD o 

00 x'^f in t-" 

COXC-^Tjt 

CO rH CO eo 



o o o o 
rf in in o in 
in t- CO c- x^ 

-h"oO co'-rfo* 
CO t- CD r)< X 

eo^x_^^ CO rM 
eo'co" 



o o o o 
oooo 
O^rH x^co__ 
oTeo^o" 
o 

rHt--<J<CO 



o5 3 



t- oi eo X X o 

X O rj< CO CD in 

t-^ CO o.-H_05_co__ 
in o'^'c-'co" 
irt CD in 03 X 

O in X O rt rH 



O CO X O C73 

rf CO t> CO r-l 

00 Tfi-H t-__oo 
eo'in odt-^in 
X X 03 CO in 
co^o ^^o__eo^ 

tH Co'cO-CO-rH 



CDXt-lrHrjH 

t- o xco eo 

03 03 03 CO oS 

in co"-^ 03" t-" 

X 03 03 o 
X r}« in X 



00 CO CD X 

eo eo t- eo X 

t-_CO__i-H 1-^ o__ 

co'ufio o't-" 
o CO eo o in 

t> 03 "^^CO 
CO'CO' ^HrH 



t-THcoeo 
in t- rji in 

C0_^CD^O_^t-_^ 
coco"'* 00 
t- ?D CO 03 
Xt-»Hi-l 



C 



• 3 0) . 



„ 6 £ (D 
0) cm^r 



«-. (h Cj 3 ^5 

ooooQ 



^ ^ t-, 

01 <D O CS 

g cs cfl o 0) 



OJ o g . 



Ills 



Maryland State Departmp:nt of Education 



213 



o « S 

"11 

O 



pi 



"r" cS "3 
3 i C S -S 

ja es 2 CIS 



r2 to 

Hli-i 



o.So 
•xs C O 

w > CJ 



.2 >>2 

O O! 



N 0> 
OS 

lo 00 



t- 00 

O^00_^ 

in in 



t ~ in 



o o CO 

CD 00 50 

CD IN 
CD ^ 



CD 00 
CD O 



i-H in O N U5 

O5r^00Tj<C0 

CD_^00 O t> 00 
.H IM O M 



00 t}< CO O 
lO 05 W CO lO 

•^"cD oTco'iN 

IN r-l 



05 « N 
OC0 0500 
t- C- CO F-( 



■>*' CO 05 00 
OC<IO>00.-I 
■^_^CO 00 05 
OCD"i/5 t> CO 
00 00 iH 



T}< »0 05 00 
CD 05 N 
.-I 05 05 .-I 



t- CD W U5 U5 
00 030510050 

t-' C<fo'o5l>IN 



05 CD C- IN CD 

inmt- m ^ 

CO CD^i-^^CD^iC 
o'o5'"o-roo''iN" 
IN iC 05 IN IN 



CO in t- 00 O) 
t- o 05 00 00 
CD^^O^IN in t> 
^'"l>o'cD''-«t 

o in i-H 



.-H'oo'"t>ino" 

OlOrH(N.-l 



>-l O 00 CD 

CD in<N ^ 
in o^o5__-* 
"-^r in 05*0' 

Ot}.(N 



O-f t>-«tCDWTl< t>t-05 
(NO NOOmcOO rHINt- 

o5ffJ in -^i" 00 i-i CO oO'-HO 



Ot>N 
t~ 05 O 
N CO rH 



inoo:-«j<<N o:-^ininin 

^ 0:OtJ<05C^ CD(NO(Nin 
00 CDiNt>CDO 03^-HCD0> 



in in oi — I o 

05 O t>(N 05 
>-i(NCCD»-l 



t>o.-io:;D oc o -t 

CD 05 Ol N in (N ^ 00 

ooooo500i c-o;cD^ 



m CD 05 t~ 05 05 10 CD o: IN 



00 o CD or 



05O: OOOO 05toe^0in oS'^N^^ ir: c~ ^ 

cDCXinoo ^orort^in oiO'i-oioi oC'--ooo4 
in O5__oo oo_oi_ 

oT 05" o'cc"—" — -'cd'oo -^"oT or't-'iN oTcD* in io-qo'in oT oc'iocDoi" 

3 in t- 10 o? CD CD IN - 



m T-i 00 c- 00 



IN <N 



-f CO O -h 
-1 (N O t> 



eg X X 



g gJ 0) 

S C cS C4 c« 



fc« I- cj 2 



c <u o efl ^ 
£ rt c5 o & 



£ o c 
M ID g S2 



2o- 



214 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



30S 
p; CM 



0) 



-.1 



c 2 5 c w 
3 ,Q o) art 



e ."ti -tj 
S 6 MO"? 



y a) ^ O m 
"IJ J 3 2 S 

.t: CLi'fi £■ 
H3 ^ 



tsfi 



IM 05 ;D in 
Tj< t- O t- 



CI ec a> o 
usee 00 1- 

05 tH ?D «0 



CO a: (N 00 
CO loeo «o 

©--J^Ni-H CO 



o in o ;d 
as lo ^ in 1-1 
inoomt-N 

00 Wr-I 



00 (Nt--^ 

mooiHos 
inecNcrs 



^ in CO 00 

05 00 Oi 
a> O rj< 05 



oooo 
oooo 
oooo 
o"(N ooT 

tH05O«5 

N inc- 



oo 
oo 
oo 



oo 
o o 
oo 
o"©" 

ino 



c<i eo X 00 

00 ^ (M C- 

--I «^"^« o 

i-H (N oo"^ 



00 CO t- in o 
inTtM— lo 
00 -<t in o 



<N N O N —< 

in t> in 00 00 

.-^Tf IN CO 

in ;c o5 



in (MOti<^(m 

(N oo-^osooec 

t> r-<^«>_oo 05 in 

c<f eo t> o'ln Tj<" 



CD t- in in 

(NinOi«D05 
OS rH O (N (N 
r-T cot-" 



t~ X in in c- 
(N ec in »-i 00 

o" i-T inw 

■<1< 05 00 

CO tH 



o_^ t>^_^ 
ccoo' 



OCD -oo 



NO -o in inoi o 
coo -coco T-<eo-i 

oooo ■ CJi 03 05 



oinoo 

CO'^IMIN 
inrHN 



(NOD 
00 CD 
(N OS 



00_OT 
0*05" 
OS —I 



t-(M(Ninco i-H^xQOO i-(«inr-i^ 

CO-«tCDCOt~ 0«r-i05t> inOCDt-OS 

Tfcoinc-o oooinoo ooomcoco 



CO 01 
.-103 

oo't-" 

003 



03 



CO t- ct; t> in 
Oi o t> 03 

t> 03__CO_-H Oi 

c- odin (M"o3'"t> 

03 O G5 O 05 00 

o a> CO t> in 



(M t~ t> (M 



03 CO IM 
— ( O ^ O IN 

m in 00 OS o 



O O Tj« 

CD 03 t> OJ 

t- in cD_^Tj<^co 
in m'^'oToo 
oi o in CO CO 
01 a; CD CO 



1 o 00 



04 



CO M 00 CD O 

in o CO 03 

00 03_^O 00 CO_ 

in o CD 03 1~ 

t-_t>-_^00 O3^C0 
03" CiO" -<",-(" 
CO t-l 



COCOOOtJ* 
in O rH o t> 
CO 00 OTCD 

in .-Tco'co in 
—1 in CO o 00 

C3 »^ 03 03 

.-h''co'"co''co'.h 



OS CO 03 CO in 
CO CO in CO 
cD^o t> in ^ 

OS in CO 0-. m 
.-I Tj. ;o X 



CO 05. 
^ t- . 

t> t- CO t- t> 

co'ino'ecco" 
CO X o a; X 
o o t~ in 03 
x't-* 

CO rH 



03 05 CO 03 
CO -rC Tf .H 
CD__0^t> CO_ 

oT-H 03" co'co" 

X ;d o 
a:_^-^a-. rH^co__ 
in CD* co'-h" 



rH OCO.H 
iHt-OX 
^__rH in t> 

CO* 03* oT CO 

in -1 X i< 
xt-osco 



OCOinrH 
Tt t- O 05 

t- 1> inw 
0*00 o 00 

000 03-^ 

cr- CO CO eg 

■^*co*.-r 



rH 03 

X in CD c- 

X CD CO 03 
CD X 

03 >n 



co X o .H a> 
xcooicox 
T-j^co^oo cD^^t- 
aTt-'aTrtrH* 

O Ot1< o 

CO —1 CO in 



CD 00 

X * 

01 1-1 ^ 



CO un 
oco 

X 



03 03 CO Oi X 

CD in CO cot- 
t-_^co^^^co^ 

t— X X ^ 

03 O X 

CO CO 



incoooco 
cocot-xeo 

t-_^X_^CO_^.H^Tf 

inco*in CO Tj<* 

to O -H 



03 CO CO CD 

X o -H Tf in 
cot-t-o>co 



•«t CO X a; 03 
03 O OS t- -n* 
o3^in 03^iH x_ 

X 03 CO a; X 

CO O CO CO 
CO* CO* 



.H in o OS CD 
■"t X X m 
x_^ino__co^rH 

03*in -H*in CD* 

Tj< O t- CD 
o C -M- 



oint-co 
co'^xec 
in eo^^rH t- 

■ri<'co*in 



OCDO: t- 
CD CO CO 
t-_^rH o^co 

2 1^ * ^ 

+ + C0 



cft "-t OS Ti< CO 

O 03 CO T}< CO 

CO 05CD__a5_^ 
in 00 1-* CD 00 
o .H CO 03 in 

00 CO CO CT) CO 



Ot1<03XCD 
t- OS 
O^CO 03 ^ 

00 00 in in t-^ 
t- .H rH 03 in 

05 ^ CO O Tj< 



O -rt O Oi t- 

inx-icoco 
"^^^in oi^co t-^ 
CO*-* 00 oTt-^ 
inmeox-^ 

CO .H CO CO CO 



CO t- O X Oi 

CO t- o in X 
eo_^in 05^t-_cD__ 

CO*CO 05*CD*t-'" 

t-coeo-^-H 
t- X o in 



CO in 05 CO 

X'<*0i03 



coinTfTfco oscoeo-^ffH osxcococo 



.-go 

^ 3 £ £ 
^ C ei et a 



u u u ^ ^ 



<^ 9 s « 

3 -I-' o "* 



5 



§£<ys^ ^^^^ 



-H 



-2 ^ 

t- m 

CO 

>.S S 
W.S o 

a, « a> 
5 X on 



Maryland State Dp:pautment of Education 



215 



is 



I I. 



O lO "5 C5 



iM <M O o; oo 
lO O CO O 05 

eo 00 cc 

C-. ao 
" (M CO ^ 



O — OC — 
CM Ot o 
C^l rji CO CO 



OC CO >o — _ — 
>0 CO 5C -J2 
O -"f (M ^ 
Tl< ^ lO C-J ^ 



O U? Oi to C<l 



CO — OC C C-1 
«D CO d CO ^ 



C^l Tf" -"ti 

CC — (M ^ O 

— _ t-- «0 — <M_^ 

<m" cm" -f c^i s-r 
CO — — -r c-1 

-r— ^ 



I CO CO >o I- 
I t~ 00 — 
. CO to O f- 



00 O ■«»" o 



»ooo 05 

lO CO o «o 



^ O OO CO t-^ CO 



jcicoco occcooo — loicoin 
; cc t£ c. I - ic — c; CO — t— -"TCM 



— CO OS CO o 

— I »c — as t - 

CM u'S 00 CO_^ o 

CM — — *»r5 

ITS — O C3 OO 



lO 05 to oo 

0_0_t0 CO_^O0 

ic o ic cm" t -T 
c — — — t- 
— CM CO CM — 



O CM »0 to 
t~ lO t- LO 
CM 1^ CM O CO 



CO — 



»0'»*>r~C". CO tr cc 

CM CC iC O O O CM >- O 

cm" to ^ o" co" ■« o c^r 

to — CC C5 C O CM CO 



C5 to u5e<s o 

lO CD IC »f5 
OO O 00 CO 05 

eoo-^ U5 

— CM 



CO O 1^ "5 CM 
CO "5 O to 
00 to 00 oc_^— _ 

o cm"o 

U2 OO C5 »f5 
— lO CO 00 CO 

■— "cm'cm — — 



to O0_^»C o — 

C5 Vododto 

— to 00 »0 C5 
to T»< c: CO CI 
to" 3C — " 
CM — 



CO I- to >o 



O CM CO 05 
O C5 CO CO 
— ' -V" CM — " 



eo o> CM 



CO 00 00 CO CO 
I ~ lO OC »o 

-<p"o'o"r-^o 



CD OO to 00 I 



O »C fD 0> CM 
05 CD CM IC »0 
iCt^'cOCO lO 



OOOO — CM 
to CM t~ to — ■ 

lo lo lo o 



CD CM CO CD 
l~ 00 to 
lO OO — — 

o"ad— Tod 



5? s; 



-"S^CO 

ic co"o"co"t -^ 

•«»< — OO CM CM 
CD CM_-^0_iO 
»0 ■^CM'tO -h" 



. 00 ■ 

•--5 0"02 OC"' 
t-CO— t- 



03 00 CM 

cT t--."co — "— " ■^" •^" c" lo" — " 



lO-^CMtOO CM CM OC — 

t - CO or — QCt>^toocco -^lOiO — >o 

— CO"co"cM*CM* — "co'cm"— " Oc" to" — " Cm' — " 
CO CM 



CO_ 02 O — 

lo co" oc" — " 

~ CO 



I CO ■<»< ■ 



CO CO O >rt 00 
00 CO — 05 o 

eo_o_C5 to 

Cm'oO CM"t^CO 
t^OCMOOO 



■"f CO c>) »o 



— O: CO CTJ 
05 >0 CO CO o 
O O CD CM >0 
CO CO CO >o oc 
O CO CM CO 
CD 00 



O — t^CM 
— Ol CD — " 

CO CO to m 



Oi CD to CO 



O CM ■• 



CM 00 »0 00 O 
05 -^f to 
■^^irs t--. — 
oc"o CD O"o0 

lO CD to 
CM CO to CM CM 



— CO to -< 



CO 00 lO O CO 

00 ■>»< CM O 

t-O^— t-^00 

ocr-TcM'cs 



CO "<»< lO 00 
C5 O — — 
oc CM to Tl^ 

cm"oc"co"cm" 
O O CM to 
CO C to CM 



311 
H.2 a 

Q 



3 = 

I'- 



2 o 

of- 



lO ~- 00 
«5 CM lO t— 

»o -^to^to^^r^ 

CM"o?t--"00 C5 
CM I* to O 

eo_io to_co 

co" cm" cm" 00* cm" 



CM0505CM— < COCMOCOt^ 

— oi^Cico tom — tocM 

■^_CMtOS^_0_ c_— t-^oco_ 
Co"oc"lOC:"l 



t ~ O CO CM 1 



— O t~ o 
Tf< o >o o to 
00 CM osTr— <" 



CO_CM_ — O^iO 
■^" cm"—" 00* to" 
lO CM — 00 
CM CM^O 0_ 

CicT — cm"cm" 

IC CO 



IC O 00 — 
C^l CD CM >0 

CO oc 

o"— "o"-<i<" 

CO oc oc ifS 
OO to oc IC 



CM — to 
■^fiO — OO 

— o so — 
— ^ci-^" 



00 05 CM CM 
O OO o 
CM_O_0C_00 

02 05 lO cm" 

OO t- -»< 00 



ItD ■<»< O ■«*• — 



oc to 05 O CM 



uo iq 
— CO — - 



C CD CM •<»< 1 
«5 xj" C5 O ' 

oc to I- CO ' 



0_ 05 CD C0_ • 

»c" cm" cm" V < 

oc t-~ to -^f ! 



— to — CO CM 
■>*• 00 to to 
oc 0_t0 CJOC 

co" cm" cm' c" e:" 



CO — 



O CO CM 

CM C5 to 0> — 



»C oc to 00 
O — to CO »c 
00 CD CD O O 



©""fCOOCCO 0-«J"0C5t- 



c; CM CO — 



CO O 00 C5 CMujcic^ 

cci^OiCoo -»r X — oc 

co_ IC c; to_ oc tt m 

cm" cm" c:" to r-T — to Tt<" 

I^CMCO-^ — ' t^OOCMO 

I^OC^OlC-^ OOiOOiO 

oToO CM"co"eM" — OiCCM 



h o o ^ 2 
< a a u. .= 



c 

-o 

o 



<b o c 



ai dJ fl ■ 



« o r e-c 



1Ih 

^ — >2 
■3*0.5 



I ="2 

ill 

■s * s 

" «eM 



216 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



;:2.2 

;|3 



t> a 
O vi 



ill 

Q 2 
-1 «>5 > 



§ s 



csicococot- o-*c^co»-i oo>ot^c^ 



M< c<i o « 

05 -H c 

OS iC I 



CO (M 

c<i CO 
r-. ■»t<_t^oo CO 

^ CO t - 



tn t^o>oo>oco o iM o 
»C M CO >o o 

CO Pfl^cncoc-i" io-*c<r 



O IM O 



05 (M_«D -"a^OO 



«5 Cd'cJoiD C^" 



o; C5 o O 03 
O (M oc ao 
I - GO Cv| c; -M 



O CO O: 02 
O CI 
CO to 05 



o 05 005-- — o 

COOt-Or-i COIOOO-"*-© 

■ CO o ^loc^roco" irico o'cooT 



eo o iM 

00 O 05 <» 
O oTcD 

l-H <M T-H 



1^ OO CO o t ^ 

ooo-^>oo <r> 

oc<j_eoo505 CO 
<£> iii o6 f>i T-T 



loeo 
iq >0 



»C CO t 



«0 C5 CO »c 



) CO lO 0> C-q if5 ( 



> O CO o o 



iC O O lO CO »o »o • 



o c o o 

O O O QO 



_ 1/5 IC 1/5 C<l 
lO o> t~ C^I t~ 



OO CO >0 CO CO 



) CO O ■.— CO IC 



I^TfCOOi'M CM'^— -iCOOO 

■«ft t^-r-iC<J->»iOO COOOOOCOCO 

CO CO r-T QO lo --^ ■^"o'o't-^o'' 

(M 05C»COCO-^ irt 



COOOt-(MO OOOO— HC^ coc^coc 

COiOC005C<l coc^t^co^ t^t^OOC 

cvcO'M'qiq iqiqioot-^ iqoo t-i . 

iot-"coco>c oo'o-^poo •«aJ' ooo^c 

CO CO CO --I ^ CO (M -mascot 



3 e ?^ 

a q e« i:« c<3 



OOOOQ 



S O C5 03 

5.S ii . a 



Maryland State Department of Education 



217 



I us to 



'till 



loll 



"C o C o 
a a c« ss 



«j tju uu y—* ^ * CO 

«0 -H 



00 00-«»< — t~ -H^'^O-H 

— ^ »0 05-H<0t^0i 

t C o" -"T (M"ioci-«r 

CC OO iC 
CM -H 



o »o t- 1 - ■ 



OO ■rt 05 »o 
•>ij< t--._oq 05 
<o oic^ 



OO 03 fO U5 



1 C<> »0 t ^ CO T»< 



^ CO 
CO lO 



O 

l~ CO 
C5 1^ 



t>. O O i« o 
lO lO o 

O CO CO CO M 



po o »c o 00 



O COOO o 



US — OOO 
U5 «f5 CO O* 



«5 GC 00 CO »f5 



CO t^_r-<_CO »^«00_C<1_I 

05 i-^Tt-^nTrtT c<5"coco— 

CO ^ CO ^ O 



1 - CO CO t ~ oo 

CO »»< 05 05 >C CO 



l~ CC O IM 



o m — «o 
^ ■•— cc 
c<l_«5 »- eo^^'^ji^ 
CO es"oco'''o' 

CO >0 CO 



CO O IM 

lO OS C5 (M 



O ^ CO T-H 



o — o — oo 
csi t ^ 

O^co_-— _o oo 
oo'oo"im''oco 

lO CO CO 
CO »« 



O 1- CO 1^ 
O co^ oc 
c>) cqci 

N 00*00" U5 
coco CO 



CO oq_o_io — 
o'<m'"o2'— '00 

M CO CO (M 



00 CO 



CO •<« o> o 
00 o> o 
as M t -^0_co 

05 CO CO '-^O 
O CO — CO — 



•»ti o >c CO 

— 00 CO >« 
O CO CM CO 



CO O CO QC 
t - O (M OC CC 

05 O iO »c 

t-TcO-t^^— *o■ 
CO •«»< (M CO 



CJ CO M 10 CO O I 
<M 05 CO CM CO ' 

OOO^OSO^'*^ t^_CO' 



coSioo 

<M — < CO 



CO (M N O 

00 05 <M 
00 o> »-__'«t<_ 

O (M 



e<i CO 05 (M 00 

05 CO CO 



•«1^<>4 CO 0_ 
(M'cO-.ircsriV 
CO CO •»*< 1^ 10 



CO t- — 

CO cr. CO CO 

<J~.X t^l^ 



c; u5 co"t~-" 
t- 00 oc t- — 
CO «0 00 — C5 



■«f C 

o_ —I o co_ 
•»r ic 05 — " 



"5 CO O 



CO 10 »o CM O 
CO OC t- 
»0 t~ CM CO CO 



O O CM CO 
C ^ OC CO 
CO t~ 3C QC 



o CO 05 CO o 

■<»< — ' OCOO 
100 — CM_^0_ 

co-r-T'^io-"*"' 



CM ■«1< — O O 

05 o o 

O CM US — 01 



uj 00 Tt" O — 1 

O 05 CM 03 



C c: C O 
us o: o O 

~ o;_uso_ 

O CM* CO us 
CM CO 'J" CO 



CO O >« CM 



00 CM 00 CO 



•-' CO us o — • 

r-cMoacoo t^co»coco 

CM OOCOOOOO-^ Cst^CO'V^ 

Oicouseoo" o'cm'o"'^*'^ — "orco*us*ic 

USCOUS«9<US US00O'«t<US OCt^CMCOUS 

oqoooco_05 '-l^l^oooco c3; o_co_02_oo 

co*0^us '-Tcmcm"^"" m-r^'^-^ 



> CM us O CO 
I T}< 02 1^ of 

> oc us o — 



4> • 

3 o) a> 
5**^ a c 



=3 a OS c« ea 



OOOOQ 



5^ <u O e3 • 
?; CO e« O <l> 



b£?*2 



C5 — ' o C5 ■«»< c o 

oc ><»< o t~ C: us O 
oc CM CO CM CO 



05 us — •<»< CO O C CO 

a-.i^-vfOi ^ 



■00 . 

3 a, 



: 0-2 fc 



218 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



2 a 



t - (M 00 OC (M 
O CC CO — Oi o 

CO — ^ r--^ ao 
e^Tco oo r - 



OC OO CO o 



C5 ac 



O; — «5 



<:o ac C5 cfl o 
o -a^iccoo^ 

CO lO — " C5 lO 



C 05 CC l~ 



<M CO Oi CI 
CO CO Cfl 



(M CO lO CO C<l 
<M CO CO C5 



(M C2 Ci CO oo 

05 o 

■r-^(>J^OO CD ■>i^ 
(m'iC iCQcTcO 



I 00 1^ 00 •. 



O O coco 

1 o CiO-^^^OO CD l^C^ 0_t-. 

r-T -r-' (m*<m'co''4'^"ooc^)" CO 

QC CO 



(M UD >C O 
kC ■^__0:__0-. 00 
i -Tcd'o cc" o 



CO C5 oo 

•^ co 



lO CO o »o T- c 



•<t< 03 00 CD O OOiOlM 
— >05-*T»<0 C<l CD o 

■^"e<rcro''co eo-^-^c^ 



r-^co CO »o 



c<ie<ieoc5t-~ eocooot^T-j iO'^->«<-*co — i^ — o M<t^-^cD 

lOCDOt^CO ■»J<05t-.OiO •^lOt^COO OOlCOiC •r--^COCO 

t^-ooot^-^ "^.'^'^'T.^ o t~- 1 ~ CO e<i t-^c<i CO CD oo CO 

r- rCr-TcT cT oT oT oc* co cir-Tco c^'iri" oi'coosc'oi' r-TiO'^o' 

— CO<M(M •^•ni^CD'^ OC— CO'^ t^CD— 'TfCvl COCO(M 
^ CO 05 



-s a o 



— ooiocDco 

C<l->*>CO-^30 lOCDCDClt-^ 

"•^ O'-r-^UO CO t-T 

COC<I--hCCCD t^t^COOD^ T^-^ 



CO c<i •. 
1— CO CO >o 



■^^^ C0_ CD_ CD CO 
CO 



OC 03 O ' 



(M__CD 00 M 
CO 00 Nt-^ 
CO CO ■.— CO 



o — < ■ 



> O 00 . 



05CD005 



00(Mcoeoeo r^<M-^oo i-it^eoocM ocOco(mo5 

■^•^OOOeO OC5'»»<t^O> t^t^'«l<OcO i—useot^io 

co_c>) e<i_Oi-^ "1^°^'*'^ 

t~c0O5U0or lo CO cm" t -T if5^"*tC-^ tCc>i'_reo^ 

CO00I--O0CO tT ^ ifi ■— <Z> COCOOt— CO 
•-^ CO CO 05 ^ „ ^ CM 



•Tf 05 CM CM 
CO IM If 

05 CO 05 00 

i CO oT 



SC CO "O -^ti i 

O 00 C<1 1 



— < OS 05 C5 CO CD 

as o CM I- o 

•^_O_CM_<»00 ■^OC' 

■^ir •*"coic>C'* cm't-T; 

O CM CO CM O ^ -rt . 



coo^S22 

oseot^osr^ t^--ooeoco 

CMTfiC 00"»0 ©"cm COO 00 
oo CO O CO CM 



CM CM 00 -a< 

CO CM -r- 

oooo,^, 
r-To'cood 



"5 oo OC CO 

QC CO 
CM "0 t- oo 



I OC •»!< 00 >0 



O0"lOCDC3— lO'^OOCO" 
CO O lO COOCO»C< 



o a> to 



— CO 05 CO CO CO'^CM- 



O — > CM t 



iit5.^c;t^ IOO5C5CD0D lO r- lO 

CMlOOOeOlO 0^0_>OCO_00 CM_t^CM_O^CO_ 
■tM" — " — — «5 OlC CM't-T 



C I- t- 



»c ^ CO c; 00 
'<= coos^ 
•-^lo cm" 



t - 00 CO 00 



COlC 0» CM 
oo CM CO 



§ £ u 

^ J7 a e fc 

M S3 C eS 03 ca 



e3 S J O 
OOOOQ 



<u c> O eS 

c8 o 4* 



S o I „ 

P c • 

Ma; (- J 2 

cj £ 5 a> 



Maryland State Department of Education 



219 



O M 

►Ho 



^1 

Si S * '5 



•■«j<t-Me<5 



•t-OOOi 

: t-"ec T-J" 



t~oa>oot- 



oeco -lo 



■^WOOeOCJ 00'<i<00lOt- »-<t-;D00O coc^co 

ososeOTfec t-t-osvoN o>T)<c-t-oo c<io5«d 



O — p; •— rt 



C/2 



^•13 o .2 



III 



Oi 50 CJ lO 
lO O N OS o 
(» -"t »-H lO 0_ 

ec 'Ho'^-■''* 
^^ o « >a .-H 



t^inocaco eoiMt--^oo ^mxt-os oO'-hoit* 

5£> lO !C ec t- o 1 1- CO ec as'^^ooo i-H^cscec 

;C<X0O.-H(N "^.^''.t'."^.'* "^.^.^ll^. 

pjooo'aTTr maoia^^S N"ar«"ujo" Tfr-T 



ec cs o o 00 
00 ^ «o o 05 

»-i Ot- 



00X05^105 »-IOOOt-© 



•«i<oot-t»o 
oo«ceo050 

NoTef oc" 



lO t~ lO o 
t-OOCJiOO 

:c (N CO ec 



o; o t- o o 

O t> 00 o 



la O r-l ;£! o 
U5 «D N O 



ec PI «o -"T X 



© © o w 
© l« © t> 



H 5 
a 



— to 

"a a) 



t- N 55 tr- 
ee osus^ec 
CO 00 ec 

o> ifS© c<f 
©^ w^eo 

C5 ^ C<1 (N 



tJ-^^Xtj- 
CO «5 ^ © X 

<N CO CO M C<I 



O ^ © CO CO 
t> X t> X 

© a5^»M u5 lo 

X N 05 
CO CO t> "-I 



lO C © 
X CO © C<1 S5 

co^eo_eo__©__x_ 

t-Cg©© 05 
XXNC^I-i 



liO 05 CO C5 

i-HC-c^co 

t- lO © 

inx-Tir©* 

•X x«> w 
coca 



t> X lO UO 

o © t~ CO © 

X__05_^t> t> ©__ 

©'"co'"©"t-'"©' 

t- C~ IS 
lO CJ t> ■<*' 



Tf © Tj< t- CO 
t> O © 

in 00 © © 
©"--■'Tt x'-T 
iftc^ixeo© 



© UO O". © CO 

LO © -H t 05 

©__t> U5 kO ift 

CO*— ■"x''©''cj 
© © © t- 
© CO © CO --^ 



C<I CO CO i-O t- 
C^Jt-X — © 
05 CO © © t 

©''?ax''t-''t>-* 
t- © CO — ' — « 

>.0 00 CO CO 



1.0 C © o: 
irt CO © © 
OOC^^TT X_ 
CO*© >.o 
05 X CO 
X -"J" CO 



=3 c « ca c« 



o 2 eu ca o 0) 



Ma) cJ2 £ 



220 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



'S 



S s 

WD 
V 



PL, H 



O m 

a 



11 



22 1 a 
III 



CO CO 
O 05 



O 00 ^ oo 



C -"f iC O O CO CO O O ! 

CO C5 <M o <r> t 

iMCC— O ^—OO^CO 



c<i CO a; 

M CO CO — oo 
t'^O^'^^O CO 

o oco t-^io 
o; CO 05 o (M 



(M CO — — ' 



>o o t~ o 



CO OO 00 
CO>r3COOC-<r -^^COC^-Ht^ 

o't^'c^Tt^io Cioo"c305ci 

CO CO CD •«»< CO C5 (M O <M 



C CO CO 
O CO •>!»< 00 
CfT CO lO »0 CD 
O CO CO C<l 



lO 05 00 



"0 CO 00 00 ITd OO 

oo oo oc oo o 
o o lo 
c^" ^'co ^"o'c^j" 



iCCOlCOt^ (MOCOOOOC 

COOCDOCO OOCt^OOt^ 

cnr-- lO T- c<i_0^cq o;_^oo_^ 

<n"cO -^USeM" — "OC-OO'CO CD 



CO (M CO 



— 00 CD CD 

»o oo oo 

<M CO t^_^ 

o CO co'cJ 

C5 — 0> 



3 

^ CO o 3 



flsi 



^11 



<M O 

o ■ — o 

CO 



O »f5 O 



CD N CO 
O <M CO 0> 
— CO 



^ Ot IM iC — < 

CO — o 

■»f< lO oc — 



■ O'va-.oo — 



■f CO — CD 00 

cT eo" (m' •«»<"■ 



CO co_^^cq 05 

l-^O CO CO o 



■.— CD O <M CO r- o CO 

OOlMO-^-^ CO«5COC<lCO 

co^Ot-co ^,~t'^J-.~ 

•^•^ffa^co co" 05 Tji' 



O 00 eo oot^O'^ 

»CO:(^>OiO lOI>-00-»»< 

CO CO — ^co co__t>^Oi_ai_ 



M 02 CD ■ 

O — ' ! 

>0 CO O 1 



(M 05 <M CD 



. CO I - 



— (M 03 



00 

O (M »o o 



00 ^ 00 CO 00 
— < 00 03 CD 
03_ C<1 — »C 00 .-H 

o c^ift b-TodoT 

O "5 »0 05 <M 



CO c: (M CO 
C<I OC CO <N 
0C_CO — ^'-^ 

»rj CO CO CO -4' 



<M O: 'ti -"flCCOCO 
CO— •(M-hCi 000'<»<0 
CO .-^ (M o: C2 CO 



^ iM eo <M 



= £ £ 



OOOOQ 



<t> O C CO . 

i^^-^i .-ill 



Maryland State Department of Education 



221 



TABLE XVn — Disbursements for Debt Service: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1961 



Local Unit 


Total Debt 
Service 


School Construction Debt Service 


Long-term County Bonds 


State Loan 


Redemption 


Interest 


Redemption 


Interest 


Total State 


*$32,834,165 


t$14,195,458 


t$9,110,582 


$7,227,622 


$2,297,293 


Allegany 


604,319 


161,000 


47,869 


324,797 


70,653 


Anne Arundel 


2,727,776 


1,353,000 


914,169 


398,844 


61,763 


Baltimore City 


5,763,786 


3,628,000 


2,135,786 








7,587,303 


2,901,000 


2,503,951 


1,826,122 


356,230 


Calvert 


258,807 


tioo.ooo 


t64,506 


74,284 


20,017 


Caroline 


248,492 


90,000 


61,096 


80,914 


16,482 


Carroll 


350,548 


100,000 


7,500 


189,990 


53,058 


Cecil 


666,745 


300,000 


125,175 


168,509 


73,061 


Charles 


260,048 


49,000 


10,153 


147,797 


53,098 




*278,160 


116,000 


79,806 


68,129 


11,015 


Frederick 


782,301 


210,000 


212,928 


260,767 


98,606 


Garrett 


197,411 


100,000 


26,688 


59,385 


11,338 


Harford 


760,983 


394,000 


254,490 


99,612 


12,881 


Howard 


415,486 


157,000 


56,433 


154,128 


47,925 


Kent 


139,341 


50,000 


22,575 


49,635 


17,131 


Montgomery 


4,778,783 


1,449,458 


989,456 


1,605,670 


734,199 


Prince George's 


4,367,048 


2,057,000 


1,055,735 


829,084 


425,229 


Queen Anne's 


152,125 


50,000 


25,788 


58,971 


17,366 


St. Mary's 


149,770 






116,387 


33,383 


Somerset 


147,803 

302,893 
1,008,204 
623,615 
262,418 




48,062 

63,275 
245,298 
131,480 

28,363 


87,154 

85,157 
262,941 
178,238 
101,107 


12,587 

9,461 
99,965 
28,897 
32,948 


Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 


145,000 
400,000 
285,000 
100,000 



* Includes $3,210 principal paid on short-term loan for current expenses not included in other columns, 
t Includes $15,000 principal and $6,675 interest on long-term current expense loan. 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



3^ 



C4 = 
.11 



g CO 

Is s 



> -a 

O c 



■c3o 



GC O (M . 



(M -^f e<i 

CO O ■»f 
CD — (M 



■ — «0 — 03 

• 0-. OC' 05 oo 

• QO CO »0 



»C • CO 50 

:o">r:50 

_ o — 



; GO o> 



O "C 

o 



1,763 


1,347 




.027 


c= 
O 


>o 




CO 
CO 



oo >« i-_cc 
o — 'co'^-^oT 
c; «>i CO 



c o c 
CO — 

<M CO O to 



CC O CO 



O CO 

_ CO (M 
CC CO — . 



CO O OO CO CO 
O <M CO CO ■«t< 



c c<i CO 

CO I - CO 
O CO 

co'co-O 



C-. ac o cr. i>j 

C:' 0> co" O: I - 
(M CO (M I ~ 

— «o «o 
co'— " 



CD lO ^ 



I- I - x»< O OC 

co_^--__»o oc 

CO t-^-^c<ror 

O — OJ 



QC O C5 
UO — — CO — 

CO 1^ oc co_ 



IC ift 00 < 



oc — t--. 

CO CO (M oc M< 
CO_.— _^'»*>_CD <M__ 
T}<"<M''t--"cD O" 
CO — I ~ >o 
--^ CO — 



^ CO CO 
CO —I 03 CO 00 
CO CO CO 



C (M CO 



—^^eO OO CO 

co'^'oiO 

— — CO oo 



o 


>C IM — 


• • CO • 

. . o • 






• CO iC 


■ ■ • 




CO 


• • 


■ ' e5 ■ 





oc — < 



— CO ifS 

>c co_i-^ov o_ 
oTo'i-^i^od' 

— CM CO 

— CS 



CO C: OO CO "O 

05 00 oc o 

CO 



— ■ CI o — 



^ CO C-1 oo 

oo cor^ic 



C5 to CO 
»OC<l CO 

co" C-1 co' 
o 



eo «c 

CO 

CO CO 



^ O OO >« 

■ 00 05 o 



»C CO O ^ 05 

(M — >oeooc 
o_eo "5 te^os 
oc o"r^u5 ic 

C<1 Cl CO lO 



CO "5 O CC lO 

CO o o 

0:_^lft OC_CO •^^^ 
CO 

CO c-i o 



oc ^ CD — 

c^ T»< CI CO 



C<l C<> d 05 1 



CO 
CO 



y-*<Z><S^<Si 

oc i -Tco o 



CO CO O GO t^l-OO-** 

occo — cr- o ocscocoor 

CO o 05 ■«i"_^co lO CI co_^o_e'i 

Cf 00 t-T co" cT CO oc' — co' 

O M oc CO "<t< CI O 



or .^^^ co_^ CO I - oiccoeo^^os 

>ci-C)co"t- oo"eoc)ic 

CO CO C CO CO CO CO CO '(^ OTj 

— O CO CI CO 



•>*< oc O: CI 

OO CO "5 CO 

CO — < r-- CI 



-go 

^ 3 £ 

0^ CimX- u L. g i; 

;=aScScSc« c<3:S<u-CO 



aj o O ec! ^ 
5- cs c« O o 



t, I, a; 
Ma, c « 2 



Maryland State Department of Education 



223 





9 c 
2 o 
•— ; oo v3 




^ £ a 3 


Plant 


Operation 


School 


Mainte- 
nance 


Other 
School 
Services 


Total 
Current 
Expenses 



iC 05 00 Oi ifS 
O 1^ O O <M 

0*0 00 05 00 
(X>CO «0 OO T-1 



^ O i« O 
•f ^ •<»< lO 
«0 lOO 

O CO 0:0^ 



I- ^ 00 CC 'M 
CO CD to >0 
O t£5 —^us ■«r 
'scsoi'co 



S S c2 1— 1^ 

•O CO «o C<1 f 



C>) -H iO ^ O M c<» 



CO Ci CO 
00 1- CO O 

CO »C CO oo 

in CO I 



O O U5 00 00 CD lO 

-H 00 CO CO 

i^co_o COCOO_t^CO_ 

"coo 05'co*(m''o" 



r^coc^coo 

C: 00 CO O 
CO l-^»^CO 05 



w S 2 lo 

lO 0_ !M_ 1 

CO CO CO* co" 



CO CO 00 
05 0> «C CO 

ao o -^co 00 
00 o't^o'co" 

QO O <M 



^2;2j>o^ 

_^cq 
To'co >t5 



«0 IM ICCJ 



05 00 CO T-i evi 

0> O CO CO 

o> CO CO e<i_i--^ 

— 'f-Tco occo 
>0 •'f CO — 1 



O 00 C5 O (M 



CO CO CD CO 
lO — . 00 

t~ oc cqt-^ 
coco "^OCO* 



oo c<i c; O 
c> (M_r-^o_co 

C3 CD CO c-r 



O-<CiC0'— ceo — CO" 



Tt< O IC CD 

— QC CO lO 

o_^co c^_^co_ 

OC*QC*COCO" 

— GC CM <M 



O -"f" CO CO 1 - 
(M_^ •tT 1 - 

Vcn od V 

CD ■Tt< OO iC 
»0 00 OO — 00 

CO 00 o 



ic o CI cr. >o 

CC I- IM — O 

CM c; CO O 



I - CO -"l" (T^ i« 

CO 0> iM CO CO 



CO iC CO CO Ca 

— c; o: oc I ~ 

— o ic<r^ »o 
oc<f »oco t -^ 



O CO CO M 
-<t> O »c 

o — o^^co 

lO 05 ■" 



CO o CD iO or 

— o"co — 

— (M — 



CO O CD 05 CO O 
05 M< — O CO O 
— >0 0_— IMO 
CDt^TjTus^ 



O — C I - 

O CO OC 

— eo"co"(M" 



CO lo ic e-j o 



O O CO 
O 00 CO 
CO I~ oc oo 



00 OO 05 CO < 



■«1< T-l O O 

05 O o 

O >f5 — 

ifs o> — — aT 

<M CO >0 CO 



O O •«»• o 
(M O ■— CD lO 
OO 00 CO — t-;^ 

O CI — CO 



I CO CO f O (M CO '10 



CO OS IM (M (M 



00 OS 00 CO o> CO 
'O 05 N C<1 CO <M 

0__ ■^-^*io_e^i, 

i-< i-H CO O 0> OS 

tl >f5 CO 00 

1 aco»« — OS 
CO CO O "5 
CO — ^ 



■«»< CD CO_CO_^ 
OD t--"oc"o"(M" 
t- OO «5 



l« CO 00 CO t-- 

cvToc t^co >o 
■— o: 00 ic oa 
OO 05 CO OS 



lO t- CO OS 
0C*O00"cD 
O. (M O 



— eo OS CO CO 

»-c iC — OS I- 
M UO 00 CO »o 

N — — — ">« 

•n — . CO OS OO 
o_co_^o-^ 



CO N — - ■>*< 
>0 OS 05 CD 00 
O 0_'0 CO 00_ 
>0 O ^fl 
O — ' — — 

r- CO <M — 



CO »C OS (M 



O_00 CO t- CO 
(M*'^— CD -flT 
CO CO CO 

r- 1 CO CO iO 



— CO_CO CO CO 

os'co -^lO e>J 

— — < CO 



1—1 U5 O i« 
CO — t- (M 

OO OS C3> — 



»0 O IM o 



— 00 OO 
I - (M C4 lO to 
05 >q t^_^a3_co 
•^"cm'i -" CO I - 
CO »o »o I- 
<M CO CO CO IM 



t~. CO •»*< — 
<M CO Tf< lO CO 

CO "O^ (m' OO 



(M OS CO »0 
— CO <M O: O 

M* CO OS O* CO 

-r CO O CT- O 

W CO CO 



CO — ■ O lO 
CO CO CO 
— C^OS_^CO_^ 
CO lO OS — f 



CO ^1 



OO OS CO CD 00 
—I CO 00 — CO — 



CO CO — 

— iceo 



CO 00 o CO 

CO OS I - lO OS 
■"_CS — — 
OS o"i-^co»o 

»C — OO OS CO 
"5 CO — ^_^OS_ 
■T-TcO CO CO — 



CO — CO OS ■<if< 
lO CO Tt" — lO 
CO 00 irt o 
—" CO* CO CO CO* 



>C OO »C CO 
iJ^Os CO Os_co_ 



•>*• O — CO 

oco"c x" 
O "51 - o; 



■ >> 



CO S3Ce«:«oJ rtc« <u J= O £ e« c« O 
-3 <<mfCO OOOOQ t-CS3 



S o c 

S "i! = 

c* CP - 



o 



224 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



> ICGOOS-^CO CO 05 OO C5 •>*< 
I CO CO O O CO <M 00 t^cot^ooco 

ICO -r^ r-l CO 1— 1 OD IC 1— 1 



(M OO ift O (M CO 

<00<M<MC<1 (M05t^0 

t^c^T-^'io CO CO t-^ <m' t 

l«COi-H(Mi-l tOlCr-l 



I CO 05 l« 00 



IC 05 lO (M 



, - ' C3 CO C^O»C-<f^ 
OC-^OSlOOS CO ■■— • CO «o 

t--r«D05— *o ■<l^'^>^I>^•^■' 



O C C 3 
02 >-< 



.£ a 



05 O »0 CO 
00 — IC t-^To 



10 -^i^ t^ co - 
co oo'oo'< 

(M IC OCi 



o 05 CO 05 o eot~coo5«o locoeoceoi 

c»>«oooo c<io<r>(M<c> «5050-^«o 

<M_'<)<_^-^_^<M_00 "^'^t^Ci'^ 

o'fM'io •^■^ " atnto-^-^ CO o •-"^cicsT 

— — — ^ (M -r- <M ■— (N 



<_»f5 00_^00 



•— — 3C C 05 M 



CO C<1 CI o 
O OC CO 

cTco'oc cm"co 



•X t t - t- 

iO «C ■>»< OC' o 



0_5D 0^00 »C 

to t^oo ■— "ui 



05 kC 05 (M 

COO {£5 cD't--r 

00 CO — 



CC M CO lO CO 05 00 >o 

CO Co"'* I>^-»1^ C20>00*0'^ 

l~iCCOC<H^ CO (M -"l" — -tfi 

CO o> 05 CO ic CO 



10 CO 00 •— 



C-. o o (M o 

O lO M <M o 
(M CO »0 CO C<l 

7-"cD c-r<55 »-r 



o 00 o < 



00 CO 00 >« 

CO — — »C .-H 

00 CO 



icooo»o oolo — o— C5««coco ooeo — 

CO — 00<M CC t~ >OOIMC2— 005t~-.— 

CO — IN CO i^t^co(M05 o<Mcoiooo oo'^oo^ 

csT^^ — — — uie^ — c^^^ 



(M no O O O 
•>*> t- o o o 



05 o oc CO »o Ci 10 

M CO 05 — 05 00 00 OC' — 

co-^cct^tD odco CO oo"c<r 

>c — lo — T-1 o 10 — •— I '— 1 



>0 O 03 o 

ic CO t-- 

— <M"t^t>r 

— (M — 



CO t - -<f 

ca CO 1^ ic 00 

O O0_ 00 0_ 05 
•^jT rj< CO 00 CO 
CO 00 — 00 — 
<M_^CO t-- lO 
— "lO CO 

(M — 



oocoococo cococ^io— oocoocost^ 

ooeoocso CO cj -^j" CO — o 00 

oot--coo_-o^ CO — — eo-^ '^.''1''^.*^. 

— -^ocsos Ci-^icoco lO Gc cm" 00 

01 CM CM OCi05C5— I^IOOIOOO 

>« — (MOSCO 0:10 — 05-^ IMCO-^t^'^ 



CM — 

CO 00 

CO CM Oc" 00 



»o «o o o» 
I , ^ ,^ 

CO CM — — 



CO o »o — — 
— CO — 00 lO 
CM IC CO Tj< 



CM_-^_05 OO^^CM 

CO t^oTi-'i-^ 

"5 O CO O 00 



CO 05 »0 05 O 

■«i<"ic r-T CM- 
OS — 

— CM 



I^CO 00 

"co'co'co'co 



CO CO ^ 

— c<i CO as 
co_^»o Ti^^o^o 

C5*-^-«0-t^-„- 
00 O CO CO 



O O CM CO CO 

10 ic — t- 

CO CC5 O 

CO't^— cm'o- 
CO CO 



»« — CO »o o 

CM 00 O O 
CO CO CM 05 «0 

oTo'cM-co 00 

iC CO — CO — 



CO OS >0 00 
CO — <35 

t-Tco-oo'-TtJ'-^ 

— 10 CM OC CM 



«5 CO — CO 



— CO CO 



CO O — ■ 



CO CO 00 10 
— O »0 CO CM 
CMiCCOCO — 



i-^oo — C2 

CM t-- O — CO 

— — CM cq — 



■Tf" O C: 10 
10 CO CM 00 — 

o-oTo"— o* 

OC CO C5 
CM — Tfi — 



•^CO t-^lO 
O >0 «5 »C 
— 05 CM CO O 



00 — 05 00 
— 05 — •«*< 

CO — 00 »o 
cm" cm" CO 

o> o — >o 



go t--. _ _ _ _ _ 

O C0C0C_O»0 O'C'^'OCM 

CO CCO'^'^lO — ' 05 t-~^ CO CO 

•o t^eoo^rcM -^t^i 

CO cMiooot^r^ 

2; CMCOt-r>0 

o c<i — 



" CO CO Oi 



■«t< CM IC 10 CM 

CO CX; OC CO 
1<_^t-CM_^0.0_ 

•^(Si^n CO lo 

O iOOC — CO 
10 00 03 CO 10 



OC 10 O CM 

TP tC oT t C — 

■"ti CO 02 •«f CO 
— CO O CD 



05 iC o> 
— CM CM 

00 »q CO — 
CO »o oTo 



1<JU N 



V o a 

o ^ ^ 



^3 

■5 " 



is c3 



I 



Maryland State Department of Education 



225 



O 00 05 »o •f 



I if3 «5 O 



1 (M O 05 00 QO — ■ < 



CO 02 05 CO O 
00 O O CC 
CO 00 O O 05 -^OO-^kOiO 

- - lO — ■ .-H 



CC CO CO 03 CO OO CO o 

(MI^COIOOS lOC^l'JOlO 

(M*-^— "rood — "ceo'o" 

(M O — "M iC CC <M 



'O -f CO 



CO Ol <M Tjf 

o oo^c^Tco 

UO C5 1^ CO — . 

CO >o 



OO 00 05 



CO'OOiOCO --Ot»<cOO 



^ (M (M iC 
»C 00 1^ 



O CO oo ro^^kO 
CO ^>o (m'o" 

00 T-H 00 CO <— I 



CO O c 



- _ _ CO CO 

050>0 1M<M ■'ti^COl^-^ 

O00C0COO5 I~~IM_CO00O5 

^oTood-^ odcocot^i^ 



ooo<M(MO eo--cor^ 

»OU0OC<J<M t^ — lOOO 

•^l~0t^05 ■>*<OCCOC^ 

C^'o'co'-^^ C-r to" CO 



CO 00 ■«»< 



-.»< OS 00 UO C5 

O CO 

CO >o t-^M^'e-J 

— 



O O CO CO 

^ T-H 



O OS CO "5 

c*: CO lo 



y-^ m in a> 



00 CO o 



to ^ — < 0> >0 CO'^COCOOO 



"5 CO O CO 



I - OC 00 CO 



U5 CO O CO CO 05 CO CO ' 
»C05'-^0'^ kOOt-<MCO 
CO ^ CO (M O3C0C<l'-<00 



CO CO »q ■>*<_ o> 
05 CO* CO iri 

CO lO CO CO I- 



O <M <M O 
OO CO<M 05 CO 
•«*< »0 CD OO 

«5 irJ' 



CO CO 30 O 



§ § ( 



05 t-- o o 



t^ic05>oeo o 00 ^ o 



Cfl rf" OS 00 



oi>-co(Mio eo^co^c 
CO ■^'"t~-rcs OOM eoodost-T, 



I o o 

CO CD l~-^CO 

odo'oo't^ 



to CO (N 03 
t ^ CO "O CO 
•^(M 05 O <>J 
t-^T-H"cO "if 

Qc m lo o CO 



CD <M CO 05 CO 
05 OO 05 CO 
>0 Tji^O C<I oo 
CO c^od-- 



CO O 00 
Tt< (M 05 CO 

■^O >0 CO 

lO co'Vco'co' 



I- o r- c; t< 



^ 



(A 

On 



III 



t~ c-> o < 



IC 05 OS lOCO 
O'cvf co'o't-^ 
lO to CO OS -H 
pq lO >0 o: — 1 



OC CO CD O 



(30 CO CD CO 
^Cvf>0 O" 

»o -H I- o 05 



coocoot- 

00 ^ ^ oo 02 

(>j lo --^o^o^ 
■^co -^^"b-r 

CO 05 Tti 



o; CO O CO 

1^ Tf" CO CO lO 

t- ^ O 00 (M 

>oo 



. lO TP iC 



»0 05 oo 
lO CO 05 

to Oi CO ^ 



I CO O CO — ' 

OC (M to 00 QO 



0_-<1<_>0 CI 05_ 
t--r CO oc od 

— 05 CO 00 



c CO — 

C-. O — 00 
C_ to OC 00 CO 
<m' 30 co" 02 



1 <M CO lO 

I ^ -<r CD CO <M 00 c^) 

I CO ^ CO ^ 



S S M O i-H 

CO 00 lO CO CD 
C^' lO >o to 



(MOOOOCOIM C;Oi-H-^c<l 

(MCOCOOOO »- CO -"l" OS 

-^•«i<_t^_»o 0_ 00 0_P)CO_-- 

od oT 05 OS CD 1^ od 



>0 CO CO I ^ 
»0 — 30 05 

'^l 

— r CO* to o" 



03 CO CO 00 
<N C5 
05 0^CO_-<1< 
■»}<*t^02 (M* 



0C_ 0C_ I ~ 
o'cm' co"cd* 
OC to 30 



3C 3C IM 1^ 
CO TJ" oc o 

—"^"0*30* 
CM 

O — 05 



^ Isllgi oErzinl f^|:S| J--i§| 

— -jj-UMsGO QOOOQ ti^CWSisi ^--PnCy^-E 



o o c 



i 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

S ^ i : ;;;;;; 



i 



: : 



t 



llsilllgMilli 



PSiS^SS ;S : ; : : : |||| : 



|S2gS?S5S : : : SiSSSKI :2 : : : : : SS^S 

^ • CO • • • M ^ . . . 



i 



5 s'-sssssss 



1 



5 g22gS-S55g : 



ills 

IPT 



SMI" 



1 



iMiiimiiiis 

00- 



WIIT 



14^ 



liimisiiiiii 



jiiiii iiiUliiffi pi 



Maryland State Department of Education 



227 



2- : :|||3 



WWW 



WW 



22^ 



MPIllIIIIIIWISlWffMiOIP^ 



881 :i : 



1" 



liiiilif" 



"lis" 



ess" 

13^ 



IPliraiilMIIM 



sis' 



Hi 



lips 



r^ — t- 




iiiii 



iSli 



228 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



it 



i 



i 



22 



:^ : : : 



: : : 



::::::: : 



= : : : ::::::: 



I : : : :^8;52S¥^"^§ 



o«ocooo-t^ 



li 
11 




iil 



Maryland State 

^ ; ; ;^ ; ; 

:::::: : S :^ :^ : : 
: : : : : : : 

S^S^^ : : : : : : 

: : : : SS:^-^ : : 

: : : : f^r:?-^ : : 

: : : : g?:5-g : : 



Department of 



Education 

?l :?1 : : : 



229 



|3 :^ :S : : : S = 5 : : §^ :^ 



^5 :S5 



: : : 



253 : : 



5^ 



: : 2§SIgS 



: : : : ^§§-S : : |Sz:5S^?5^ : : : ^SSI : : '^^S^S S 
gJg^SS : : : : : : ^|^g^^gS : : : ^gS : : 



522^§5^^ : : : : : 2 



III 



: : : 



: : ||r£¥|~ff~ir 



T-r- Mass 

g : :S^?g^S||« |.-g2j^ ^§ g 



2§5gg-'^«g I :s2g5^5 I : |g|2j^ 55 

"C O^^ .flee C O 




I 



i 



i 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



i' 



-I 



O 



|§SS : : : SSSSSS 1 S ::::::: 



2 :S5SS : 



I 



;S|SS5i2lliS 



lilSiP'Iailf 



t2 - 



o c^. — to o CO o^o^B^c^-'f^ o CO o o 




Maryland State Department of Education 231 

: : g :::::::::: ::::::::::::::::: : ?5 : : T 



e<5 




:::::: SS^S-^SSSSS :2'-g :::::::::::::::::: 


e<i 








:::::: S^?5S2?52S'^^^'^^2 :::::::::::::::::: « ^ :^ 


:::::: §i?552g2S'*^«'«^'- : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : ^ « :- 

— ^ — - — — _ ;3:; ~ ' ..- . .... ■ _ — _ _ 


o 




"5c^ • -rec .cs^ • -ci 


00 




:::::: s :::::;: : : : : : : :2:2 : :;: : : : : : : 


^S??!?'^^ :^ .c^-^^^o^ :::::::::::::::::: 
«;2;t^jcjo^ .t^ •S^S;::^;^ S^ss?* ' 


:::::: SS?;??*::: i^"'""^ ::::::::::::;::;:: — cc« 


^-. 


gS?3S2:2^:^J?2^'^^"'S : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2^=^"*^ 

— - „ Tzr, ■ , .1."; . • — ■ 1-—- — ■ — 




CO 


^ — '■ — : — ~ — fM r>j e-j OS OB g; ^ -tH QO ea CO — '■ — '■ — '■ — '■ — ; — '■ — i — ; — : — ; — '■ — : — : — : — : — : — ~ t^^^ra^^m 


:::::: SalsslslSsSSSS ................... ^gSSS 










196 
209 
235 
259 
260 
216 

3,114 

'77 
104 
193 
111 
213 
141 
166 
136 
172 

95 
136 
141 
106 
188 
151 
150 
162 
302 
135 
139 

19 

165 
36 
45 
39 
45 








2ilg^i i i ;^ ;i^l^2l^^2^!2l^2§2§l§§^ §^s§^ 










t^ooo-o. «oo(^^-ec^o(^^NOco^ooc^cD<^^^«ococ^c«coo-oc^ac<NO^^co oo^oo 



Iiiliiiii 



232 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



i 






A 

a 
H 


O 




^ : :::::::::: 


o 
X) 






i 

> 


m 


:2 : : : : : : : : : 


B^Z : : :2 : : : : : 


J3 

s 


CO 


0) 

i 




o 


g8gS--S : : : 


^S^^ |2^g^S^S : : : : : 


d PubUc 




>» 


li 


» 


SS^g^^- : : : 


- oo^^^gc^j^co ..... 






^1 


o 




! 




1 
1 


& 


m 




|ii^ii§2i§ss^ 








1 


o 




§2- 








1 


m 


2g!-22iS^ ^S--^ :S : 


§J52^ : : : : : 


in 

4^ 


2 


II 


o 


: 


: : : : : 


ad Gradui 




1 






^?^?5^^2 2j^--?5-^ : 


SSI3S^5^?5S : : : : : 




Ungraded 
and Post- 
graduates 


o 




« 

1 
T 




m 




oo 






o 


2-?5§^i:: : 


i^riSi^ s^s:s;;gs^?5 ; : : : : 


tti 
u 
S 









CQ 


I^SSS^ ^?3-:2S-^ : 


: : : : : 










O 




: : : : : 


ej OS 


t- 






CQ 




g^^g |§Sg5g3S^ : : : : : 






Year and Sex 


2 


O 




gSS?^ : : : : : 












: : : : : 


fl 






05 


O 




|F3^iS gillS^^JSS : : : : : 


1 
1 


>o 


\ 




m 


g??225;^S : 


igai-^^ ; : i ; i 


d 






OO 






IS 
o 








m 






rt 
H 








o 







h 


CO 










i : : :^2§ggi. 


s 








o 


l2g^i§ ISil 






I 


i 






859 
451 
223 
185 

4,370 
754 
349 
821 
333 
270 
170 
242 
256 
387 
457 
274 
571 








ill 




^^t-OO^Tf. oooooooo 


^T».00 ^ (M iC « .O Tt- «5 iC to 00 














TABLE XXII— Cc 


Local Unit 
Name of High School 


St. Mary's 

Leonardtown Sr.-Jr. . . . 

Banneker Sr.-Jr 

Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr. . 
Great Mills Sr.-Jr ,. 
Carver Sr.-Jr 

Somerset 

Washington Sr.-Jr 

Marion Sr.-Jr 

Woodson Sr.-Jr 

Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

Deallsland Sr.-Jr. .. 

EwellJr 


Talbot 

Easton Sr.-Jr 

Moton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michael's Sr.-Jr. . . . 

South Hagerstown Sr . . . 

Boonsboro Sr 

North Hagerstown Sr . . 
Williamsport Sr.-Jr .... 
Clear Spring Sr.-Jr .... 

Hanonolr Sr - Tr 
nancocK isr.-jr 

Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 

Boonsboro Jr 

South Potomac Jr 

North Potomac Jr 

Washington Jr 

Hancock Elem.-Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 



233 



l«00 C<l ^ 



t - r-l ^ (M 



C<5 O «0 ■««• O CC 

U5 O 03 05 05 

iC<M CO t— 



05 ^ T- N CO 



i*< <M ,-1 ,-H 00 
CO<M 



(M ec If CO 



CO OC <M CI 
^ --^ (M CO CO 



CO • • -O CO 



lOCO 

»fl <M ^ Tjt 



oo O 



C<l Tf IM 05 

o 00 -^ri 



C<l O o: CO t~ 



>O0-«l<O0CO 



o oc 02 — ^ 



O • CO CO 



O «D 00 O " 



I CO CO «0 00 



o 05 «o 00 

t^COTft^O 



O >0 — ^ lO 



O5 00 useoo 

03 t- O <M 0> 

O — c^coeo 



00 00 M (M 
OO so lO «o c^' 



©CO 
u — a> 



^ o) 

O Oh 'A ?- 



234 



Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 
TABLE XXIII — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Total 










Social 






Mathe- 






Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


ment 


























D 




B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


93 , 333 


91,467 


31 647 


29 576 


61 634 


61 856 


58 551 


58 400 


69 774 


Oo , OZZ 


81 Q'ifi 
81 , y<>8 


ii n7R 


1 04K 


4, eo4 


4,051 


3,937 


470 


377 


3 570 


3 558 


3 469 


3 372 


o,^iu 


Q 1 40 

, i4y 


Q 110 




0, 162 


oo4 


404 


102 


107 






102 


107 


102 


' 107 


72 


yo 


87 
8/ 


01 

yo 




112 


123 






112 


123 


112 


123 


104 


1 in 

1 lU 


on 


08 

ya 






1,012 


985 


58 


28 


954 


955 


954 


950 


870 


741 


812 


780 
/ 8y 


01 
yi 


1 9K 
1/0 


979 


973 


25 


19 


954 


954 


915 


875 


850 


809 


81 1 

81* 


781 
/ 80 


Q8 

yo 


123 


385 


379 






385 


379 


385 


379 


316 


zyu 


004 


ORG 

/by 


A(\ 

4U 


22 


387 


394 


172 


igo 


215 


234 


183 


176 


290 


304 


312 


11 1 

oil 


07 


44 


281 


238 


43 


32 


238 


206 


230 


201 


202 


1 80 

isy 


991 


1 08 

iy8 


10 


15 


497 


449 


29 


15 


468 


434 


435 


oyo 


^lU 


^109 


An9 


119 

00/ 


R1 
DO 


75 


116 


106 


44 


36 


72 


70 


72 


70 


116 


106 


1 1 R 
110 


1 nfi 




99 


87 


99 


87 










QQ 


R7 
8/ 


00 

yy 


87 
8/ 






81 


96 






'76 


'% 


'si 


'% 


81 


96 


70 


96 






8,798 


8,601 


760 


662 


8 036 


7 931 


7 927 


7 734 


6 078 


5 458 


7 805 


7 088 


1 \f\ 

J 00 


1 87 
18/ 


l!o25 


996 






1 025 


996 


958 


'881 


'742 


555 


749 


00/ 


/ 1 


U9 


344 


336 






'344 


333 


345 


335 


294 


224 


282 


01 
zi/ 






471 


537 






470 


537 


460 


528 


393 


387 


oOO 


309 


*o 


18 
08 


337 


355 






337 


355 


333 


323 


243 


220 


97(1 


911 

Zol 






926 


938 






925 


935 


915 


929 


696 


634 


892 


814 


21 


OK 
/O 


574 


620 






574 


618 


574 


620 


493 


386 


465 


10/ 


91 

ii 


40 


717 


634 


293 


249 


424 


385 


424 


385 


424 


385 


424 


000 






845 


884 






845 


884 


826 


845 


741 


766 


804 


822 






610 


548 


467 


413 


143 


135 


143 


135 


389 


360 


610 


548 






1,021 


988 






1 021 


988 


1 021 


988 


704 


672 


1 021 


088 

yso 






792 


738 






792 


738 


792 


738 


424 


393 


792 


738 






928 


851 






928 


851 


928 


851 


OoO 




098 

yii8 


801 






208 


176 






208 


176 


208 


1 7f5 
1 / 






one 

ZU8 


1 7R 
1/0 






19,232 


18,742 


11 798 


11 264 


7 431 


7 477 


7 414 


7 471 


17 437 


15 734 


17 641 


16 031 


801 


926 


881 


891 






881 


891 


'875 


890 


' 680 


'423 


698 


589 


105 


107 


832 


910 






832 


910 


821 


907 


677 


'\f\'7 
00/ 


781 
/ 80 


RR1 
001 


74 


70 


277 


298 






275 


298 


277 


298 


190 


1 87 


189 


191 


28 


47 


81 1 


877 






81 1 


877 


81 1 


877 


608 


485 


638 


OOO 


66 


78 


957 


940 






957 


940 


957 


940 


706 


0/ y 


728 


<^88 
088 


fii 
00 


91 


1 , 108 


1 ,039 




(J 


1 099 


1 033 


1 097 


1 031 


823 


565 


881 


576 


84 


il' 


1 355 


1262 


22 


12 


1 333 


1 249 


1 333 


1 249 


975 


682 


997 


712 


70 
/U 


/ 


'573 


'505 


369 


302 


204 


203 


'204 


203 


526 


429 


495 


417 






665 


667 


464 


479 


201 


188 


201 


188 


648 


623 


646 


608 


59 


50 


434 


439 


325 


297 


109 


142 


109 


142 


407 


439 


390 


394 






916 


854 


588 


521 


328 


333 


328 


333 


801 


713 


818 


722 






589 


582 


589 


582 










589 


582 


589 


582 


20 


1 6 


869 


815 


579 


Ol't 


290 


301 


290 


301 


842 


797 


824 


771 
/ / 1 


17 
0/ 


KQ 

oy 


47 


49 


47 


49 










47 


40 

^y 


47 


40 

*y 






964 


965 


964 


965 










964 


965 


964 


965 


20 


28 


556 


542 


556 


542 










556 


542 


556 


542 


7 


13 


742 


729 


742 


729 










742 


729 


742 


729 


56 


53 


569 


534 






111 


1 iz 


1 1 1 
111 


1 1 9 


ooy 


Oo* 


RAO 

ooy 


Rii 
001 


00 


RK 
DO 


1 111 


1 130 


1 111 
1,111 


1 130 










1 111 
1,111 


1 130 


1 111 
1,111 


1 lift 
1 , 100 






100 


665 


/ 00 


000 










i 00 


ODO 


/oo 


000 






825 


736 


COS 

BZO 


71ft 
t oD 










oZO 


7Qft 


COK 
8ii0 


71 R 
/ oO 


/IK 

40 


K8 
08 


731 


722 


7'31 
<<51 


700 










7Q1 


700 


711 
ioi 


700 






922 


873 


090 


0/0 










000 


010 


000 

yzz 


871 
8/0 


1 9 
1/ 


98 
/8 


875 


808 


0/0 


oUo 










C7K 
8/0 


ens 

8U8 


Q7K 
8/0 


8ne 

8U8 






868 


910 


868 


910 










868 


910 


868 


910 






806 


768 


199 


167 


607 


601 


607 


597 


711 


647 


735 


647 


35 


46 


346 


347 


62 


47 


284 


300 


284 


296 


318 


277 


312 


271 


35 


38 


336 


280 


62 


52 


274 


228 


274 


228 


269 


234 


299 


235 






61 


67 


44 


36 


17 


31 


17 


31 


61 


62 


61 


67 




"8 


63 


74 


31 


32 


32 


42 


32 


42 


63 


74 


63 


74 






958 


920 






958 


920 


943 


920 


809 


762 


765 


710 


78 


99 


302 


276 






302 


276 


302 


276 


230 


206 


187 


169 


62 


74 


188 


195 






188 


195 


179 


189 


164 


160 


165 


169 






81 


93 






81 


93 


81 


93 


73 


77 


66 


70 


"2 


io 


196 


171 






196 


171 


190 


177 


151 


134 


156 


117 


14 


15 


76 


62 






76 


62 


76 


62 


76 


62 


76 


62 






93 


96 






93 


96 


93 


96 


93 


96 


93 


96 






22 


27 






22 


27 


22 


27 


22 


27 


22 


27 







Total Counties. 
1 Allegany... 



Oldtown Sr.-Jr 

Flintstone Sr.-Jr 

Fort HiU Sr.-Jr 

Allegany Sr.-Jr 

Bruce Sr.-Jr 

Valley Sr.-Jr 

Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr . . . 

Beall Sr.-Jr 

Cresaptown Jr 

Penn. Ave. Elem.-Jr . 
Beall Elem.-Jr 



13 Anne Arundel 

14 GlenBurnieSr.... 

Arundel Sr 

Annapolis Sr 

Southern Sr.-Jr . . . . 
Severna Park Sr.-Jr. 
Brooklyn Sr.-Jr . . . . 

Linthicum Jr 

Bates Sr.-Jr 

George Fox Jr 

Marley Jr 

Arundel Jr 

Annapolis Jr 

Bates Jr 



27 Baltimore. 



Catonsville Sr 

Milford Mill Sr 

Franklin Sr 

Towson Sr 

Park vi He Sr 

Dundalk Sr 

Kenwood Sr 

Hereford Sr.-Jr 

Ridgelv Jr.-Dulanev Sr 
SoUers Point Sr.-Jr. . . . 
Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr . . 

Catonsville Jr 

Johnnycake Jr 

Banneker Jr 

Sudbrook Jr 

Franklin Jr 

Dumbarton Jr 

Towsontown Jr 

North Point Jr 

Dundalk Jr 

Arbutus Jr 

Golden Ring Jr 

Parkville Jr 

Stemmers Run Jr 

Middle River Jr 



53 Calvert. 



Calvert County Sr.-Jr. 
W. S.Brooks Sr.-Jr. .. 

Beach Jr 

Mt. Harmony Jr 



58 Caroline 

59 North Caroline Sr.. 

60 Lockerman Sr.-Jr . . 

61 Preston Sr.-Jr 

62 Federalsburg Sr.-Jr. 

63 Greensboro Jr 

64 Denton Jr 

65 Ridgely Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 235 



IVIaryland County Public High School: Fall of 1960 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art— Arts 
and Crafts 


« 

Gen 


+ 
1 

V uc. 


Arts 


J 

Edu. 


General 


Voc. 


B 


Q 




Q 


g 


3 


3 


Q 


3 


3 


Q 


Q 


3 


Q 


3 


Q 


3 


Q 


3 


Q 


10,085 


13286 


4,485 


3,954 


442 


3,238 


52,936 


353 


2,916 


99 


45,302 


3,463 


10,075 


23,476 


80,389 


73,585 


48,136 


50,699 


36,2.33 


35,226 


1 


125 


191 


105 


112 


65 


40 


2,037 




136 




1,706 


523 


458 


1,001 


2,795 


2,582 


2,539 


2,718 


1,843 


1,842 












65 




15 








47 


43 




102 


104 


48 


87 


30 


41 














40 


45 








43 


52 






88 


100 


88 


112 






4 






28 


8 






535 




45 




443 


119 


71 


289 


661 


600 


515 


542 


397 


373 


5 


11 


25 


'7 


104 






443 




25 




417 


49 


121 


231 


636 


582 


620 


706 


407 


464 





34 


42 










217 




27 




161 


115 


108 


184 


262 


238 


277 


246 


191 


196 


' 


8 


24 










225 








155 


78 


115 


119 


275 


253 


263 


268 


218 


217 


s 


52 


50 










189 








128 


20 


21 


31 


221 


188 


178 


232 


180 


155 




20 


50 










252 




39 




206 


47 


22 


147 


254 


228 


254 


236 


240 


213 


10 














116 








106 








116 


106 


116 


106 






1 1 






























99 


87 


99 


87 


99 


87 


12 






























81 


96 


81 


96 


81 


96 


13 


889 


1,153 


"230 


°158 




39 


4,839 


8 


229 




4,250 


252 


479 


1,678 


7,061 


6,022 


3,820 


4,339 


3,276 


2,774 


14 


148 


162 










421 




180 




117 


233 


149 


441 


642 


235 


143 


424 


175 


159 


15 


28 


48 


74 


4i 






108 








73 


7 


74 


119 


323 


268 


60 


70 


39 


15 


16 


116 


165 


35 


23 






155 








83 


12 


91 


265 


312 


254 


104 


230 


60 


61 


17 


51 


52 








39 


153 








223 




47 


117 


241 


182 


215 


227 


124 


135 


18 


122 


201 


39 


28 






493 








593 




77 


248 


723 


678 


479 


492 


623 


463 


19 


133 


154 


"60 


°10 






324 








180 




28 


259 


127 


128 


59 


61 


16 


18 


20 














424 








385 








717 


634 


132 


127 


149 


119 


21 


74 


i27 


22 


56 






633 




49 




613 




i3 


229 


454 


384 


544 


607 


76 


35 


22 


10 


7 










370 








350 








600 


541 


328 


283 


328 


292 


23 


23 


33 










681 








639 








998 


955 


227 


367 


163 


146 


24 


97 


100 










507 








476 








792 


738 


778 


721 


778 


721 


25 


87 


104 










570 








518 








924 


849 


543 


554 


537 


434 


26 






























208 


176 


208 


176 


208 


176 


27 


1,866 


2,469 


»1193 


a 1023 


37 


279 


11,315 


11 


t362 


73 


10,006 




1,212 


4,246 


19,092 


18,556 


12,488 


12,792 


12,075 


11,378 


28 


77 


115 


112 


73 






689 








507 




228 


545 


849 


850 


137 


226 


78 


102 


29 


184 


291 


80 


68 






347 








266 




147 


405 


832 


902 


114 


154 


85 


108 


30 


26 


53 


19 


17 






174 




40 




75 




76 


203 


272 


293 


35 


44 


26 


41 


31 


123 


239 


»167 


al57 






236 




44 




239 




196 


285 


811 


877 


109 


209 


106 


132 


32 


116 


113 


126 


103 






498 




34 




308 




65 


451 


957 


940 


109 


307 


78 


55 


33 


130 


111 


77 


37 






447 




t77 




331 




92 


697 


1,076 


1.029 


147 


229 


213 


101 


34 


120 


144 


169 


101 






686 




$112 




408 




180 


806 


1,295 


1,153 


120 


342 


123 


72 


35 


121 


123 










285 








230 




53 


124 


573 


505 


403 


328 


355 


285 


36 


102 


123 


58 


42 






394 








357 




41 


129 


665 


667 


505 


462 


411 


430 


37 


22 


25 










276 




28 




246 




10 


90 


434 


439 


366 


370 


326 


332 


38 


104 


110 










532 




J27 




382 




48 


235 


916 


854 


675 


656 


629 


546 


39 


38 


73 


74 


86 






381 








401 








589 


578 


525 


491 


511 


507 


40 


72 


85 


38 


55 






601 








544 




45 


26i 


860 


805 


566 


612 


595 


525 


41 














47 








49 








47 


49 


47 


49 


47 


49 


42 


122 


148 


39 


37 






591 








634 








964 


965 


884 


868 


869 


860 


43 


30 


43 










384 








360 








556 


542 


556 


542 


555 


530 


44 


80 


144 


36 


21 






489 








491 








742 


729 


714 


690 


657 


613 


45 


64 


99 


48 


26 






325 








328 








567 


535 


462 


428 


463 


430 


46 


72 


86 










697 








745 








1,111 


1,130 


1,111 


1,130 


1,111 


1,130 


47 


37 


39 


34 


57 






489 








439 








755 


665 


755 


665 


687 


583 


48 


27 


57 










542 








494 








825 


736 


822 


728 


825 


736 


49 


20 


21 


'59 


'88 






461 








469 








731 


722 


715 


686 


705 


696 


60 


90 


134 


23 


17 






639 








605 








922 


873 


868 


858 


877 


797 


51 


32 


39 


34 


38 






622 








620 








875 


808 


875 


808 


875 


808 


52 


57 


54 










483 








478 








868 


910 


868 


910 


868 


910 


53 


42 


66 








95 


347 








373 


70 


116 


193 


701 


553 


463 


490 


231 


133 


54 


24 


32 










235 








212 




56 


104 


275 


179 


154 


144 






55 


18 


34 








■95 


112 








156 


'76 


60 


89 


302 


233 


246 


210 


i67 




56 






















5 








61 


67 




62 


61 


■59 


67 






























63 


74 


63 


74 


63 


74 


68 


39 


42 


20 


19 




209 


642 








609 




218 


397 


823 


791 


615 


696 


275 


279 


69 


16 


24 








107 


172 








110 




138 


199 


225 


204 


127 


178 


84 


94 


60 
61 


23 


18 








60 


98 








109 




25 


109 


152 


173 


150 


183 
20 
















21 


36 








61 




23 


38 


74 


79 


15 






62 






'26 






21 


145 








144 




32 


51 


181 


150 


132 


130 






63 
164 














76 








62 








76 


62 


76 


62 


■76 


62 














93 








96 








93 


96 


93 


96 


93 


96 


165 














22 








27 








22 


27 


22 


27 


22 


27 



236 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



1 

1 


i 

Total 










Social 




1 


Mathe- 








EnroU- 


Core 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 




ment 


























XT f k U 1 






























g 


Q 


B 


G 


B 1 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


66 Carroll 


2,392 


2,475 


350 


297 


2,032 


2,170 


2,003 


2,162 


2,200 


2,104 


1,983 


1.933 


27 


76 


67 Francis Scott Key Sr . . . 


184 


201 






184 


201 


165 


199 


150 


153 


111 


128 






68 Westminster Sr 


487 


540 






487 


540 


487 


540 


440 


438 


329 


349 


'27 


'76 


69 North Carroll iSr 


227 


249 






227 


249 


222 


243 


174 


173 


144 


144 






70 Mount Airy Sr 


129 


163 






129 


163 


124 


163 


106 


118 


100 


103 






71 Taneytown Sr.-Jr 


202 


204 






202 


204 


202 


204 


177 


165 


177 


169 






72 Sykesville Sr.-Jr 


280 


280 






280 


280 


280 


280 


270 


231 


250 


222 






73 Robert Mot on Sr.-Jr. . . 


94 


111 


44 


42 


50 


69 


50 


69 


94 


99 


83 


91 






74 Charles Carroll Jr . , . 


44 


43 


44 


43 










'i'i 


to 


AA 


AQ 






75 Manchester Jr 


99 


80 


39 


20 


'60 


'60 


'60 


'60 


99 


80 


99 


80 






76 W estminster Jr 


339 


308 


13 


6 
20 


316 


294 


316 


294 


339 


308 


339 


308 






77 Hampstead Jr 


72 


70 


33 


39 


50 


39 


50 


72 


70 


72 


70 






78 New Windsor Jr 


69 


62 


52 


50 


17 


12 


17 


12 


69 


62 


69 


62 






79 Elmer A. Wolfe Jr . . . . 


60 


56 


60 


56 










60 


56 


60 


56 






80 Mount Airy Jr 


106 


108 


65 


60 


ii 


'48 


ii 


'48 


106 


108 


106 


108 






81 Cecil 


1,914 


1,970 






1,913 


1,970 


1,903 


1.961 


1,732 


1,649 


1,689 


1,582 


48 


80 


82 Elkton Sr 


206 


207 






206 


207 


197 


200 


139 


121 


142 


87 


2 


12 


83 Bohemia Manor Sr.-Jr . 


247 


255 






246 


255 


245 


253 


222 


217 


201 


207 






84 Perry ville Sr.-Jr 


250 


298 






250 


298 


250 


298 


214 


224 


229 


249 


"29 


'37 


85 North East Sr.-Jr 


341 


369 






341 


369 


341 


369 


315 


300 


299 


300 


17 


36 


86 Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 


386 


389 






386 


389 


386 


389 


358 


335 


334 


287 






87 G. W. Carver Sr.-Jr . . . 


82 


78 






82 


78 


82 


78 


82 


78 


82 


78 






88 Elkton Jr 


402 


374 






402 


374 


402 


374 


402 


374 


402 


374 






89 Charles 


1 524 


1,523 


336 


285 


1,188 


1,237 


1,125 


1,176 


1,310 


1,315 


1.273 


1,186 


88 


73 


90 La Plata Sr.-Jr 


'428 


'423 






428 


423 


428 


423 


369 


329 


336 


279 


32 




91 Bel Alton Sr.-Jr 


190 


226 


53 


"48 


137 


177 


125 


166 


156 


198 


168 


174 






92 Pomonkey Sr.-Jr . 


353 


320 


186 


152 


167 


168 


116 


125 


258 


283 


261 


251 






93 Lackey Sr.-Jr 


360 


352 






360 


352 


360 


345 


334 


303 


315 


280 


'56 


'39 


94 Nanjemoy Jr 


42 


32 


42 


■32 










42 


32 


42 


32 






95 Glasva Jr 


36 


37 






'36 


'37 


'36 


'37 


36 


37 


36 


37 






96 Hughesville Jr 


46 


49 






46 


49 


46 


49 


46 


49 


46 


49 






97 Malcolm Jr 


69 


84 


55 


'53 


14 


31 


14 


31 


69 


84 


69 


84 






98 Dorchester 


1,371 
323 


1,321 


159 


142 


1,212 


1,179 


1,187 


1,143 


1,165 


1,083 


1,132 


980 


47 


78 


99 Cambridge Sr 


344 






323 


344 


322 


343 


238 


222 


232 


204 


30 


40 


100 No. Dorchester Sr.-Jr . . 


281 


283 


'60 


"55 


221 


228 


219 


227 


227 


225 


212 


202 


17 


38 


101 So. Dorchester Sr.- Jr... 


114 


105 






114 


105 


114 


104 


109 


79 


92 


65 






102 Mace's Lane Sr.-Jr. .. . 


377 


324 


"99 


'87 


278 


237 


256 


204 


315 


292 


320 


244 






103 Cambridge Jr 


223 


222 






223 


222 


223 


222 


223 


222 


223 


222 






104 St. Clair Elem.-Jr 


53 


43 






53 


43 


53 


43 


53 


43 


53 


43 






105 Frederick 


3,374 


3,228 


2,066 


1.945 


1.308 


1,283 


1,133 


1,131 


2,871 


2,647 


2,831 


2,669 


213 


256 


106 Frederick Sr 


'673 


'648 






673 


648 


564 


537 


511 


461 


403 


363 


67 


64 


107 Lincoln Sr 


68 


82 






68 


82 


68 


82 


60 


58 


17 


58 






108 Middletown Sr.-Jr 


355 


385 


206 


205 


149 


180 


124 


173 


302 


328 


310 


311 


'i4 


'46 


109 Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 


127 


101 


79 


57 


48 


44 


48 


44 


108 


85 


119 


95 






1 10 Thurmont Sr -Jr 


362 


325 


227 


206 


135 


119 


99 


90 


317 


267 


321 


270 


38 


'44 


1 1 1 Brunswick Sr.-Jr 


273 


278 


165 


167 


108 


111 


106 


107 


227 


207 


226 


218 






112 Walkersville Sr.-Jr. . . . 


311 


289 


184 


190 


127 


99 


124 


98 


296 


265 


242 


240 


5 


"5 


113 Elm Street Jr 


304 


259 


304 


259 










252 


209 


304 


259 


33 


31 


114 West Frederick Jr 


812 


772 


812 


772 










709 


678 


800 


766 


56 


66 


115 Liberty Jr 


89 


89 


89 


89 










89 


89 


89 


89 






116 Garrett 


1,051 


1,009 


225 


183 


822 


825 


824 


825 


951 


795 


918 


777 


19 


32 


117 No. Garrett Sr.-Jr 


403 


356 


156 


122 


245 


233 


245 


233 


375 


276 


342 


275 


19 


32 


118 So. Garrett Sr.-Jr 


579 


592 






577 


592 


579 


592 


507 


458 


507 


441 






119 Route 40 Jr 


26 


28 


'26 


"28 










26 


28 


26 


28 






120 KitzmillerJr 


43 


33 


43 


33 










43 


33 


43 


33 






121 Harford 


3.619 


3,588 


2,045 


1,992 


1,566 
628 


1,596 


1.473 


1.511 


2,698 


2.539 


3.253 


3.008 


233 


280 


122 Bel Air Sr.-Jr 


1,078 


1,077 


450 


1 406 


671 


579 


616 


913 


849 


937 


862 


75 


, 102 


123 Edgewood Sr.-Jr 


521 


515 


314 


324 


199 


191 


207 


189 


328 


310 


508 


411 


35 


35 


1 24 Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr . . 


438 


473 


! 283 


' 292 


155 


181 


140 


181 


302 


301 


388 


389 


56: 59 




674 


678 


422 


446 


252 


232 


251 


232 


497 


463 


597 


590 


44 


52 


126 Central Consol. Sr.-Jr. . 


222 


171 


134 


1 112 


88 


59 


80 


50 


173 


122 


199 


149 






127 North Harford Sr.-Jr . . 


522 


525 


346 


315 


176 


210 


150 


191 


344 


356 


469 


464 


23 32 


128 Havre de Grace 






























Consolidated Sr.-Jr. . 


164 


149 


96 


97 


68 


52 


66 


52 


141 


138 


155 


143 




1 



Maryland State Department of Education 237 



laryland County Public High School: Fall of 1960 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art— Arts 
and Crafts 


Gen. 


t 

Voc. 


Arts 


Edut 


General 


Voc. 




B 


G 




G 


B 


B 


B 





B 


B 




G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




G 


6 


185 


245 






123 


1,485 


...j 40l ... 


1 , 27o 


166 


1 

433 


830 


2,183 


2,130 


1 , / 47 


1,994 


799 


704 


7 


19 


22 








59 


117 




1 IC 


44 


46 


117 


158 


138 


164 


185, 




8 


45 


89 










358 




40 




242 


41 


152 


297 


349 


373 


186 


272 


67 


li4 


9 


26 


36 








31 


132 








138 


■ • " 


92 


150 


219 


214 


128 


207 









25 


27 








33 


65 








82 


IS 


49 


119 


118 


115 


62 


117 






1 


28 


35 










135 








107 


17 


41 


58 


201 


198 


183 


173 


42! 37 


2 


42 


31 










164 








131 


• • • 


35 


63 


255 


255 


141 


202 


70, 69 


3 




5 










73 








38 


45 


18 


26 


94 


110 


94 


111 


21 1 23 


4 














25 








25 








441 43 


44 


43 


19 


18 


5 














47 








43 








99 


80 


99 


80 


521 37 


6 














182 








161 








339 


308 


339 


308 


339 


308 


7 














72 








70 








72 


70 


72 


70 






8 














69 








28 








69 


62 


69 


62 


'69 


'34 


9 














■ ■ • 








56 








60 


56 


60 


56 


60 



















46 








44 








106 


108 


106 


108 


60 


'64 


1 


120 


131 


88 


83 




Too 


1,393 


1 


J21 




1.217 


111 


348 


706 


1,649 


1,593 


921 


922 


3941 367 


2 


47 


50 








100 




+21 




■ ■ ■ 


47 


95 


207 


145 


95 


29 




26 


20 


3 


26 


31 








'24 


173 


"i 






151 


24 


45 


78 


211 


198 


85 


90 


82 i 83 


4 


15 


14 


• • • 








222 








01 7 


14 


37 


74 


211 


251 


165 


165 






J 






38 


33 






226 








243 




74 


137 


234 


236 


201 


192 


i26 


130 


S 






50 


50 




TD4 


250 








247 




91 


191 




371 


181 


223 






7 












82 








50 


Oft 


6 


19 


1 9 


RQ 
08 


72 


60 






S 


32 


'36 










340 








309 








392 


374 


188 


166 


160 


134 


3 


101 


117 






53 


24o 


517 








661 


93 


219 


406 


1,222 


1,084 


823 


874 


460 


250 


) 


30 


26 








59 


94 








251 




105 


174 


310 


219 


220 


235 


148 


5 


1 


14 


18 








71 


89 








82 


'46 


5 


30 


165 


182 


87 


93 


40 




2 


42 


57 








100 


182 








43 


53 


43 


94 




910 


159 


199 


181 


i55 


J 


15 


16 










41 








144 




66 


108 


321 


253 


166 


145 




61 


1 














42 








• • • 








42 


28 


42 


32 






5 










'22 












37 








36 


37 


36 


37 


'i4 




3 










31 


■ • i 
lo 


•■■ 








49 








46 


49 


46 


49 






7 














69 








55 








69 


84 


67 


84 




'29 


3 


151 


181 








115 


657 






2 


546 


54 


213 


395 


1,255 


1.106 


897 


01 7 


394 


401 


i 


75 


87 








• • • 


169 








182 




130 


167 




OQl 


162 


197 


139 


160 


3 


30 


42 








41 


191 








175 




66 


102 


215 


180 


192 


215 






L 














97 








51 




11 


48 


105 


81 






'32 


'19 


\ 


46 


52 








'74 


200 






"2 


138 


'54 


6 


78 


347 


296 


267 


240 






> 






























223 


222 


223 


222 


223 


222 


1 






























53 


43 


53 


43 






) 


261 


321 


44 


45 






1,823 








1,754 




601 


865 


3,009 


2,641 


1,957 


110 


1,483 


1.361 


) 


121 


134 








104 


292 








279 




290 


401 


440 


296 


112 


120 


74 


79 


■ 














63 








61 




• • • 


16 


68 


82 


47 


56 


19 


16 










45 




59 


146 








122 




54 


117 


288 


247 


230 


275 


164 


194 


) 


8 


7 








• • • 


98 








101 








127 


101 


103 


82 


79 


57 


) 


6 


9 








ToS 


197 








153 




95 


161 


362 


325 


222 


264 


192 


156 




38 


61 








77 








58 




87 


98 


241 


234 


90 


121 


64 


47 




45 


65 








/5 


118 








215 




75 


72 


294 


254 


226 


292 


173 


177 


; 


15 


18 










186 








169 








304 


259 


276 


236 


246 


209 


[ 


28 


27 










557 








507 








796 


754 


562 


577 


472 


426 
















89 








89 








89 


89 


89 


89 








78 


71 








190 


577 








487 


131 


128 


342 


736 


542 


608 


678 


367 


274 














118 


263 






... 


231 




21 


107 


272 


196 


238 


262 








78 


71 








72 


314 








256 


131 


107 


235 


395 


285 


344 


388 


298 


2i.3 


» 






























26 


28 


26 




26 


28 




... 




























43 


33 






43 


33 




368 


440 


154 


107 




185 


2,072 


11 


40 


4 


1,656 




556 


1,193 


2,648 


2,335 


2,199 


2.351 


1.493 


1.659 




133 


170 


69 


63 




66 


610 


1 






457 




149 


363 


807 


686 


632 


631 


542 


579 




28 


32 


32 


14 






322 


3 






232 




56 


200 


381 


336 


336 


372 


112 


113 




43 


58 










214 




"46 




196 




73 


184 


320 


298 


238 


274 


245 


266 


i 


107 


82 


53 


'30 






384 


"2 






307 




98 


124 


490 


481 


350 


454 


307 


342 




12 


21 










132 






"4 


93 




55 


45 


205 


147 


181 


160 


80 


61 




28 


52 








ii9 


286 








250 




73 


232 


303 


279 


339 


36S 


116 


215 




17 


25 










124 


5 






121 




52 


45 


142 


108 


123 


92 


91 


S3 



238 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 



Local Unit 
Name of High School 



Total 










Social 






Mathe- 






Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


ment 


























rS 




B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1,681 


1,563 




oou 






1 08C 


1 017 


1,111 


1 303 




1 901 


70 

tv 


ii 


370 


352 






370 


352 


'347 


'322 


286 


'207 


299 


204 


32 


26 


416 


382 


i47 


i28 


269 


253 


319 


288 


365 


320 


376 


311 


17 


37 


219 


237 


99 


100 


120 


137 


120 


137 


180 


198 


172 


198 






272 


231 


188 


157 


84 


74 


85 


74 


253 


222 


253 


222 






366 


331 


157 


135 


209 


196 


209 


196 


355 


326 


355 


326 


'21 


'ii 


38 


30 


38 


30 










38 


30 


38 


30 






685 


732 






685 


732 


685 


732 


587 


655 


592 


620 


20 


30 


101 


111 






101 


111 


101 


111 


98 


102 


82 


84 


3 


9 


309 


298 






309 


298 


309 


298 


250 


264 


274 


246 


17 


21 


172 


215 






172 


215 


172 


215 


149 


200 


143 


193 






103 


108 






103 


108 


103 


108 


90 


89 


93 


97 






15, 619 


15, 459 


13 


3 


15, 595 


15, 450 


13, 967 


13, 596 


9, 765 


8, 751 


13, 820 


12, 253 


996 


1,153 


687 


670 






687 


670 


589 


580 


465 


422 


390 


347 


40 


48 


1,039 


1,030 






1,039 
961 


1,030 


772 


724 


779 


693 


849 


584 


114 


150 


961 


947 






947 


698 


662 


730 


662 


781 


535 


117 


121 


458 


478 






457 


478 


414 


388 


328 


315 


285 


298 


20 


39 


1.169 


1,265 






1,167 


1,264 


801 


847 


900 


810 


860 


575 


103 


126 


867 


848 






867 


848 


689 


652 


596 


440 


665 


396 


72 


71 


890 


791 






889 


791 


637 


515 


708 


537 


655 


428 


59 


78 


179 


193 






179 


193 


161 


177 


113 


113 


141 


145 






660 


652 






DOU 


652 


010 


526 


428 


386 


562 


461 


79 


68 


288 


270 






288 


270 


277 


248 


127 


124 


247 


200 






399 


355 






399 


355 


378 


330 


224 


206 


376 


328 


'i9 


'39 


390 


390 






390 


390 


386 


387 


183 


183 


390 


389 


16 


19 


769 


687 


'i3 


"3 


756 


684 


756 


684 


316 


302 


756 


684 






537 


547 






537 


547 


537 


547 


273 


243 


537 


547 


'32 


'48 


702 


744 






702 


744 


695 


744 


359 


350 


702 


744 


43 


50 


774 


757 






767 


752 


769 


756 


352 


285 


774 


757 


68 


73 


371 


387 






371 


387 


367 


387 


143 


200 


371 


387 






494 


511 






494 


511 


489 


507 


261 


226 


494 


511 


*i6 


'23 


571 


689 






0/ 1 


i^ao 
ooy 


0/ 1 


589 


279 


261 


571 


589 


37 


34 


689 


653 






689 


653 


689 


653 


526 


469 


689 


653 


43 


50 


620 


672 






620 


672 


614 


670 


293 


317 


620 


672 


41 


42 


702 


744 






702 


744 


702 


744 


360 


346 


702 


744 


29 


21 


711 


672 






711 


672 


711 


672 


373 


327 


711 


672 


16 


33 


692 


607 






692 


607 


692 


607 


049 


534 


692 


607 


32 


20 


14,954 


14,534 


9,761 


9,124 


5,191 


5.408 


4,648 


4,817 


6,851 


5,780 


13,268 


11,316 


337 


349 


733 


779 


733 


779 


541 


721 


434 


335 


510 


373 


42 


37 


936 


754 






934 


754 


814 


595 


576 


285 


623 


280 


58 


40 


878 


903 






878 


903 


854 


882 


742 


517 


635 


380 


57 


81 


389 


424 


140 


i3i 


249 


293 


249 


291 


373 


285 


377 


298 


15 


20 


437 


474 






437 


474 


433 


458 


347 


295 


360 


201 


31 


35 


553 


609 


236 


236 


317 


373 


274 


330 


463 


461 


463 


341 


33 


33 


1,000 


1,061 






1,000 


1,061 


858 


780 


696 


498 


749 


569 


84 


88 


155 


217 






155 


217 


148 


217 


132 


148 


105 


90 


11 


12 


272 


306 


174 


181 


98 


125 


97 


125 


120 


119 


228 


233 






238 


216 


73 


82 


165 


134 


171 


136 


201 


147 


208 


136 






363 


343 


251 


219 


112 


124 


96 


112 


157 


137 


310 


250 


"6 


3 


426 


481 


313 


310 


113 


171 


113 


170 


162 


191 


406 


427 






983 


920 


983 


918 










400 


380 


782 


726 






351 


329 


351 


329 










92 


96 


351 


329 






576 


518 


576 


518 










171 


143 


576 


518 






516 


419 


516 


419 










128 


127 


503 


415 






469 


467 


469 


467 










157 


140 


457 


464 






441 


417 


441 


417 










128 


127 


441 


417 






370 


345 


370 


345 














363 


340 






173 


189 


173 


189 














162 


187 






431 


390 


431 


390 










i62 


107 


431 


390 






367 


367 


367 


367 










106 


103 


367 


367 






270 


275 


270 


275 










72 


73 


270 


275 






588 


541 


588 


541 










361 


353 


588 


541 






495 


414 


495 


414 










164 


140 


495 


414 






506 


445 


506 


445 










160 


149 


496 


439 






491 


462 


491 


462 










139 


129 


476 


449 






652 


613 


652 


613 














652 


613 






470 


439 


470 


439 










150 


163 


470 


439 






356 


349 


356 


349 








" ' ' 


98 


107 


345 


347 






69 


68 


69 


68 










20 


25 


69 


681 







129 Howard. 



130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 



Howard County Sr . . . 

Glenelg Sr.-Jr/. 

Harriet Tubman Sr.-Jr 

Waterloo Jr 

EUicott City Jr 

Lisbon Eleni.-.Jr 



136 Kent. 



137 
138 
139 
140 



Galena Sr.-Jr . . . . 
Chestertown Sr.-J 
Garnett Sr.-Jr . . 
Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 



141 Montgomery 

142 Rich. Montgomery Sr. . 

143 Bethesda-Chevv 

Chase Sr 

144 Walter Johnson Sr . . . . 

145 Gaithersburg Sr . ..... . 

1 46 Montgomery Blair Sr . . 

147 WheatonSr 

148 North wood Sr 

149 Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

150 Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

1.51 Damascus Sr.-Jr 

152 Robert Peary Sr.- Jr.. . 

153 Springbrook Jr 

154 Edwin W. Broome Jr. . 

155 Leland Jr 

156 Western Jr 

157 North Bethesda Jr ... . 

158 Gaithersburg Jr 

159 Takoma Park Jr 

160 Montgomery Hills Jr. . 

161 Kensington Jr 

162 Eastern Jr 

163 SligoJr 

164 Colonel Joseph Belt Jr . 

165 Newport Jr 

166 Prince George's 

167 High Point Sr 

168 Bladensburg Sr 

169 Suitland Sr 

170 Surrattsville Sr 

171 Oxon HiU Sr 

172 Du Val Sr 

173 Northwestern Sr 

174 Central Sr 

175 Frederick Sasscer 

Sr.-Jr 

176 Laurel Sr.-Jr 

177 Gwynn Park Sr.- Jr 

178 Douglass Sr.-Jr 

1 79 Fairmont Hgts. Sr.-Jr . . 

180 BeltsvilleJr 

181 Bladensburg Jr 

182 Suitland Jr 

1 83 Benjamin Stoddert Jr . . 

1 84 Francis Scott Key Jr . . . 

185 Surrattsville Jr 

186 Laurel Jr 

187 Oxon Hill Jr 

188 John Hanson Jr 

189 KentJr 

190 Hyattsville Jr 

191 Mt. Rainier Jr 

192 Rollingcrest Jr 

193 Maryland Park Jr 

194 Glenridge Jr 

195 Greenbelt Jr 

196 Buck Lodge Jr 

197 Lakeland Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 239 



Maryland County Public High School: FaU of 1960 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Physical 
Education 


Music 


Art— Arts 
and Crafts 


* 

Gen. 


t 

Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


1 

B 


G 


B 


G 


00 




235 


1 

4ll 


1 

50 


*14 


t95 


927 


11 


29 




836 


27 


114 


526 


1430 


1,208 


1,025 


1,042 


416 


446 


<in 
.ou 


i\7 
01 


83 








38 


182 


1 






127 




55 


257 


195 


114 


88 


116 


53 


84 


fit 
.til 


fit 


64 


41 


56 






341 








319 








366 


331 


366 


331 


228 


206 




00 


43 






*i4 


t57 


193 


io 






185 




34 


i72 


376 


309 


142 


181 


41 


81 


loo 


Q 


19 










89 








94 


27 


25 


97 


182 


193 


152 


172 






lO* 




26 










122 








111 








273 


231 


239 


212 


94 


75 


.00 






























38 


30 


38 


30 






LOO 




80 








99 


367 








420 




120 


171 


590 


629 


495 


498 


255 


256 


iol 














91 








89 




23 


35 


101 




90 


100 


52 


50 


'138 


28 


'39 








'74 


102 








118 




45 


72 


224 


226 


185 


193 


86 


73 


i l39 


11 


30 








25 


95 








139 




48 


60 


162 


184 


148 


164 


61 


86 




Q 


11 










79 








74 




4 


4 


103 


108 


72 


41 


56 


47 


4 1 


3 389 


4,765 
66 


°1056 


°1008 


*116 


164 


7,739 


241 


t655 




5,267 


234 


1,674 


3,384 


13,284 


12,146 


4,630 


4,934 


2,267 


3,239 


4* 


38 


76 


65 






359 


2 


tl47 




239 


37 


200 


418 


558 


489 


77 


137 


38 


87 


4;{ 


189 


368 


°193 


"204 






535 


11 


t32 




102 




229 


378 


834 


760 


195 


369 


76 


216 


44 


214 


336 


°224 


°223 






504 


8 






328 




179 


293 


746 


457 


245 


345 


70 


205 


45 


13 


39 


48 


51 




'gi 


165 




tii2 




93 




128 


279 


333 


240 


112 


172 


39 


67 


;4(i 


220 


286 


°215 


°229 






623 


'66 


tlOO 




271 


"62 


253 


547 


636 


532 


184 


204 


137 


287 


'47 


110 


148 


106 


81 






506 


70 


{225 




115 


76 


92 


390 


579 


420 


221 


190 


63 


89 


l4S 


193 


205 


°146 


°115 






605 


38 






229 




170 


307 


505 


438 


165 


241 


94 


193 


149 


44 


55 






'26 


'46 


50 








52 




27 


60 


168 


141 


35 


79 


37 


59 


150 


87 


123 


"48 


'46 






321 


'22 


'39 




117 


'59 


65 


240 


561 


475 


175 


221 


82 


151 


151 


65 


73 






*74 


33 


217 








115 




29 


72 


250 


186 


64 


132 


71 


110 


152 


71 


83 










155 








118 




22 


28 


373 


347 


117 


126 


84 


75 


153 


124 


158 










187 


"2 






180 








383 


389 


129 


116 


76 


87 


154 


200 


222 










308 








273 








756 


684 


279 


239 


163 


176 


1155 


193 


241 










206 


7 






175 




'74 


"76 


519 


530 


449 


376 


184 


193 




190 


283 










305 








280 




66 


98 


680 


707 


235 


235 


90 


128 




246 


340 










334 








262 




72 


101 


622 


640 


362 


343 


164 


168 


1 T)^ 


38 


64 






'22 




163 








190 








371 


387 


154 


126 


53 


71 


1 .") ' 1 


1 16 


174 










237 


"8 






277 








489 


497 


103 


119 


51 


59 


1 liO 


167 


247 










241 








270 








545 


566 


192 


164 


138 


155 


1 t)l 


189 


288 










292 


"i 






249 




'68 


103 


663 


610 


233 


201 


89 


102 




190 


245 










302 


1 






348 








620 


664 


192 


184 


120 


132 


1 


212 


330 










382 








366 








690 


709 


225 


194 


126 


180 


1 1)4 


144 


197 










379 








306 








711 


672 


292 


264 


110 


128 


1 1)5 


136 


194 










363 


'5 






312 








692 


606 


195 


157 


1 12 


121 


1 till 


1 ,010 


1,320 


°1270 


°1088 


9 


145 


9,706 


16 


11117 




8,017 


1,453 


1,642 


4,170 


12,587 


11,264 


6,984 


7,131 
196 


6,509 


6,197 


1(57 


106 


156 


°170 


°108 






337 








50 


102 


216 


353 


419 


369 


95 


62 


' 108 


i 168 


83 


100 


°131 


°112 






224 


"3 


{894 






353 


237 


744 


427 


410 


94 


123 


102 


136 


1 i 60 


132 


129 


167 


135 


. . . 




275 








104 


201 


349 


650 


440 


201 


96 


240 


130 


174 


1 70 


S(i 


100 


38 


53 






121 










106 


40 


199 


337 


246 


79 


91 


48 


65 


1 7 1 


107 


134 


103 


82 






179 


'9 








186 


175 


305 


233 


183 


59 


52 


41 


74 


1 72 


57 


70 


165 


89 






213 








ii3 


132 


79 


258 


481 


508 


133 


142 


119 


117 


1 7'A 


114 


178 


220 


194 






567 


'4 






20 


207 


203 


786 


664 


516 


195 


342 


164 


179 


1 74 


14 


23 


26 


29 






45 








34 


65 


89 


187 


108 


78 


30 


57 


41 


38 


1 "') 




1 


46 


44 


9 


47 


100 








110 




62 


121 


261 


286 


179 


183 


144 


149 


i7t; 


45 


47 


27 


12 






130 








114 




70 


96 


205 


157 


85 


88 


50 


61 




29 


34 








'30 


219 








211 




40 


175 


338 


275 


163 


149 


211 


181 


1 7S 






37 


42 




68 


306 








292 


'89 


21 


96 


402 


413 


256 


243 


196 


266 




'6i 


'84 


23 


56 






598 




1223 




603 


12 


61 


200 


788 


708 


549 


523 


595 


448 


ISO 


6 


21 










351 








329 








344 


308 


239 


197 


318 


310 


ISl 


40 


40 










524 








473 








576 


518 


333 


301 


272 


258 


1H2 






'35 


"ie 






286 








402 








516 


417 


290 


257 


275 


178 


i.s:5 


'i8 


'27 


14 


12 






457 








464 








454 


463 


239 


235 


224 


207 


184 


13 


31 


11 








439 








416 








440 


411 


269 


252 


299 


283 


185 














363 








340 








363 


340 


363 


340 


363 


340 


186 














162 








187 








173 


189 


112 


134 


136 


145 


187 


"io 


'io 




'is 






240 








221 








416 


361 


303 


248 


214 


212 


I8S 


9 


21 


9 


7 






195 








218 








367 


367 


208 


218 


197 


180 


189 














174 








275 








268 


274 


218 


223 


183 


196 


190 


'21 


'23 


"5 


*i9 






562 








499 








588 541 


356 


348 


232 


193 


M91 






19 


30 






468 








398 








495 


414 


267 


199 


282 


230 


i92 


"\7 


'si 


17 


26 






478 








394 








496 


439 


339 


353 


286 


257 


193 














476 








449 








487 


451 


382 


362 


274 


221 


194 














494 








450 








639 


605 


415 


391 


429 


400 


195 


'i8 


'17 










309 








436 








467 


430 


354 


334 


253 


230 


196 


18 


30 










345 








347 








326 


318 


229 


252 


306 


308 


97 


5 


13 










69 








68 








69 


68 


55 


58 


63 


53 



240 Ninety-Fifth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each 





Total 










Social 






Mathe- 






Local Unit 


Enroli- 


Core 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


— 


ment 


























Name of High School 






























B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


198 Queen Anne's 


776 


789 


95 


82 


681 


706 


658 


660 


650 


6/0 


606 


591 






199 Sudlersville Sr -Jr 


171 


169 






171 


169 


171 


168 


153 


146 


117 


115 






200 Centreville Sr -Jr 


ZDS 


9KR 






258 


256 


241 


220 


214 


225 


223 


201 






201 Kennard Sr -Jr 




1 OQ 

lyo 


95 


82 


123 


116 


123 


116 


179 


164 


152 


152 






202 Stevensville Sr -Jr 


1 90 


1 RR 
lOD 






129 


165 


123 


156 


104 


135 


114 


123 






203 St. Mary's 


1,200 


1,236 






1,200 


1,236 
198 


1,189 


1,226 


1,119 


1,091 


994 


939 






204 Leonardtown Sr.-Jr 


OflK 
Mo 


1 OQ 

lyo 






205 


205 


198 


169 


181 


165 


154 






205 Banneker Sr.-Jr 


one 


1 7R 
WD 






208 


176 


208 


176 


185 


141 


150 


118 






206 Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr 


91 IL 


91 O 

ziy 






214 


219 


203 


209 


210 


186 


182 


150 






207 Great Mills Sr.-Jr " 


loo 


OUO 






433 


503 


433 


503 


419 


459 


379 


397 






208 Carver Sr.-Jr 


1 An 


1 ,40 
11U 






140 


140 


140 


140 


136 


124 


118 


120 






209 Somerset 


you 


001 


368 


341 


562 


680 


572 


684 


009 


007 


coo 
ooU 


795 


5 


_ 


210 Washington Sr - Jr 


1 00 


91 9 


82 


84 


106 


128 


106 


128 


168 


192 


161 


173 






21 1 Marion Sr - Jr 


ft9 




26 


26 


36 


22 


30 


16 


00 


44 


KR 


45 






212 Woodson Sr - Jr 


on 

yy 


1 on 


26 


25 


73 


75 


73 


78 


86 


93 


95 


91 


• • ■ 




213 Crisfield Sr -Jr 


9Q7 


loo 


142 


134 


95 


101 


92 


97 


208 


200 


224 


204 


5 




214 Deal Island Sr.-Jr 


5/ 


55 


33 


25 


24 


30 


24 


30 


57 


54 


A'7 


41 






215 Somerset Sr - Jr 


266 


251 


59 


47 


207 


204 


226 


215 


240 


234 


226 


221 






216 Ewell Jr 


21 


20 






21 


20 


21 


20 


21 


20 


21 


20 






217 Talbot 


859 


879 


103 


106 


756 


773 


769 


789 


774 


774 


670 


693 




10 


218 Easton Sr -Jr 


A K1 


iio 






451 


475 


470 


605 


387 


401 


381 


383 


7 


10 


219 Robt.R.Moton Sr.-Jr. 


223 


235 


103 


106 


120 


129 


120 


129 


223 


235 


159 


186 






220 St. Michael's Sr.-Jr... . 


1 CK 

loo 


1 RO 

loy 






185 


169 


179 


155 


164 


138 


130 


124 








4,370 


4,0.59 


1.864 


1,699 


2,506 


2,357 


2,359 


2,227 


3,656 


3,170 


3.647 


3,235 


246 


399 


222 Smith Hacrpr*;tnwn Sr 


754 


742 


.. . 




754 


742 


754 


742 


558 


441 


584 


483 


66 


112 


22'^ Rnntwhnrn Sr 


349 


303 






349 


303 


349 


298 


310 


252 


219 


195 


52 


66 


224 ^nrtli Mcicrprtitnwri Sr 


821 


7K0 






821 


752 


657 


640 


542 


431 


618 


497 


83 


161 


225 Willianisport Sr.-Jr.... 


6o6 


9!;n 
Loyi 


127 


92 


206 


158 


195 


146 


290 


] 99 


233 


173 


19 


O'J 
Z.l 


226 Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 


270 


254 


127 


1 10 


143 


144 


143 


132 


168 


169 


205 


1 OA 


1 / 


9^ 


Uniicnck Sr - Ir 


1 70 
1 <U 


1 7R 
WO 


44 


49 


126 


127 


146 


138 


140 


148 


142 


160 






998 .Sniif VivrKllrrr .Sr . Tr 


242 


234 


135 


100 


107 


131 


115 


131 


217 


1 CO 

1 


01 K 


1 OK 




y 


1 3 


22Q Rnnnshnrn Tr 


256 


216 


256 


216 










256 


216 


256 


216 






230 South Potomac Jr 


387 


395 


387 


395 










387 


395 


387 


395 






231 North Potomac Jr 


457 


421 


457 


421 










457 


421 


457 


421 






2.32 Washington Jr 


274 


272 


274 


272 










274 


272 


274 


272 






233 Hancock Elem.-Jr 


57 


44 


57 


44 










57 


44 


57 


44 






234 Wicomico 


2,070 


2,110 






2,070 


2,110 


1,951 


2,012 


1,793 


1,761 


1,714 


1,704 


185 


300 




530 


551 






530 


551 


490 


506 


377 


352 


306 


297 


29 


62 


236 Mardela Sr.-Jr 


135 


147 






135 


147 


131 


145 


113 


118 


133 


105 






237 Pittsville Sr.-Jr 


112 


122 






112 


122 


110 


120 


103 


94 


102 


105 






238 Salisbury Sr.-Jr 


520 


523 






520 


523 


501 


503 


453 


455 


414 


433 


69 


99 


239 Wicomico Jr 


773 


767 






773 


767 


719 


738 


747 


742 


759 


764 


87 


139 


240 Worcester 


1,099 


1,103 


406 


357 


693 


745 


665 


737 


897 


848 


960 


866 






241 Pocomoke Sr.-Jr 


178 


183 






178 


182 


177 


181 


176 


165 


166 


145 






242 Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 


205 


198 


139 


iio 


66 


88 


66 


88 


182 


159 


190 


148 






243 Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr. 


326 


353 






326 


353 


299 


346 


294 


297 


285 


266 






244 Worcester Sr.-Jr 


390 


369 


267 


247 


123 


122 


123 


122 


245 


227 


319 


307 







* Includes the following number of girls taking General Agriculture: Howard: Glenelg Sr.-Jr.— 4; Montgomery: Damascus Sr.-Jr.— 29; 
Total— 33. 

t Includes the following number of girls taking Vocational Agriculture: Cecil: Rising Sun Sr.-Jr.— 3; Frederick: Thurmont Sr.-Jr.— 1; 
Howard: Glenelg Sr.-Jr.— 1; Total— 5. 

t Includes the following number of girls taking Industrial Education: Baltimore: Dundalk Sr.— 7; Kenwood Sr. — 15; Sparrows Pomt 
Sr.-Jr.— 10; Cecil: Elkton Sr.— 8; Montgomery: Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr.— 13; Gaithersburg Sr.— 63; Montgomery Blair Sr.— 29: 
Richard Montgomery Sr.— 3; Wheaton Sr.— 75; Prince George's: Bladensburg Sr.— 15; Fairmont Heights Sr.-Jr.— 40; Total— 278. 



Maryland State Department of Education 241 



Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1960 



French 


Spanish 


Agriculture 


Industrial 


Home Economics 


Business 
Subjects 


Phyj 
Educ 


rical 


Music 


Art- 


Arts 
'rafts 


• 

Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


Edu. 


General 


Voc. 


ition 






and C 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


198 


105 


132 


4 


11 


42 


96 


389 








324 


143 


163 


239 


679 


670 


440 


469 


141 


126 


199 


18 


13 








45 










54 




31 


80 


166 


137 


75 


107 


36 


30 


/UU 


09 


36 


4 


ii 




51 


156 








96 


82 


74 


81 


203 


211 


165 


159 


105 


96 


201 


41 


55 






42 




135 








82 


61 


40 


29 


198 


182 


145 


123 










28 










98 








92 




18 


49 


112 


140 


55 


80 








171; 


205 


47 


45 




129 


573 








758 


59 


165 


375 


1,106 


1,050 


614 


723 


567 


603 




OO 


42 


















134 




35 


26 


170 


151 


89 


110 


93 


98 


OAR 


90 

/y 


8 








86 


122 








79 


42 


14 


77 


174 


111 


106 


125 


86 


71 


one 






27 


32 




43 


134 








164 




48 


122 


210 


202 


99 


119 


80 


89 




OQ 


124 


20 


13 






203 








292 




46 


117 


420 


486 


203 


252 


212 


265 


208 


1 O 


31 










114 








89 


xi 


22 


33 


132 


100 


117 


117 


96 


80 




lOU 


166 






25 


88 


396 








564 




177 


241 


899 


884 


575 


595 


46 


37 


210 


19 


37 






25 


27 










89 




23 


52 


188 


207 


133 


129 






211 


6 


7 






















30 


18 


60 


47 


14 


13 


"i3 


"\2 


01 


1 Q 


7 










99 








ioo 




16 


33 


99 


99 


61 


62 






010 




35 










168 








224 




77 


97 


217 


219 


207 


223 






01 /4 


























31 


41 


57 


54 






'33 


'25 


91 ^ 
/ID 


72 


80 








'ei 


129 








isi 








257 


238 


ieo 


ies 






01 R 






























21 


20 










217 


171 


194 






18 


112 


297 








260 


82 


145 


231 


713 


690 


344 


267 






01 c 


R9 
DZ 


93 








66 


146 








138 




97 


147 


321 


316 


115 


94 






01 


10 
Oil 


34 






i8 


46 


66 








57 


82 




13 


221 


233 


156 


118 






oon 




67 










85 








65 




48 


71 


171 


141 


73 


55 






221 


350 


424 


146 


116 


20 


245 


2,866 


53 


259 


20 


2,517 


25 


372 


962 


3,554 
469 


3,042 


2,560 


2,607 


1,771 


1.654 


000 


CO 


128 


38 


32 




67 


337 


5 


60 


2 


278 




85 


266 


402 


178 


237 


111 


91 


223 


22 


28 








75 


162 








114 


i4 


73 


89 


177 


193 


97 


113 


22 


19 


224 


76 


106 


108 


'84 






452 




i99 




366 




55 


322 


660 


525 


172 


192 


54 


61 


225 


9 


g 








65 


123 






is 


119 




73 


85 


251 


181 


185 


161 


132 


92 


226 


14 


21 










82 








97 




33 


78 


234 


151 


270 


254 


78 


87 


227 


12 


23 










110 








123 




45 


81 


161 


124 


60 


148 






228 


16 


8 






20 


38 


169 


'48 






72 




8 


41 


171 


118 


167 


154 






229 


119 


102 










256 








216 








256 


216 


256 


216 


256 


2i6 


230 














387 








395 








387 


395 


387 


395 


387 


395 


231 














457 








421 








457 


421 


457 


421 


457 


421 


232 














274 








272 








274 


272 


274 


272 


274 


272 


233 














57 








44 








57 


44 


57 


44 






234 


119 


140 


87 


89 




113 


1,389 


1 


28 




1.300 




346 


592 


1,579 


1.350 
80 


934 


1,073 


987 


1.055 


235 


39 


46 


87 


89 




31 


183 


1 


28 




72 




196 


330 


202 


81 


144 


71 


89 


236 


27 


24 








25 


82 








97 




24 


50 


111 


110 


87 


117 


100 


76 


237 


12 


27 










90 








87 




21 


49 


100 


95 


59 


87 


94 


86 


238 


41 


43 








'46 


318 








382 




105 


163 


459 


401 


313 


350 


314 


311 


239 












11 


716 








662 








707 


664 


394 


375 


408 


493 


240 


120 


198 






43 


51 


583 








499 


40 


176 


333 


794 


717 


458 


477 


184 


191 


241 


41 


57 










100 








93 




20 


63 


151 


121 


76 


59 


72 


70 


242 


22 


27 










95 








89 




36 


58 


176 


142 


74 


53 


27 


41 


243 


30 


69 






43 




247 








192 




73 


99 


251 


264 


135 


173 


48 


52 


244 


27 


45 








"si 


141 








125 


'46 


47 


113 


216 


190 


173 


192 


37 


28 



* Includes the following number taking German: Anne Arundel: Brooklyn Sr.-Jr. — 60 boys— 10 girls; Montgomery: Bethesda-Chevy Chase 
Sr. — 43 boys— 27 girls; Montgomery Blair Sr.— 41 bovs— 27 girls; Northwood Sr. — 41 bovs — 16 girls; Walter Johnson Sr. — 47 boys — 33 girls; 
Prince George's: Bladensburg Sr.— 35 boys— 14 girls; High Point— 54 boys— 15 girls; Total— 321 boys— 142 girls. 

» Includes the following number taking Russian: Baltimore: Towson Sr. — 6 boys— 16 girb. 



INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 226-233 
Accreditation and certification, 39-45 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 148-149 

Expenditures, 216 

Per cent for, 147 

Superintendents, 2, 6-19, 211, 216 
Adult education, 161, 163-165, 219 
Agriculture 

Adult education. 160-161, 163-165 

Enrollment, 105, 111 

Each high school, 234-241 

Federal aid, 160-163 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 116 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution 
by type of fund, 143-146, 194, 212-213 

State teachers colleges, 186-187, 194-195 

Vocational education, 159-168, 194, 213 

Vocational rehabilitation, 192-193, 196-197 
Appropriations 

County, 143-145, 175, 194, 214 

State, 143-145, 194, 212 
Art, high school 

Enrollment, 102, 112 

Each high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Assessable basis, 176-178 
Attendance 

Average daily, 209 

Each high school, 226-233 

Per cent of, 209 

Teachers at summer school, 122 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 81-88 

Auxiliary agencies (see Other school services) 



B 

Jiands, orchestras, glee clubs, 115 
Basic aid per classroom imit, 194, 212 
Belonging, average number, 209 

Each high school, 226-233 

Per teacher, 93 
Birth rates, 89-91 

Board of Education, State, 2, 194, 196 
Boards of Education, counties, 6-19 
Bonds outstanding, school, 172 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementarv. 152 

High, 153 
Expenditures 

All schools, 217, 223 

Elementary, 224 

High, 225 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

Nonpublic, 202-208 
Public, 201 
Graduates, high school, 97-104 
Budget 

Baltimore City, county, local, 143-145, 175 

State public school, 194 

State teachers colleges, 194-195 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capit-al outlay) 

Number of, 119-120, 200 

Value of school, per pupil, 171 
Business education 

Adult, 164-165 

Enrollment, 105, 113, 162, 164-165 
Each high school, 234-241 
Schools offering, 116, 234-241 
Teachers, 116 



c 

Capital outlay, school, 143, 147, 170 
By site, building, equipment, 222 
Certificate status, teachers 126-129 
Certificates held bv county teachers, 121, 123, 126- 
129 

Certification and accreditation, division of, 39-45 
Classes 

Evening schools, 164-165 

Size of, 93 

Special for handicapped, 81-88 
Clerks, county schools, 210 
Collies 

High school graduates 

of 1960 entering, 99-104 
of 1961 entering State teachers colleges, 
98 

Junior, 182, 184-185 

State teachers, 179-184, 186-187, 194-195, 
198-199 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland, 121 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 118 

Transportation of pupils, 156-158 
Construction accounts. State teachers colleges, 

198-199 
Contents, table of, 21 
Core program, high school 

Enrollment, 105 

Each high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Cost per pupil 

Administration, 148-149 

Elementary and high, 151-153 

By type of school, 148-149 

Transported, 156-157 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 
6-19 

Courses in individual high schools, 226-233 
Ctippled children, services for, 81-85, 87-88 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 148-153 
Expenditures 

All schools, 215 

By source of funds, 143-145 
By type of school, 223-225 



D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 72 

Days in session, 72 

Debt service, 172-173, 175, 221 

Tax rate for, 174 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 160-162, 164-165 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 114 

Schools offering, 116 

Teachers, 116 



E 

Elementarv scliools, supervision, 211 
Emergency certificates, 123,126-129 
Employment of high school graduates, 99-101 
English, high school 

Enrollment, 105 

E;ich high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Enrollment 

Adult, 164 

Atvpical children, 81-88 
Elementarv, 72-80, 201-208 



242 



Index 



243 



E — ( Continued ) 

Grade or year, 74, 76-80 
High school 

Course, each school, 226-233 
Subjects, 105-116 

Each school, 234-241 
Year, 74, 76-80 

Each school, 226-233 
Increase in, 73 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 72-73, 7S- 
80, 202-208 

Number of different pupils, 73, 201 

Public, 72-75, 77 

State teaclu rs college, 181-184 

Subject, 105-115 

Each school, 234-241 

Suiiuuary, 72-73 
Equalization fund, 144-145, 212 
Equivalence examinations, 190 
Evening schools and courses 

Enrollment, 164 

Expenditures, 160-161, 163, 219 
Expenditures, 215-225 

(see also Administration, Instruction, Operation, 
Maintenance, Fixed charges. Other school serv- 
ices. Payments to adjoining units. Current ex- 
penses, Debt service, Capital outlay) 

Elementarv schools, 224 

Evening schools, 160-161, 163, 219 

Health, 219 

High schools, 225 

Libraries, 217 

Rehabilitation, 193, 196-197 
Salaries 

All schools, 217, 223 

Elementary, 224 

High, 225 

Vocational, 160-163 
State teachers colleges, 186-187, 194-195, 197, 
198-199 

Total, by major classifications, 194, 215 
Transportation, 156-157, 219 
Vocational, Federal, 160-168 
Experience of teachors, 130-135 



F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Fall enrollment, 72, 74-80 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 159-163 

Administration and supervision, 160-161 
Salaries of teachers, 160-162 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 186-187, 194-195 
Financial statements 

State public schools, 194, 212-225 

State teachers colleges, 194-195, 198-199 
First grade nonpromotions, 96 
Fixed charges, 147-149, 220 
Kreiifli, high school 

Enrollment. 105, 110 

Each higli scliool, 234-241 

Schools offering. 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 



G 

Herman (see French) 

Olee clubs, bands, orchestras, 115 

Grade enrollment, 74, 76-80 

Graduates 

High school, 97-104 

Entering State teachers colleges, 98-101, 
103 

From each school, 226-233 
Occupations of, 99-101 
State teachers college, 179-180 
Guidance, teachers of, 116 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 82, 87, 194 
Home instruction, 81-82, 84 
Hospital schools, 81-82 84 
Institutions for, 82, 88 
Opportunities for education of, 81-88 
Preschool, 87 

Receipts from State for, 82, 87, 194, 212 
Health expenditures, all schools, 219 
Hearing, conservation of, 81, 83, 85-86 
High school equivalence examinations, 190 
High schools 

Disbursemenls, 225 

Individual, 29J)-2S3, 234-241 

Supervision, 211 
FlDiue economics 

Adult, 160-161, 164-165 

Enrollment, 105, 111 

Each high school, 234-241 

Federal aid, 160-163 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Home instruction of pupils, 81-82. 84 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 81-82, 84 



I 

Incorporated towns, levy for, 174 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 46-58 
Cost per pupil, 151-153 
Expenditures, 223-225 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 217 
State teachers colleges. 186-187 
Per cent of current expense budget, 147 
Inventories, State teachers colleges, 187 



J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, 211 
Junior colleges, 182, 184-185, 212 



K 

Kindergartens, 74, 76-80 
Nonpublic, 202-208 



L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 23-27 

Length of school session. 72 

Letter of transmittal, 22 

Levies, county, 175 

Librarians, coiuity, 5-6 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 191. 194 

Public, 5-6, 191, 194 

School, 217 
Library extension, division of, 62-66 
Lip reading classes, 86 
Loans to students, college, 197 
Lunch program, school, 166-169, 213, 219 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 

Expenditures, 218, 223-225 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 

Materials of instruction (see Books and instruc- 
tional materials) 



244 



Index 



M — (Continued) 

Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 105, 109 

Each high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Medical examinations, bus drivers, 212 
Men teachers, 117, 210 

Mentally handicapped children, 81-85, 87, 88 
Milk program, special, 167, 213, 219 
Minimum program, State, 146 
Minutes, State Board, 28-38 
Music high school 

Enrollment, 105, 112 

Each high school, 234-241 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 115 

Schools offering, 1 16, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 



N 

National Defense Education Act, 159, 213 
Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult educa- 
tion) 
Nonpromotions, 

Elementary, 95-96 

First grade, 96 

High school, 94 
Number belonging, 209 

Each high school, 226-233 

Per teacher, 93 
Number of different pupils, 73, 201 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 88 

Having one teacher, 118, 200 

Nonpublic, 72, 202-208 

Public. 72, 200 

Elementary, 118, 119-120, 200 
High, 119-120, 200 



o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 99-101 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 118 

Number belonging in, 118 

Number of, 118, 200 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 

Expenditures, 218, 223-225 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 
Orchestras, bands, ulee clubs, 115 
Other school services 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 

Expenditures, 219, 223-225 

Per cent of current expense budget, 147 



P 

I'aroni -foachtT associations, 189 
Parochial and private schools, 72-73, 78-80, 202- 
208 

Part-payment of salaries, 212 

Payments to adjoining units, 220 

Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 

Physical education and health, 219 

Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 194 

Enrollment, 105, 112 

Each high school, 234-241 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Physical examinations (see Medical examinations) 
Physically handicapped children, 81-88 
Preparation, teachers, 124-125 
Preschool handicapped, 87 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 6 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 211 



P — ( Continued ) 

Private and parochial schools, 72-73, 78-80, 202- 

208 

Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore City, 176-177 

School, 171 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 6-19 

Supervisoi-8 of, 211 
Salaries, 219 

Pupils, 

Atypical, 81-88 

Nonpublic, 72-73, 78-80, 202-208 
One-teacher schools, 118 
Per teacher, 93 
Public school 

Enrollment, 72-75, 77, 201 

Number attending, 209 

Number belonging, 209 

Per cent of attendance, 209 
Transported, 156-157 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 214 
Federal government, 213 
Evening schools, 163 
Teachers' salaries, 159-162 
Vocational education, 159-162 
State, 212 

Distributed by tvpe of fund, 143-145, 

194-212 
Evening schools, 163 
Total and per cent, 143-145 
Teachers colleges, 186-187, 194-195 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 3-5, 67-71, 192-193, 

194, 196-197 
Repair, utility men, janitors, 211 
Resignations, teachers, 136-137 
Retarded children, programs for, 81-88 
Retirement system for teachers, 5, 188, 194 
Russian (see French) 



s 

Salaries 

Per cent of school budget. 147 
Superintendents', 216 
Supervisors', 217 

Pupil personnel, 219 
Teachers' 

Average per teacher, 154-155 

Cost per pupil for, 151-153 
Total 

Elementary, 224 

High, 225 
Vocational, 160-163 
School lunch program, 166-169, 213, 219 
Schools 

For atvpical children, 88 

Number of, 72-73, 118, 119-120, 200, 202-208 
Science, high school 

Enrollment, 105, 108 

Each liiffh school, 234-241 
Schools offering, 116, 234-241 
Teachers, 116 
Session, length of, 72 
Sex of teachers, 117, 210 
Size of 

Classes, 93 
Schools 

Each high school, 226-233 
Elementary, 118, 119-120 
High, 119-120 
Teaching staff, 72-73, 118, 210 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 105-107 

Each high school, 234-241 
Schools offering, 116, 234-241 
Teachers, 116 



Index 



245 



S — (Continued) 

Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 81-88 

Special high school teachers, 116 

Special milk program, 167, 213, 219 

State 

Aid to schools, 143-145 

Minimum program, 146 
Showing various funds, 194, 212 
Board of Education, 2 

Excerpts from minutes of, 28-38 
Department of Education, 2-5, 194, 196-197 
Public school budget, 194-197 
Teachers colleges, 6, 98, 101, 103, 179-184, 

186-187, 194-195, 197, 198-199 
Teachers' retirement system, 188, 194 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Business 
education) 

Subjects studied in high schools, 105-115 

Each high school, 234-241 
Summer school attendance 

County teachers, 122 
Superintendents, 2, 6-19, 211 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 151-153 

Cost, salaries, expenses, 217 

By type of school, 223-225 

Names of, 2-5, 6-19 

Number of, 211 

Per cent of current ex-pense budget, 147 
Salaries of, 217, 223-225 
State, 2-5 



T 

Table of contents, 21 

Taxable basis, 170-178 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 147 

Tax rates, coimty, 174 

Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 116 
Average salary, 154-155 
Certificate status, 126-129 
Certification, 39-45. 121, 123, 126-129 
Colleges, 6, 98, 101, 103, 179-184, 186-187, 

194-195, 197, 198-199, 226-233 
Experience, 130-135 
Number of, 210 

For each high school subject, 116 
In each high school, 226-233 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 88 

Nonpublic, 72-73, 202-208 

Public, 72-73, 210 
Of atypical children, 83, 86, 88 
Preparation, 124-125 



T — (Continued) 

Pupils per, 93 
Resignations, 136-137 
Salaries, average, 154-155 
Sex of, 117, 210 

Special subjects, high school, 116 

Summary, elementary and high, public ajid 

nonpublic, 72-73 
Summer school attendance, 122 
Training institutions, 179-184, 186-187, 194- 

195, 197, 198-199 
Turnover of, 136-142 
Teachers* retirement system 

Financial statements, 188, 194 
Staff, 5 

Teachers' contriltutions to, 188 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult, 160-161, 163-105 

Enrollment, 105, 111, 102 

Each high school, 234-241 

Federal aid, 159-163 

Schools offering, 116, 234-241 

Teachers, 116 
Training centers. State teachers colleges, 181-183 
Transmittal, letter of, 22 
Transportation of pupils 

Cost, total and per pupil, 156-157, 219 

Per cent transported, 156-157 
Turnover in teaching staff, 136-142 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 176-178 
School property, i 7 1 
Vocational education 
Division of, 59-61 
Enrollment 

Day schools, 105, 111, 162, 234-241 
Evening schools, 164-165 
Federal aid, 159-163, 194, 213 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-5, 67-71, 192-193, 194, 
196 



w 

Wealth back of each pupil belonging, 178 
Withdrawals 

Pupils, 92 

Teachers. 136-137 



Y 

Year, length of school, 72 



/ 



I 3 m3D OEbtlS^fl 




UWIV. Of MO. COLLEGE PABK